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Date: 21 Jun 2007 13:09:50
From:
Subject: lane conditions
when I am bowling, I often run into poor lane conditions. I find it
hard to throw strikes when the oil is pushed up into back third of the
lane. unless you are bowling league, I guess you are shit out of luck.





 
Date: 27 Jun 2007 22:42:46
From: Robert A. Zanol
Subject: Re: lane conditions
I don't want you to think I am putting you down when I say this, for I truly
am not. I used to think & say the same things you are now, until someone set
me straight. I was told by a PBA member whom I respect that first of all
bowling is a game of adjustments. From frame to frame, lane to lane, center
to center, condition to condition. If I wanted to be "good" at this game I
needed to learn how to adjust to any condition. Then and only then could I
call myself "good". I was prompted to join a scratch league which didn't
have the house shot and was a little different each week. After 3 weeks of
being humbled and humiliated I asked someone to help me. Now 10 years later
you haven't heard me complain about lane conditions for a good amount of
years. Even if the shot is "challenging" (i never say poor) there is a way
to score and it is up to me to find it. Besides the playing field is level
because the competition is bowling on the same condition also. I have come
to learn that there is always a shot, but the question is whether I will
find it or not. I have learned to never blame the lane condition for my poor
performance because it is my inability to adjust that is the root cause of
my poor performance. It is a lot easier to cast the blame outward away from
oneself, but once you know the truth you can never do that again and look
yourself in the mirror.

This is what makes the game I love truly challenging and keeps me coming
back. If I had to bowl on the same shot week after week, month after month
and year after year I would literally be able to bowl blindfolded. There is
no sense of accomplishment or challenge in that. I would rather average a
185 on a tough condition rather than a 220 on a gimme shot.

RAZ
<spr272000@netzero.net > wrote in message
news:1182456590.260238.314630@q69g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
> when I am bowling, I often run into poor lane conditions. I find it
> hard to throw strikes when the oil is pushed up into back third of the
> lane. unless you are bowling league, I guess you are shit out of luck.
>





  
Date: 28 Jun 2007 09:04:22
From: newsreader
Subject: Re: lane conditions
Robert A. Zanol wrote:
> I don't want you to think I am putting you down when I say this, for I truly
> am not. I used to think & say the same things you are now, until someone set
> me straight. I was told by a PBA member whom I respect that first of all
> bowling is a game of adjustments. From frame to frame, lane to lane, center
> to center, condition to condition. If I wanted to be "good" at this game I
> needed to learn how to adjust to any condition. Then and only then could I
> call myself "good". I was prompted to join a scratch league which didn't
> have the house shot and was a little different each week. After 3 weeks of
> being humbled and humiliated I asked someone to help me. Now 10 years later
> you haven't heard me complain about lane conditions for a good amount of
> years. Even if the shot is "challenging" (i never say poor) there is a way
> to score and it is up to me to find it. Besides the playing field is level
> because the competition is bowling on the same condition also. I have come
> to learn that there is always a shot, but the question is whether I will
> find it or not. I have learned to never blame the lane condition for my poor
> performance because it is my inability to adjust that is the root cause of
> my poor performance. It is a lot easier to cast the blame outward away from
> oneself, but once you know the truth you can never do that again and look
> yourself in the mirror.
>
> This is what makes the game I love truly challenging and keeps me coming
> back. If I had to bowl on the same shot week after week, month after month
> and year after year I would literally be able to bowl blindfolded. There is
> no sense of accomplishment or challenge in that. I would rather average a
> 185 on a tough condition rather than a 220 on a gimme shot.
>
> RAZ
Indeed. A large number of bowlers do not know how to read oil. Of those
that have some idea of reading the oil not all have a game plan.
Then adjustments come into play - as you say.
Walled conditions and hook-in-a-box balls is just a fun game. The
skilled game is miles away from that. So far away that it is a different
game !! It has been said here many times.

But there are plenty of people who just want the fun game.


 
Date: 22 Jun 2007 09:57:29
From:
Subject: Re: lane conditions
On Jun 22, 5:07 am, newsreader <w...@127.0.0.1 > wrote:
> Gotta agree. A LOT of bowlers depend on fresh league conditions and
> having the ball read the lane. Few, in my experience can read the oil
> well themselves.
> This is one of the reasons why tougher conditions drop scores - not only
> are they inherently lower scoring conditions only the more knowledgeable
> (and able) bowlers will be able to get the most out of them.
> The challenge in bowling is to 'play the changing lanes'.
> With walled condition and hook in a box balls this means a lot of high
> scores on house conditions are lost on the tough stuff.
>
> having said that open bowling can produce a very patchy 'pattern' out
> there - then it gets rally tough. but it is tough for everyone and
> therefore fair. If a bowler only has one shot then they have limited
> potential to deal with different conditions.
>
> how many scratch bowlers go out there and use an established and
> repeatable method to read the oil ?
> how many have a game plan depending on what they read on the lane ?
> how many have developed the skills and knowledge to be versatile - a
> handful of adjustments can be combined in many ways to produce a LOT of
> different ball reactions from the same ball, more than most people
> realise. But if the physical game is 'narrow' and depends on 'ball and a
> wall' then these are probably not achievable.
>
> IMV it is derived in large part from the equipment wars - the integrity
> of the game has suffered so much that many bowlers have a false sense of
> the game. Having said that there is nothing at all in the equipment wars
> that actually forces a bowler to stop developing their skills and
> knowledge. For the hobby bowler why should they invest the time and
> effort though ? there is no reason to. But every bowler should recognise
> their limitations and decide if they want to put the effort in or not.
> If they do find a good coach and have at it - there is a lot of
> satisfaction to be gained on the journey.
>
> If you bowl in a scratch league you should be asking the house to put
> down the tough stuff - and to vary it. But few do. QED.
>
>
>
> Ken Zwyers wrote:
> > Spr:
>
> > You need to consider changing your expectations. You're expressing the
> > opinion that league lane conditions are the norm, and that having more oil
> > on the back end is wrong.
>
> > On the contrary, it's the opposite. Non-league lane conditions are much
> > more challenging, not because they're unfair, but because league lane
> > conditions are made easier in order to promote higher scores. League lane
> > conditions (some say) unfairly raise scores by making it easier for a miss
> > to the right of the mark (for righties) to come back to the pocket, while
> > misses to the left of the mark will slide further, and still have a chance
> > to hit the pocket. By the time that the oil has been pushed all around
> > (during non-league time), this advantage has been lost. In other words, the
> > true measure of a bowler's ability is more realistically how they do on oil
> > patterns that do not give an advantage. League lane conditions give an
> > advantage similar to playing basketball, and shooting at a hoop that's
> > one-and-one-half times the normal size.
>
> > In case you think that I'm trying to put you down, that's not the case.
> > I'll use myself as an example. For the past five years, my average has been
> > between 198 and 203. However, when I went to Nationals for the first time
> > this past April, on the tougher (but fairer) lane conditions, I averaged 174
> > for 9 games. A guy who has a 215 average in my league ended up averaging
> > just below 200 for nine games at the national tournament.
>
> > Anyway, that's my $0.02. Thanks for listening.
>
> > Ken Zwyers
>
> > <spr272...@netzero.net> wrote in message
> >news:1182456590.260238.314630@q69g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
> >> when I am bowling, I often run into poor lane conditions. I find it
> >> hard to throw strikes when the oil is pushed up into back third of the
> >> lane. unless you are bowling league, I guess you are shit out of luck.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I do try many different marks and aproach spots when I bowl but, I
have the most success aiming around the five board and standing on the
right side of the lane. I seem to put more strikes together from that
posistion than ant other spot on the lane. one style that I do not
like to do and only try if nothing else is working, is the curve ball.
standing on the left side of the lane and aiming to the right. I don't
like having to change my plant foot posistion at the last second. I
prefer the traditional hook over the curve. I would much rather chang
balls or speeds on the right side than have to move to the left of
center.



  
Date: 22 Jun 2007 17:14:50
From: newsreader
Subject: Re: lane conditions
spr272000@netzero.net wrote:
>
> I do try many different marks and aproach spots when I bowl but, I
> have the most success aiming around the five board and standing on the
> right side of the lane. I seem to put more strikes together from that
> posistion than ant other spot on the lane. one style that I do not
> like to do and only try if nothing else is working, is the curve ball.
> standing on the left side of the lane and aiming to the right. I don't
> like having to change my plant foot posistion at the last second. I
> prefer the traditional hook over the curve. I would much rather chang
> balls or speeds on the right side than have to move to the left of
> center.
>

see a good qualified coach - no one can help you with your own game
sight unseen...


 
Date: 22 Jun 2007 08:33:04
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: lane conditions
> when I am bowling, I often run into poor lane conditions. I find it
> hard to throw strikes when the oil is pushed up into back third of the
> lane. unless you are bowling league, I guess you are shit out of luck.

In addition to the excellent observations so far, I strongly suggest
you SEEK OUT A COACH to help you "learn to cope, etc." This is the
best time of the year to get Extra Instruction, etc. regarding your
bowling.

A Certified Coach can help you learn to change hand positions @
delivery, help you learn different dilivery angles/lines, and in
general find out The Other Things that you can work on to get yourself
ready for the Next League Season that starts in September.

In the meantime, try doing some "intensive work" with your PLASTIC
BALL (i.e., White Dot) to hone your release and "straight delivery"
skills. Unless the lanes are "dry as the Sahara", using a
(relatively) non-hooking Plastic Ball will FORCE YOU to Find The Line
from foul line to the pocket (not to mention hone your spare skills -
especially those CORNER PINS). :)

Good luck....



 
Date: 21 Jun 2007 23:30:14
From: Ken Zwyers
Subject: Re: lane conditions
Spr:

You need to consider changing your expectations. You're expressing the
opinion that league lane conditions are the norm, and that having more oil
on the back end is wrong.

On the contrary, it's the opposite. Non-league lane conditions are much
more challenging, not because they're unfair, but because league lane
conditions are made easier in order to promote higher scores. League lane
conditions (some say) unfairly raise scores by making it easier for a miss
to the right of the mark (for righties) to come back to the pocket, while
misses to the left of the mark will slide further, and still have a chance
to hit the pocket. By the time that the oil has been pushed all around
(during non-league time), this advantage has been lost. In other words, the
true measure of a bowler's ability is more realistically how they do on oil
patterns that do not give an advantage. League lane conditions give an
advantage similar to playing basketball, and shooting at a hoop that's
one-and-one-half times the normal size.

In case you think that I'm trying to put you down, that's not the case.
I'll use myself as an example. For the past five years, my average has been
between 198 and 203. However, when I went to Nationals for the first time
this past April, on the tougher (but fairer) lane conditions, I averaged 174
for 9 games. A guy who has a 215 average in my league ended up averaging
just below 200 for nine games at the national tournament.

Anyway, that's my $0.02. Thanks for listening.

Ken Zwyers

<spr272000@netzero.net > wrote in message
news:1182456590.260238.314630@q69g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
> when I am bowling, I often run into poor lane conditions. I find it
> hard to throw strikes when the oil is pushed up into back third of the
> lane. unless you are bowling league, I guess you are shit out of luck.
>




  
Date: 22 Jun 2007 12:07:57
From: newsreader
Subject: Re: lane conditions
Gotta agree. A LOT of bowlers depend on fresh league conditions and
having the ball read the lane. Few, in my experience can read the oil
well themselves.
This is one of the reasons why tougher conditions drop scores - not only
are they inherently lower scoring conditions only the more knowledgeable
(and able) bowlers will be able to get the most out of them.
The challenge in bowling is to 'play the changing lanes'.
With walled condition and hook in a box balls this means a lot of high
scores on house conditions are lost on the tough stuff.

having said that open bowling can produce a very patchy 'pattern' out
there - then it gets rally tough. but it is tough for everyone and
therefore fair. If a bowler only has one shot then they have limited
potential to deal with different conditions.

how many scratch bowlers go out there and use an established and
repeatable method to read the oil ?
how many have a game plan depending on what they read on the lane ?
how many have developed the skills and knowledge to be versatile - a
handful of adjustments can be combined in many ways to produce a LOT of
different ball reactions from the same ball, more than most people
realise. But if the physical game is 'narrow' and depends on 'ball and a
wall' then these are probably not achievable.

IMV it is derived in large part from the equipment wars - the integrity
of the game has suffered so much that many bowlers have a false sense of
the game. Having said that there is nothing at all in the equipment wars
that actually forces a bowler to stop developing their skills and
knowledge. For the hobby bowler why should they invest the time and
effort though ? there is no reason to. But every bowler should recognise
their limitations and decide if they want to put the effort in or not.
If they do find a good coach and have at it - there is a lot of
satisfaction to be gained on the journey.

If you bowl in a scratch league you should be asking the house to put
down the tough stuff - and to vary it. But few do. QED.

Ken Zwyers wrote:
> Spr:
>
> You need to consider changing your expectations. You're expressing the
> opinion that league lane conditions are the norm, and that having more oil
> on the back end is wrong.
>
> On the contrary, it's the opposite. Non-league lane conditions are much
> more challenging, not because they're unfair, but because league lane
> conditions are made easier in order to promote higher scores. League lane
> conditions (some say) unfairly raise scores by making it easier for a miss
> to the right of the mark (for righties) to come back to the pocket, while
> misses to the left of the mark will slide further, and still have a chance
> to hit the pocket. By the time that the oil has been pushed all around
> (during non-league time), this advantage has been lost. In other words, the
> true measure of a bowler's ability is more realistically how they do on oil
> patterns that do not give an advantage. League lane conditions give an
> advantage similar to playing basketball, and shooting at a hoop that's
> one-and-one-half times the normal size.
>
> In case you think that I'm trying to put you down, that's not the case.
> I'll use myself as an example. For the past five years, my average has been
> between 198 and 203. However, when I went to Nationals for the first time
> this past April, on the tougher (but fairer) lane conditions, I averaged 174
> for 9 games. A guy who has a 215 average in my league ended up averaging
> just below 200 for nine games at the national tournament.
>
> Anyway, that's my $0.02. Thanks for listening.
>
> Ken Zwyers
>
> <spr272000@netzero.net> wrote in message
> news:1182456590.260238.314630@q69g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
>> when I am bowling, I often run into poor lane conditions. I find it
>> hard to throw strikes when the oil is pushed up into back third of the
>> lane. unless you are bowling league, I guess you are shit out of luck.
>>
>
>


 
Date: 21 Jun 2007 18:24:59
From: Beezlebub
Subject: Re: lane conditions
In article <1182456590.260238.314630@q69g2000hsb.googlegroups.com >,
spr272000@netzero.net wrote:

> when I am bowling, I often run into poor lane conditions. I find it
> hard to throw strikes when the oil is pushed up into back third of the
> lane. unless you are bowling league, I guess you are shit out of luck.

Don't take this personally, but I hear a lot of bowlers these days blame
non-perfect lane conditions for their inability to score well. It seems
that these days, bowling balls make up for many bowler's lack of skill.
When the ball can't perform, the bowler doesn't have the ability to
adjust his or her game as needed.

A good bowler can make a decent showing for himself on any lane
condition. If you want to improve your game, learn how to make
adjustments in yourself, not you gear, for various lane conditions.
Learning how to throw a down-and-in shot will give you a skill you can
use on wet backends.