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Date: 01 Apr 2007 08:43:54
From: Shawn Robertson
Subject: new ball
I was thinking about buying a new ball. my current ball is a morich seek
& destroy and it is had to many games bowled on it and does not hook any
more. it is a poris type of cover stock that absorbs allot of oil and
stuff. and it is real beat up looking. my problem is, there are so many
balls to choose from, I don't know which one I want. also, I don't know
anything about drill patterns, so I have no idea what to tell my pro
shop guy. I suppose all I can do is have him watch me bowl and then have
him make the decision for me. I was wondering if there are more durable
balls on the market that don't absorb as much stuff as my current ball ?
if this is any help, I have a medium hook that I throw about 14.5 miles
per hour. any suggestions ?





 
Date: 01 Apr 2007 18:08:42
From: Darby
Subject: Re: new ball
My first suggestion is to have your pro shop resurface the ball. If you
haven't had that done yet, there will be a decided improvement in the
reaction for several resurfacings.
You could still get another new ball, but you could get one that reacts
differently for different conditions. Usually one ball isn't enough for all
of the conditions we run into if you bowl in more than one league, even if
you stay in the same bowling center.
Dar

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shawn Robertson" <spr27@webtv.net >

Subject: new ball


>I was thinking about buying a new ball. my current ball is a morich seek
> & destroy and it is had to many games bowled on it and does not hook any
> more. it is a porous type of cover stock that absorbs allot of oil and
> stuff. and it is real beat up looking. my problem is, there are so many
> balls to choose from, I don't know which one I want. also, I don't know
> anything about drill patterns, so I have no idea what to tell my pro
> shop guy. I suppose all I can do is have him watch me bowl and then have
> him make the decision for me. I was wondering if there are more durable
> balls on the market that don't absorb as much stuff as my current ball ?
> if this is any help, I have a medium hook that I throw about 14.5 miles
> per hour. any suggestions ?
>




 
Date: 01 Apr 2007 10:50:45
From: Mark
Subject: Re: new ball
On Apr 1, 1:08 pm, newsreader <w...@127.0.0.1 > wrote:
> wonder of that has anything to do with the manufacturers

If you buy maximum friction you typically get minimum durability. Just
like many other products with a wear surface. At the end of the day,
performance potential ain't cheap. It's also not always worth the
money but that is a different discussion.

For my pennies the mid-priced bowling gear from the major
manufacturers offers the best bang for the buck. It gives high
performace potential and is not costly enough that you are reluctant
to replace it when it wears out. And bowling balls do wear out. I also
make it a point to use older equipment for practice rather than piling
up the games on my "good stuff".

I used to live in Utah and still have a number of friends associated
with Storm and Roto Grip. As the OP is asking for advice on equipment
I'll offer my biased opinion. I've thrown Roto Grip exclusively for
the last 4-5 years and have noted that their equipment does not die as
quickly as some other equipment out there. RotoGrip chemistry is
distinct from Storm BTW. There are two balls that I recommend to
friends that don't dril lmuch equipment. First is the Roto Grip
Horizon Solid. This is a solid resin coverstock, strong core, medium
cost ball with high performance. Second is the Roto Grip Venus. This
is an inexpensive ball with a very good pearl partical coverstock with
a slightly weaker core. I use both of these balls every week and could
get along quite nicely if you took away all my other stuff (which
would require a large truck).

Also for the OP -- drilling patterns. Assuming you have a basic 3/4
roller most shops will put you into a basic label drilling. The pin
will be placed near the ring finger and the CG toward the middle of
your grip. This keeps the pin in the safe zone and eliminates need for
balance holes. Since you are replacing a high performance ball your
shop should insist on looking at that ball and checking your grip
prior to drilling anything new for you.

Hope that helps and good luck.

Mark






 
Date: 01 Apr 2007 17:08:36
From: newsreader
Subject: Re: new ball
You only got the one ball ?
if so and the old one suited your game and the conditions you usually
play on then just ask pro shop for an equivalant.
if you have a matched set of four it may still be the same answer !
You are right though a lot of modern balls have a quite low life span
(wonder of that has anything to do with the manufacturers). Picking one
with some life in it is worth the effort.
I don;t think anyone can tell you the best ball for you over the 'net.
A good instructor can help, A good pro shop guy that is also a good
instructor also needed. tell him your requirements, make sure he watches
your game and then go through the catalogues.

Shawn Robertson wrote:
> I was thinking about buying a new ball. my current ball is a morich seek
> & destroy and it is had to many games bowled on it and does not hook any
> more. it is a poris type of cover stock that absorbs allot of oil and
> stuff. and it is real beat up looking. my problem is, there are so many
> balls to choose from, I don't know which one I want. also, I don't know
> anything about drill patterns, so I have no idea what to tell my pro
> shop guy. I suppose all I can do is have him watch me bowl and then have
> him make the decision for me. I was wondering if there are more durable
> balls on the market that don't absorb as much stuff as my current ball ?
> if this is any help, I have a medium hook that I throw about 14.5 miles
> per hour. any suggestions ?
>


  
Date: 01 Apr 2007 18:03:56
From: litefrozen
Subject: Re: new ball
In article <oGRPh.616$x4.527@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net >, newsreader <whome@127.0.0.1> wrote:

> You only got the one ball ?
> if so and the old one suited your game and the conditions you usually
> play on then just ask pro shop for an equivalant.
> if you have a matched set of four it may still be the same answer !
> You are right though a lot of modern balls have a quite low life span
> (wonder of that has anything to do with the manufacturers). Picking one
> with some life in it is worth the effort.
> I don;t think anyone can tell you the best ball for you over the 'net.
> A good instructor can help, A good pro shop guy that is also a good
> instructor also needed. tell him your requirements, make sure he watches
> your game and then go through the catalogues.
>
> Shawn Robertson wrote:
> > I was thinking about buying a new ball. my current ball is a morich seek
> > & destroy and it is had to many games bowled on it and does not hook any
> > more. it is a poris type of cover stock that absorbs allot of oil and
> > stuff. and it is real beat up looking. my problem is, there are so many
> > balls to choose from, I don't know which one I want. also, I don't know
> > anything about drill patterns, so I have no idea what to tell my pro
> > shop guy. I suppose all I can do is have him watch me bowl and then have
> > him make the decision for me. I was wondering if there are more durable
> > balls on the market that don't absorb as much stuff as my current ball ?
> > if this is any help, I have a medium hook that I throw about 14.5 miles
> > per hour. any suggestions ?
> >

Also once you get a new ball dont abandon the old one.

If you think its oil saturated give it the warm water bath.Heres the info on how to do it from the morich site

Also have it resurfaced. if the pro shop there has one, have it put in a Haus or cook sphere machine.
It will true it up and get rid of any flat spots that night have developed. If not get it done on the spinner at least.

MoRich Product Cleaning Cleaning

First and foremost, we at MoRich strongly believe that preventative
maintenance is the key to a cover's longevity. Our recommendation is to
clean your bowling equipment after every use (practice, league, or
tournament session) with a quality ABC/WIBC approved cleaner. No matter
which cleaner you choose to use, we urge you to follow the directions
that come with the product. These companies specialize in cleaning
products and have done extensive research in bringing their products to
the marketplace.

We have received many inquires regarding the use of commercial cleaners
such as 409, Simple-Green, and Windex, to list just a few, in cleaning
our equipment. Though these products are specially formulated for
removing grease and oil components from surfaces, we DO NOT recommend
them as a cleaning product for our equipment.

Not to belabor the point, but we strongly recommend that you clean any
MoRich product (especially the aggressive coverstocks) after every use.
If a ball is used and then put away without cleaning, the oil and dirt
will have a greater chance to be absorbed deeper into the coverstock.
Whereas, if the ball is cleaned immediately after use, the oil and dirt
is limited to the surface and/or just below. We hear time and time
again from people who have lost hook in their equipment and swear they
clean it on a regular basis (often times they swear they clean it
immediately after use). Only when the question is asked (before and
after bowling?) is the real problem brought to light. Cleaning a ball
just before use is almost a useless procedure. Using any accepted
cleaner and towel will only clean a very fine layer and the deeper
trapped oil and dirt still remain. Please keep in mind that using dirty
towels only transfer dirt and oil back to the ball so please keep your
towels just as clean! Even performing a quick sanding will get a little
deeper, but won't remove the deeply rooted oil and dirt that was
neglected from the beginning.

So what to do? When this situation occurs, the cover needs a deep
cleaning of some kind to pull out as much oil and dirt from as deep as
possible without harming the coverstock. The one method we really like
is a simple "Hot Water Bath." This procedure helps to make sure that the
ball is not subjected to any extreme temperature changes that could
cause the cover to crack or separate from the core. Though the process
is easy, don't rush the steps! So here we go...

1. Have the ball wet sanded to about 400-grit to open the cover's
pores.
2. Fill a tub or bucket (5 gallon buckets work well) with hot tap
water and about 2-3 teaspoons of Dawn dish detergent.
3. Wash the ball using a wash cloth or a scotch brite pad (burgundy
or green) for a few minutes.
4. Remove the ball from the soapy water and rinse the tub (or bucket)
clean and refill it with hot water (no soap).
5. Place the ball in the water and wash it clean with a clean cloth
or new scotch brite pad. You will probably notice that a soapy film
will appear in the water. This is residue that was trapped in the
coverstock (much like the oil and dirt was).
6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 until no soapy residue remains, This make 2
or 3 times to achieve, depending upon the amount of soap that was used.
You don't want to use too much soap, but you need enough to cut through
the oil and dirt.
7. After the soap has been completely removed from the coverstock,
allow the ball to air dry at room temperature.
8. Have the ball wet sanded with 400-grit paper and then follow the
steps to bring it back to its factory finish as described in our
resurfacing section.

Once this procedure has been completed, make every attempt to clean the
ball after each session of use.

The ONE cleaning method that we strongly oppose is "baking" (or using
heat of any kind) a ball. Most of the methods that use "heat" as a
cleaning method suggest that this is a way to "revive" the ball after it
has lost an obvious amount of hook. For reviving a ball, we recommend
checking into Ebonite's "Hook Again" system. While we at MoRich have
not done much testing with it, we have heard many good things about it.
Again, check with your Pro Shop operator or the company itself.