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Date: 26 Dec 2004 00:14:14
From: 1966olds
Subject: temperature risk to bowling ball?
Am interested in assessing the level of risk from temperature extremes
on mainstream or recent model bowling balls (I have some very old
relics (LT48 and a Black Diamond for instance) that I don't worry much
about, but also several ranging in age from 2 weeks old to just a few
years.

Have heard and read stories of bowling balls cracking or being
otherwise damaged by extreme heat and cold, and been cautioned by
pro-shop owners too. Living on a 3rd floor condo and not wanting to lug
my two ball bag up and down the stairs every day, nor wanting to risk
damage to my equipment poses a dilemma.

I usually bring the bag inside if the temperature is expected to be
below 20 degrees or above 90 degrees for a considerable length of time,
and also try to wait at least 20-30 minutes after entering the bowling
center before using my best equipment if that particular ball has been
in the car and exposed to extreme temperatures for some time. Have
never had any mishaps or cracks, but still worry, cause most of the
time 2 of my bowling balls ARE left in the trunk of the car.

My question is.... is there a substantial danger to the balls in just
BEING in a hot or cold car for a lengthy period of time, or is it only
if they are actually put into use and hurled down the lanes within a
very short time of having been brought in from the cold or hot climate
outdoors? In other words, is the risk mainly from rapid temperature
fluctuations, or can sitting in a cold or hot car cause problems even
if the bowling balls are treated "gently" in the transition from hot to
cold and otherwise?

Don't know that there would be one right answer or an absolute one. No
one is going to say there is no risk at all in leaving the balls
exposed to the temperature extremes. But am interested in a general
consensus of responses as to what most of you in the group know or
believe as to the LEVEL of risk so long as the balls are given time to
heat up or cool off gradually.

Thanks,
Larry





 
Date: 04 Jan 2005 23:06:30
From: 1966olds
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
Yep... Same forecast. And at about 1:00am CDT, looks like about 2-3
inches so far.

I've driven through worse to bowl, but am admittedly a fanatic. Once,
about 15 years ago, with about 18 inches of snow on the ground, only
half the league showed up, and it was decided we could bowl, but that
the games would not count toward team standings.

Being a diehard bowler and haven successfully arrived [finally] at what
I considered my ultimate destination, I would have been tougher on the
no shows. But several years later I'm a little more understanding of
the fact that not everyone is as insane as I am about bowling no matter
what.

Anyway, I hope you still get to bowl, if you can get to the lanes.
Larry



 
Date: 04 Jan 2005 19:05:34
From: 1966olds
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
Hi Dar,

Only two in the trunk at a time, and my car is front-wheel drive, so
probably no traction benefits.

:-)

As for that lovely weather, what was yours this morning has made its
way here tonight. Its sleeting now and we're supposed to get 8-12
inches of snow by tomorrow night. I think the weather people are all
wet (pun not intended), but every once in awhile they get it right.

Personally, I like snow but if they're right, San Diego, Magnetic
Island, and Hawaii will probably be looking pretty good after
navigating through the slop the next several days.
It IS good bowling weather though!

Larry



  
Date: 05 Jan 2005 00:52:56
From: Darby
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
Your forecast is the same as ours. By this time tomorrow night we'll have a
foot or more of snow. It started around 10:00 PM and we only have a couple
inches so far. I doubt if we'll bowl tomorrow night.
Dar

"1966olds" <news.20.1988@spamgourmet.com > wrote
>
> Only two in the trunk at a time, and my car is front-wheel drive, so
> probably no traction benefits.
>
> :-)
>
> As for that lovely weather, what was yours this morning has made its
> way here tonight. Its sleeting now and we're supposed to get 8-12
> inches of snow by tomorrow night. I think the weather people are all
> wet (pun not intended), but every once in awhile they get it right.
>
> Personally, I like snow but if they're right, San Diego, Magnetic
> Island, and Hawaii will probably be looking pretty good after
> navigating through the slop the next several days.
> It IS good bowling weather though!
>
> Larry
>




   
Date: 19 Jan 2005 03:17:51
From: NimBill
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
>From: "Darby" darlene@caves.net

>Your forecast is the same as ours. By this time tomorrow night we'll have a
>foot or more of snow. It started around 10:00 PM and we only have a couple
>inches so far. I doubt if we'll bowl tomorrow night.
>Dar

I saw a picture of snow once in a school book. We just don't get it here. I'm
loving it!










    
Date: 18 Jan 2005 22:54:00
From: Darby
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
You mean that in all of your travels for the Armed Services you never were
stationed where it snowed?
Dar

"NimBill" <nimbill@aol.comtisme > wrote
> >From: "Darby" darlene@caves.net
>
>>Your forecast is the same as ours. By this time tomorrow night we'll have
>>a
>>foot or more of snow. It started around 10:00 PM and we only have a couple
>>inches so far. I doubt if we'll bowl tomorrow night.
>>Dar
>
> I saw a picture of snow once in a school book. We just don't get it here.
> I'm
> loving it!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>




    
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Date: 04 Jan 2005 04:36:33
From: 1966olds
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
Rob,

That makes sense. In fact.. although I couldn't quite put into words,
I'm not just worried about the newer balls because they're recent
investments, but because being more recent, I don't know if they might
be more (or less) susceptible to weather changes.

Althought they're different from the other balls in my arsenal as far
as the way they react on the lanes ---and of course there's the
advertising of their different coverstocks---am wondering how different
they are from the 2 or 3 year old balls I have.

Not expecting that you or anyone can defnitively say that this or that
ball would freeze at such and such a temperature and another would not,
but just for the heck of it, listed below are the ones I have with
approximate age ranges. Some I know would either be unaffected at most
temps (or they're so old I wouldn;t care). But interested in whether
the newest balls differ that much in composition from say one I bought
a couple years ago.

Listing (ages only guestimates:

Brunswick Black Diamond, 25-30 years
LT-48, 15-20 years
Champions Ultimate Weapon, 7-8 years
Columbia Complete Chaos, 6-7 years
Storm Trauma Recovery, 2-4 years
Storm El-Nino X-it, 2-4 years
Brunswick Danger HPC, 2-4 years
Storm Triple X-Factor, 6 months
Storm Triple Xtreme, 5 months

(The triple-x's are my "babies" and I hate having to be so careful with
them, but am so happy with them, that am more paranoid---or
sensible---about caring for them.)

Thank you, regardless,
Larry



  
Date: 04 Jan 2005 11:21:36
From: Darby
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
Larry, do you carry all of these bowling balls around in your trunk? I live
in Iowa and can't help but think of the "traction" they'd give you on icy
roads. We're experiencing that weather right now. :(
Dar

"1966olds" <news.20.1988@spamgourmet.com > wrote in message
news:1104842193.039993.251830@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Rob,
>
> That makes sense. In fact.. although I couldn't quite put into words,
> I'm not just worried about the newer balls because they're recent
> investments, but because being more recent, I don't know if they might
> be more (or less) susceptible to weather changes.
>
> Althought they're different from the other balls in my arsenal as far
> as the way they react on the lanes ---and of course there's the
> advertising of their different coverstocks---am wondering how different
> they are from the 2 or 3 year old balls I have.
>
> Not expecting that you or anyone can defnitively say that this or that
> ball would freeze at such and such a temperature and another would not,
> but just for the heck of it, listed below are the ones I have with
> approximate age ranges. Some I know would either be unaffected at most
> temps (or they're so old I wouldn;t care). But interested in whether
> the newest balls differ that much in composition from say one I bought
> a couple years ago.
>
> Listing (ages only guestimates:
>
> Brunswick Black Diamond, 25-30 years
> LT-48, 15-20 years
> Champions Ultimate Weapon, 7-8 years
> Columbia Complete Chaos, 6-7 years
> Storm Trauma Recovery, 2-4 years
> Storm El-Nino X-it, 2-4 years
> Brunswick Danger HPC, 2-4 years
> Storm Triple X-Factor, 6 months
> Storm Triple Xtreme, 5 months
>
> (The triple-x's are my "babies" and I hate having to be so careful with
> them, but am so happy with them, that am more paranoid---or
> sensible---about caring for them.)
>
> Thank you, regardless,
> Larry
>




 
Date: 04 Jan 2005 18:30:19
From: Rob & Kirsty Buckley
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
1966olds wrote:
>
> Tony,
>
> Thank you. The humor IS appreciated.
>
> And thanks for not giving me a lecture like the others, no matter how
> good their intentions. Its a lot more helpful to hear from someone who
> acknowledges they don't have the answer (WHAT temperature extremes
> bowling balls can tolerate-or under WHICH conditions), versus those who
> change the subject (to IF they can handle extremes) and then respond as
> if I had no idea there was a risk at all. Was looking for some
> clarification of temperature extremes and their KNOWN effects on
> bowling balls. Not a simple yes or no answer----or the lectures to
> boot.
>
> And my apologies to the City of San Diego too for not including it as
> an example of a place with a moderate climate.
>
> :-)
>
> Larry

One problem with getting a definite answer to this sort of question is
that it will vary from ball to ball, depending on the type and
percentage of resin, and general composition of the ball. Polymers
suchas the urethanes used in modern balls are used in a plastic state,
where the molecules are free to move a little in the solid. Cool them
enough, and the plastic can 'crystallise' into a true solid, which is
much more brittle and is usually accompanied by a density/volume change.
It is actually a phase change, similar to ice- >water but less physically
obvious, and the temperature at which it occurs is called the glass
transition temperature, or Tg.
Cooling a ball below Tg would be bad, but since each model will be
different, there is no real way of knowing exactly what the Tg is for
any particular ball. If I get time, I might have a look at the patent
literature for urethanes, and see if I can get some idea of the range,
but offhand I have no idea what the 'danger zone' might be.

Cheers, Rob.
PS - Like San Diego, Magnetic Island is probably not the type of place
where I need to be too worried about the cold!


  
Date: 04 Jan 2005 12:37:50
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
WOW! That sounds like on beautiful place to be! I actually envy you!

http://www.magnetic-island.com.au/

Rob & Kirsty Buckley wrote:
> 1966olds wrote:
>
>>Tony,
>>
>>Thank you. The humor IS appreciated.
>>
>>And thanks for not giving me a lecture like the others, no matter how
>>good their intentions. Its a lot more helpful to hear from someone who
>>acknowledges they don't have the answer (WHAT temperature extremes
>>bowling balls can tolerate-or under WHICH conditions), versus those who
>>change the subject (to IF they can handle extremes) and then respond as
>>if I had no idea there was a risk at all. Was looking for some
>>clarification of temperature extremes and their KNOWN effects on
>>bowling balls. Not a simple yes or no answer----or the lectures to
>>boot.
>>
>>And my apologies to the City of San Diego too for not including it as
>>an example of a place with a moderate climate.
>>
>>:-)
>>
>>Larry
>
>
> One problem with getting a definite answer to this sort of question is
> that it will vary from ball to ball, depending on the type and
> percentage of resin, and general composition of the ball. Polymers
> suchas the urethanes used in modern balls are used in a plastic state,
> where the molecules are free to move a little in the solid. Cool them
> enough, and the plastic can 'crystallise' into a true solid, which is
> much more brittle and is usually accompanied by a density/volume change.
> It is actually a phase change, similar to ice->water but less physically
> obvious, and the temperature at which it occurs is called the glass
> transition temperature, or Tg.
> Cooling a ball below Tg would be bad, but since each model will be
> different, there is no real way of knowing exactly what the Tg is for
> any particular ball. If I get time, I might have a look at the patent
> literature for urethanes, and see if I can get some idea of the range,
> but offhand I have no idea what the 'danger zone' might be.
>
> Cheers, Rob.
> PS - Like San Diego, Magnetic Island is probably not the type of place
> where I need to be too worried about the cold!


 
Date: 03 Jan 2005 04:37:00
From: 1966olds
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
Tony,

Thank you. The humor IS appreciated.

And thanks for not giving me a lecture like the others, no matter how
good their intentions. Its a lot more helpful to hear from someone who
acknowledges they don't have the answer (WHAT temperature extremes
bowling balls can tolerate-or under WHICH conditions), versus those who
change the subject (to IF they can handle extremes) and then respond as
if I had no idea there was a risk at all. Was looking for some
clarification of temperature extremes and their KNOWN effects on
bowling balls. Not a simple yes or no answer----or the lectures to
boot.

And my apologies to the City of San Diego too for not including it as
an example of a place with a moderate climate.

:-)

Larry



  
Date: 03 Jan 2005 17:56:56
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
You are very welcome! :-P

All humor aside... Even when I used to live in the Puget Sound area of
Washington State, I always left my equipment in my car. Granted, Western
Washington doesn't get all that cold so it still isn't all that great of
an example. I don't believe heat is that big of a concern... after all,
many of us here have used the oven method (which we have come to find
out doesn't work the way we thought it did) to remove oil from bowling
balls by baking them at 150F... never harmed any of my equipment...
but, if you were to cook a ball at say 200F, I think the results might
be a bit different (I'm melting, I melting... aaaaahhhhhh!). Extreme
cold, on the other hand, I do believe to be much more dangerous to a
bowling ball. Many different materials make up a bowling ball
(coverstock, inner core, and usually several different materials in the
weight block construction). All materials expand and contract
differently with changes in temperature... that, combined with materials
becoming molecularly brittle as they become colder (i.e. a rose or a
banana shattering after being dipped in liquid nitrogen and struck on a
hard surface) does make it a genuine hazard. How cold does it have to
be? I don't know. If I lived in the Great Lakes area would I bring my
equipment into the house in the winter? You bet... if I didn't shoot
myself first for picking such a climatically nasty place to live! ;-)

1966olds wrote:
> Tony,
>
> Thank you. The humor IS appreciated.
>
> And thanks for not giving me a lecture like the others, no matter how
> good their intentions. Its a lot more helpful to hear from someone who
> acknowledges they don't have the answer (WHAT temperature extremes
> bowling balls can tolerate-or under WHICH conditions), versus those who
> change the subject (to IF they can handle extremes) and then respond as
> if I had no idea there was a risk at all. Was looking for some
> clarification of temperature extremes and their KNOWN effects on
> bowling balls. Not a simple yes or no answer----or the lectures to
> boot.
>
> And my apologies to the City of San Diego too for not including it as
> an example of a place with a moderate climate.
>
> :-)
>
> Larry
>


   
Date: 03 Jan 2005 21:02:52
From: John O
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
>If I lived in the Great Lakes area would I bring my equipment into the
>house in the winter? You bet... if I didn't shoot myself first for picking
>such a climatically nasty place to live! ;-)

Chicken.... :-)

I did bring the bag in the house when the forecast called for -10 F, but a
couple of my balls are stored in the garage. They didn't explode or
anything, yet. I bet that rapid heating/cooling has the most effect, and a
slow cold won't do much.

-John O




   
Date: 03 Jan 2005 14:51:34
From: Joe Zachar
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
I would just add that the temperature issues come about mostly because
the ball companies have listed it on their warranty information (printed
on the box) that such damage to your ball from extreme temperatures
would void the warranty. I think the extreme temperatures were below
freezing and above 90 degrees.

Maybe they are making balls different but my new Track Slash Warranty
does not list damage by extreme temperature as a way to void the
warranty. But it might be included in the "proper care" or "otherwise
been abused" clause. I will print the warranty (as listed on the bottom
of the Track bowling ball box).

"ONE YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY"

"Manufacturer warrants for one year from the date of purchase against
defective workmanship and/or material when used for the purpose
intended, under normal conditions, and provided they receive proper
care. This "limited warranty" is void if the ball has been plugged, has
grips or thumb slugs inserted, has been used as a "house Ball", or has
otherwise been abused. Damage caused by improperly cared for lanes or
pinsetter damage is not covered. All merchandise covered under this
warranty should be returned to the dealer from whom it was purchased. A
sales slip showing date of purchase must be submitted. This warranty
does not cover incidental costs including, but not limited to freight,
remeasuring or drilling.

The warranty provided herein is in lieu of all other expressed
warranties, including any implied warranties of merchantability or
fitness for particular purpose, are limited in duration to the first
twelve (12) months from the date of purchase. All other obligations or
liabilities, including liability for consequential damages are hereby
excluded.

This warranty give you specific legal rights, and you may also have
other rights which vary from state to state."

Joe Z







Tony R Smith wrote:

> You are very welcome! :-P
>
> All humor aside... Even when I used to live in the Puget Sound area of
> Washington State, I always left my equipment in my car. Granted,
> Western Washington doesn't get all that cold so it still isn't all
> that great of an example. I don't believe heat is that big of a
> concern... after all, many of us here have used the oven method (which
> we have come to find out doesn't work the way we thought it did) to
> remove oil from bowling balls by baking them at 150F... never harmed
> any of my equipment... but, if you were to cook a ball at say 200F, I
> think the results might be a bit different (I'm melting, I melting...
> aaaaahhhhhh!). Extreme cold, on the other hand, I do believe to be
> much more dangerous to a bowling ball. Many different materials make
> up a bowling ball (coverstock, inner core, and usually several
> different materials in the weight block construction). All materials
> expand and contract differently with changes in temperature... that,
> combined with materials becoming molecularly brittle as they become
> colder (i.e. a rose or a banana shattering after being dipped in
> liquid nitrogen and struck on a hard surface) does make it a genuine
> hazard. How cold does it have to be? I don't know. If I lived in the
> Great Lakes area would I bring my equipment into the house in the
> winter? You bet... if I didn't shoot myself first for picking such a
> climatically nasty place to live! ;-)
>
> 1966olds wrote:
>
>> Tony,
>>
>> Thank you. The humor IS appreciated.
>>
>> And thanks for not giving me a lecture like the others, no matter how
>> good their intentions. Its a lot more helpful to hear from someone who
>> acknowledges they don't have the answer (WHAT temperature extremes
>> bowling balls can tolerate-or under WHICH conditions), versus those who
>> change the subject (to IF they can handle extremes) and then respond as
>> if I had no idea there was a risk at all. Was looking for some
>> clarification of temperature extremes and their KNOWN effects on
>> bowling balls. Not a simple yes or no answer----or the lectures to
>> boot.
>>
>> And my apologies to the City of San Diego too for not including it as
>> an example of a place with a moderate climate.
>>
>> :-)
>>
>> Larry
>>



  
Date: 03 Jan 2005 13:42:42
From: netnews.comcast.net
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
The problem is there is no magic number for the temp. If its 80 outside and
raining the trunk won't get as hot, if its 80 and cloudy the trucnk will be
hotter, if its 80 and sunny the trunk can get over 120. if its 80, sunny,
but you are parked in the shade the trunk wont get as bad.
"1966olds" <news.20.1988@spamgourmet.com > wrote in message
news:1104755820.158458.258750@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Tony,
>
> Thank you. The humor IS appreciated.
>
> And thanks for not giving me a lecture like the others, no matter how
> good their intentions. Its a lot more helpful to hear from someone who
> acknowledges they don't have the answer (WHAT temperature extremes
> bowling balls can tolerate-or under WHICH conditions), versus those who
> change the subject (to IF they can handle extremes) and then respond as
> if I had no idea there was a risk at all. Was looking for some
> clarification of temperature extremes and their KNOWN effects on
> bowling balls. Not a simple yes or no answer----or the lectures to
> boot.
>
> And my apologies to the City of San Diego too for not including it as
> an example of a place with a moderate climate.
>
> :-)
>
> Larry
>




   
Date: 04 Jan 2005 01:03:24
From: NimBill
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
>From: "netnews.comcast.net" crapmail12@comcast.net

>The problem is there is no magic number for the temp. If its 80 outside and
>raining the trunk won't get as hot, if its 80 and cloudy the trucnk will be
>hotter, if its 80 and sunny the trunk can get over 120. if its 80, sunny,
>but you are parked in the shade the trunk wont get as bad.
>"1966olds"

The real problem is where you live! Down here in Southern New Mexico we often
see cars catch fire and blow up because of being parked with windows closed.










 
Date: 02 Jan 2005 21:55:01
From: 1966olds
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
I appreciate the cautions, but again... But having acknowledged that
temperature extremes can harm the balls, am still looking for some
objective guidelines on what temperatures are considered extreme by the
maunfacturers for example.

What do YOU think is extreme cold...below 40 degrees? 30? Below zero?

And at the other end of the specturm, unless one lives in Hawaii, its
not likely the outside temps will always stay a perfect 70 degrees. So
where would the [danger] line be drawn? 80 degrees? 90?

Been bowling for decades vs years and have kept balls in the trunk in
real extremes for partial days, though I try to bring them in if its
going to be colder than 20 (Fahreneheit) or higher than 85.
Are those ranges reasonable? Too strict? Or downright reckless?



  
Date: 10 Jan 2005 19:36:06
From: 1966olds
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
1) What part of:

"Not expecting that you or anyone can definitively say that this or
that ball would freeze at such and such a temperature and another would
not, but interested in whether the newest balls differ that much in
composition from say one I bought a couple years ago."

did you not comprehend?

2) Just how hot or cold do you think the houses would let their
facilities get when closed? Lots of stuff more vulnerable than bowling
balls to temperature changes likes plumbing and electronics that they
would want to avoid damaging.

3) As for being slow , it took you a whole week to come up with that
response?


CPOWHR wrote:
> What part of "There are no absolute guidelines are you too slow
witted to
> comprehend?"
>
> Ball manufacturers are not going to post absolute guidelines because
unless
> they equip balls with thermo-humidigraphs the warranty claim is
subject to
> debate between buyer and seller.
>
> Add in the problem of houses with rental lockers that turn off
environmental
> controls when closed.



  
Date: 11 Jan 2005 01:40:24
From: CPOWHR
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
>From: "1966olds" news.20.1988@spamgourmet.com

>I appreciate the cautions, but again... But having acknowledged that
>temperature extremes can harm the balls, am still looking for some
>objective guidelines on what temperatures are considered extreme by the
>maunfacturers for example.
>
>What do YOU think is extreme cold...below 40 degrees? 30? Below zero?
>
>And at the other end of the specturm, unless one lives in Hawaii, its
>not likely the outside temps will always stay a perfect 70 degrees. So
>where would the [danger] line be drawn? 80 degrees? 90?
>
>Been bowling for decades vs years and have kept balls in the trunk in
>real extremes for partial days, though I try to bring them in if its
>going to be colder than 20 (Fahreneheit) or higher than 85.
>Are those ranges reasonable? Too strict? Or downright reckless?
>

What part of "There are no absolute guidelines are you too slow witted to
comprehend?"

Ball manufacturers are not going to post absolute guidelines because unless
they equip balls with thermo-humidigraphs the warranty claim is subject to
debate between buyer and seller.

Add in the problem of houses with rental lockers that turn off environmental
controls when closed.




  
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From:
Subject:


  
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From:
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Date: 03 Jan 2005 22:11:08
From: 1966olds
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
You were all spared a much longer reply. I stupidly hit the "no frame"
link so I could proofread what I had written, and "poof"!!!! No more
reply.

:-(

Here is a shorter one:

I do have a 2-ball locker but only at one of the bowling centers I
frequent. And I usually only buy a new ball once every few years, but
this year bought 3, and am very attached to them, so "freezing" them
...even cryogenically...isn't something I want to do. Yet, to have them
with me at both houses, they would have to be in the car exposed to
rather cold temps at least occasionally.

Already planned to keep the newest equipment in the locker till we're
at the tail end of winter, but decided to post here to see if there was
a relatively objective means of judging when to bring the balls in from
the cold and when the temps were still within a range considered
moderate by the ball manufacturers and/or some knowledgeable bowling
people. That way, I would know when its worth lugging my two ball bag
into work for the day (normally do not stop at home between work and
bowling), and when its not really necessary.

Thank you to everyone who has replied...including two people who
emailed me, though I haven't had time to respond yet.

Larry



  
Date: 04 Jan 2005 00:58:27
From: NimBill
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
>From: "1966olds" news.20.1988@spamgourmet.com

>
>I appreciate the cautions, but again... But having acknowledged that
>temperature extremes can harm the balls, am still looking for some
>objective guidelines on what temperatures are considered extreme by the
>maunfacturers for example.
>
>What do YOU think is extreme cold...below 40 degrees? 30? Below zero?
>
>And at the other end of the specturm, unless one lives in Hawaii, its
>not likely the outside temps will always stay a perfect 70 degrees. So
>where would the [danger] line be drawn? 80 degrees? 90?
>
>Been bowling for decades vs years and have kept balls in the trunk in
>real extremes for partial days, though I try to bring them in if its
>going to be colder than 20 (Fahreneheit) or higher than 85.
>Are those ranges reasonable? Too strict? Or downright reckless?
>

Back in the days when all balls were made of rubber everyone had only one ball
and took really good care of it although it really did not matter.

Then Plastic balls came along and folks noticed cracks if they left the ball in
the car trunk on extremely hot or cold days or nights. Back then locker rental
fees were like $5/year and few used them.

Modern balls like Reactives or Pro-Actives will start to seperate at 32F on the
low side and I'm just guessing 90F+ on the high side.

Bowling alley lockers are a good thing to have if your bowling center can put
down a consistant shot. Mine can't so I turned in my locker key over a year ago
because I need too many choices of bowling balls I own to fit into a locker.










  
Date: 03 Jan 2005 06:33:43
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
I keep my bowling balls in my car year round... but I live in San Diego
so I'm not of much help! ;-)

1966olds wrote:
> I appreciate the cautions, but again... But having acknowledged that
> temperature extremes can harm the balls, am still looking for some
> objective guidelines on what temperatures are considered extreme by the
> maunfacturers for example.
>
> What do YOU think is extreme cold...below 40 degrees? 30? Below zero?
>
> And at the other end of the specturm, unless one lives in Hawaii, its
> not likely the outside temps will always stay a perfect 70 degrees. So
> where would the [danger] line be drawn? 80 degrees? 90?
>
> Been bowling for decades vs years and have kept balls in the trunk in
> real extremes for partial days, though I try to bring them in if its
> going to be colder than 20 (Fahreneheit) or higher than 85.
> Are those ranges reasonable? Too strict? Or downright reckless?
>


 
Date: 26 Dec 2004 13:01:40
From: 1966olds
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
No problems with the thumb sticking...at least not due to stickiness.
In fact...thumbhole is usually to snug at first (all weather
conditions) and adding a piece of tape or some Grip Cream is necessary
to stop the sensation of the ball sliding off my thumb.

I have a locker at one of the two bowling centers I frequent. But even
if I get a locker at the other one, I have 9 balls, so would still end
up with a couple in the car at any given time.

Main concern is with permanent damage. If the thumb sticks or I have
other problems from a cold ball, well.. that's correctable. Just don't
want to permanently ruin a ball while it sits unused in the car.

I suppose I could rent a locker at the second bowling center too ---its
not the money---just prefer having a couple bowling balls with me so
they're "available" whichever center I happen to be going to that day.

Are there specs for what temperatures are dangerous for the balls or
not? Mostly see cautions about hot or cold conditions without specific
mention of temperature thresholds. Are there any publicized specs on
temperature tolerances of different bowling balls?



  
Date: 30 Dec 2004 18:33:39
From: Steve Lawson
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
Do not under any circumstances allow your balls to hit either temperature
extreme (cold in winter, hot in the trunk of your car in the summer). A
ball separating or cracking because of that is likely not to be covered
under warranty. The materials in the balls do not all have the same
coefficient of expansion.....so it is very possible that the variance in
expansionand contraction can cause cracking and/or core separation. I know
this sounds rash and YMMV.....but I've seen the results of both extremes
(and also the result of a ball going from one extreme quickly to another).
It's not pretty.

SL




 
Date: 26 Dec 2004 09:37:25
From: Jimmy DeGazz
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
I, myself, do not leave my equipment in the car. Have read in here many
times about this. Cold temps especially will cause a 'thumb-sticking'
problem. I do leave it in the trunk for an hour or two on a hot day to let
it sweat out some oil. If you only bowl at one center, perhaps you should
consider renting a locker. Most places charge $10.00 a year

"1966olds" <news.20.1988@spamgourmet.com > wrote in message
news:1104048854.058221.19120@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Am interested in assessing the level of risk from temperature extremes
> on mainstream or recent model bowling balls (I have some very old
> relics (LT48 and a Black Diamond for instance) that I don't worry much
> about, but also several ranging in age from 2 weeks old to just a few
> years.
>
> Have heard and read stories of bowling balls cracking or being
> otherwise damaged by extreme heat and cold, and been cautioned by
> pro-shop owners too. Living on a 3rd floor condo and not wanting to lug
> my two ball bag up and down the stairs every day, nor wanting to risk
> damage to my equipment poses a dilemma.
>
> I usually bring the bag inside if the temperature is expected to be
> below 20 degrees or above 90 degrees for a considerable length of time,
> and also try to wait at least 20-30 minutes after entering the bowling
> center before using my best equipment if that particular ball has been
> in the car and exposed to extreme temperatures for some time. Have
> never had any mishaps or cracks, but still worry, cause most of the
> time 2 of my bowling balls ARE left in the trunk of the car.
>
> My question is.... is there a substantial danger to the balls in just
> BEING in a hot or cold car for a lengthy period of time, or is it only
> if they are actually put into use and hurled down the lanes within a
> very short time of having been brought in from the cold or hot climate
> outdoors? In other words, is the risk mainly from rapid temperature
> fluctuations, or can sitting in a cold or hot car cause problems even
> if the bowling balls are treated "gently" in the transition from hot to
> cold and otherwise?
>
> Don't know that there would be one right answer or an absolute one. No
> one is going to say there is no risk at all in leaving the balls
> exposed to the temperature extremes. But am interested in a general
> consensus of responses as to what most of you in the group know or
> believe as to the LEVEL of risk so long as the balls are given time to
> heat up or cool off gradually.
>
> Thanks,
> Larry
>




  
Date: 26 Dec 2004 15:13:56
From: netnews.comcast.net
Subject: Re: temperature risk to bowling ball?
The big issue would be the possible seperation of the core from the cover.
The materials are different and will expand/contract at different rates.
That difference can ruin the bond between the core and cover which can cause
it to shift and also the cover to be prone to cracking.
"Jimmy DeGazz" <DeGazz@rcn.com > wrote in message
news:5-2dncqCUsAPUVPcRVn-tw@rcn.net...
> I, myself, do not leave my equipment in the car. Have read in here many
> times about this. Cold temps especially will cause a 'thumb-sticking'
> problem. I do leave it in the trunk for an hour or two on a hot day to let
> it sweat out some oil. If you only bowl at one center, perhaps you should
> consider renting a locker. Most places charge $10.00 a year
>
> "1966olds" <news.20.1988@spamgourmet.com> wrote in message
> news:1104048854.058221.19120@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> > Am interested in assessing the level of risk from temperature extremes
> > on mainstream or recent model bowling balls (I have some very old
> > relics (LT48 and a Black Diamond for instance) that I don't worry much
> > about, but also several ranging in age from 2 weeks old to just a few
> > years.
> >
> > Have heard and read stories of bowling balls cracking or being
> > otherwise damaged by extreme heat and cold, and been cautioned by
> > pro-shop owners too. Living on a 3rd floor condo and not wanting to lug
> > my two ball bag up and down the stairs every day, nor wanting to risk
> > damage to my equipment poses a dilemma.
> >
> > I usually bring the bag inside if the temperature is expected to be
> > below 20 degrees or above 90 degrees for a considerable length of time,
> > and also try to wait at least 20-30 minutes after entering the bowling
> > center before using my best equipment if that particular ball has been
> > in the car and exposed to extreme temperatures for some time. Have
> > never had any mishaps or cracks, but still worry, cause most of the
> > time 2 of my bowling balls ARE left in the trunk of the car.
> >
> > My question is.... is there a substantial danger to the balls in just
> > BEING in a hot or cold car for a lengthy period of time, or is it only
> > if they are actually put into use and hurled down the lanes within a
> > very short time of having been brought in from the cold or hot climate
> > outdoors? In other words, is the risk mainly from rapid temperature
> > fluctuations, or can sitting in a cold or hot car cause problems even
> > if the bowling balls are treated "gently" in the transition from hot to
> > cold and otherwise?
> >
> > Don't know that there would be one right answer or an absolute one. No
> > one is going to say there is no risk at all in leaving the balls
> > exposed to the temperature extremes. But am interested in a general
> > consensus of responses as to what most of you in the group know or
> > believe as to the LEVEL of risk so long as the balls are given time to
> > heat up or cool off gradually.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Larry
> >
>
>