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Date: 26 Feb 2007 19:22:49
From: Shawn Robertson
Subject: hot water soak
I tried the hot water soak method for drawing out the deep oil in my
ball. I use a morich "seek & destroy" ball. it is a dull finish particle
reactive. I used hot water and dish washing liquid first than after
rinsing off the ball and container that I soaked it in, I put the ball
back in hot water only (no soap) and continued soaking and rinsing in
hot water about six times until there were no signs of oil on the ball.
I was amazed at how much oil was removed from the ball. and I did not
even use a sanding pad before the initial soak. finally I used tracks
clean & dull ball cleaner. there were no visible signs of dirt or oil on
the towel I used for the cleaner. usually there is a significant amount
of black stuff on the towel. I have not bowled with the ball since doing
all this, but I expect good results.





 
Date: 26 Feb 2007 21:56:02
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: hot water soak
> Let us know what happens. I am curious, I have never done any of this stuff
> before and wonder what it will do for me."Shawn Robertson" <s...@webtv.net> wrote in message

I imagine you'll get a pretty deep "scalding" if you do it to
yourself. (big smirk!)

Oh...right...you're talking about your BALL! (smirk!)

Seriously: any method that extracts collected oil from a ball, while
not damaging the surface, is a valid way of ensuring you have many
sessions of Happy Bowling. :)

FWIW, there's a very recent thread on this subject - just do a search
on the phrase "dry heat" or "poaching" to find it. ;)

If it means anything, last Thursday I gave my Brunswick "Strike Zone"
a "baking session" - you should've seen the amount of oil that came
out of the ball during the (approx) 2 hour (and many interim wipings)
"session". The ball's surface ended up VERY TACKY (I used nothing
other than "409" to clean it) when it was cool and there wasn't any
underlying "sheen" to it (it's dull-sanded for good gripping). Tried
the ball on Friday night and I was AMAZED at how much "life" (i.e.
lane movement, flare, etc.) had returned. Even today (Monday league)
I was still getting lots of "movement" and hitting power. :)



  
Date: 27 Feb 2007 17:52:10
From: Darby
Subject: Re: hot water soak
If you are happy with your oil removing work that is the true test of the
value of doing so.....but one of our readers who used to post good info
regularly tested the "oil' that was oozing out and found that some of it was
the resins from the ball itself. He concluded that you are also slowly
turning your resin ball into a plastic ball. I just clean mine and resurface
since reading that.....no heat. :)
Dar

"PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com > wrote
>> Let us know what happens. I am curious, I have never done any of this
>> stuff
>> before and wonder what it will do for me."Shawn Robertson" <>
> Oh...right...you're talking about your BALL! (smirk!)
>
> Seriously: any method that extracts collected oil from a ball, while
> not damaging the surface, is a valid way of ensuring you have many
> sessions of Happy Bowling. :)
>
> FWIW, there's a very recent thread on this subject - just do a search
> on the phrase "dry heat" or "poaching" to find it. ;)
>
> If it means anything, last Thursday I gave my Brunswick "Strike Zone"
> a "baking session" - you should've seen the amount of oil that came
> out of the ball during the (approx) 2 hour (and many interim wipings)
> "session". The ball's surface ended up VERY TACKY (I used nothing
> other than "409" to clean it) when it was cool and there wasn't any
> underlying "sheen" to it (it's dull-sanded for good gripping). Tried
> the ball on Friday night and I was AMAZED at how much "life" (i.e.
> lane movement, flare, etc.) had returned. Even today (Monday league)
> I was still getting lots of "movement" and hitting power. :)
>




   
Date: 27 Feb 2007 20:17:30
From: Rowdy Yates
Subject: Re: hot water soak
2 years ago Carmen Salvino came to the place I work. Apparently an additive
that is used in the balls that the company he works for was seeping out. The
additive is a chlorinated wax. I didn't talk to him, but it was my
impression that some of the additives used to make the balls reactive leach
out of the ball. Trust me, I am not a chemist, I just work at a chemical
company near Chicago. I do know that working with chlorinated parrafins that
if you soak them in hot water or heat them, they will tend to be tacky until
they pick up enough contaminates to cover the tacky outer skin. But if you
heat the parrafin, the contaminates will fall off with some of the parrafin
as it oozes through the surface. Is that what is happening? Are particle
resin balls or reactive resin balls made with a chlorinated parrafin to give
them a waxy surface that helps them track through oil until they cannot be
"tacky" enough to track? I think Carmen was looking for an additive that
would not basically drip from the ball, not sure we ever helped him do what
he was looking to do. Please forgive my ignorance about terms involving ball
construction as I am really a ice when it comes to most things about
bowling. I bowled league bowling in the mid 80's overseas in military,
didn't bowl at all until 2005, now I bowl once a week in league plus a
little practice. My head spins when I hear guys talk bowling lingo. I just
thought I would share this, maybe it means something to those with more
extensive knowledge.
"Darby" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com > wrote in message
news:ed_Eh.18727$PD2.9980@attbi_s22...
> If you are happy with your oil removing work that is the true test of the
> value of doing so.....but one of our readers who used to post good info
> regularly tested the "oil' that was oozing out and found that some of it
> was the resins from the ball itself. He concluded that you are also slowly
> turning your resin ball into a plastic ball. I just clean mine and
> resurface since reading that.....no heat. :)
> Dar
>
> "PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com> wrote
>>> Let us know what happens. I am curious, I have never done any of this
>>> stuff
>>> before and wonder what it will do for me."Shawn Robertson" <>
>> Oh...right...you're talking about your BALL! (smirk!)
>>
>> Seriously: any method that extracts collected oil from a ball, while
>> not damaging the surface, is a valid way of ensuring you have many
>> sessions of Happy Bowling. :)
>>
>> FWIW, there's a very recent thread on this subject - just do a search
>> on the phrase "dry heat" or "poaching" to find it. ;)
>>
>> If it means anything, last Thursday I gave my Brunswick "Strike Zone"
>> a "baking session" - you should've seen the amount of oil that came
>> out of the ball during the (approx) 2 hour (and many interim wipings)
>> "session". The ball's surface ended up VERY TACKY (I used nothing
>> other than "409" to clean it) when it was cool and there wasn't any
>> underlying "sheen" to it (it's dull-sanded for good gripping). Tried
>> the ball on Friday night and I was AMAZED at how much "life" (i.e.
>> lane movement, flare, etc.) had returned. Even today (Monday league)
>> I was still getting lots of "movement" and hitting power. :)
>>
>
>




    
Date: 28 Feb 2007 05:33:38
From: Darby
Subject: Re: hot water soak
Rowdy, you're explaining things just fine. Thanks for the info. I think
Carmen was probably looking for a solution to the problem I was talking
about. Maybe they figured it out. The guy who used to post here about that
was a chemist in Australia. I hadn't heard that the ball manufacturers
solved the problem, but then I didn't know they were even aware of it. We
can hope.
Dar

"Rowdy Yates" <pl8do@comcast.net > wrote
>2 years ago Carmen Salvino came to the place I work. Apparently an additive
>that is used in the balls that the company he works for was seeping out.
>The additive is a chlorinated wax. I didn't talk to him, but it was my
>impression that some of the additives used to make the balls reactive leach
>out of the ball. Trust me, I am not a chemist, I just work at a chemical
>company near Chicago. I do know that working with chlorinated parrafins
>that if you soak them in hot water or heat them, they will tend to be tacky
>until they pick up enough contaminates to cover the tacky outer skin. But
>if you heat the parrafin, the contaminates will fall off with some of the
>parrafin as it oozes through the surface. Is that what is happening? Are
>particle resin balls or reactive resin balls made with a chlorinated
>parrafin to give them a waxy surface that helps them track through oil
>until they cannot be "tacky" enough to track? I think Carmen was looking
>for an additive that would not basically drip from the ball, not sure we
>ever helped him do what he was looking to do. Please forgive my ignorance
>about terms involving ball construction as I am really a ice when it
>comes to most things about bowling. I bowled league bowling in the mid 80's
>overseas in military, didn't bowl at all until 2005, now I bowl once a week
>in league plus a little practice. My head spins when I hear guys talk
>bowling lingo. I just thought I would share this, maybe it means something
>to those with more extensive knowledge.
> "Darby" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com> wrote in message
> news:ed_Eh.18727$PD2.9980@attbi_s22...
>> If you are happy with your oil removing work that is the true test of the
>> value of doing so.....but one of our readers who used to post good info
>> regularly tested the "oil' that was oozing out and found that some of it
>> was the resins from the ball itself. He concluded that you are also
>> slowly turning your resin ball into a plastic ball. I just clean mine and
>> resurface since reading that.....no heat. :)
>> Dar
>>
>> "PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com> wrote
>>>> Let us know what happens. I am curious, I have never done any of this
>>>> stuff
>>>> before and wonder what it will do for me."Shawn Robertson" <>
>>> Oh...right...you're talking about your BALL! (smirk!)
>>>
>>> Seriously: any method that extracts collected oil from a ball, while
>>> not damaging the surface, is a valid way of ensuring you have many
>>> sessions of Happy Bowling. :)
>>>
>>> FWIW, there's a very recent thread on this subject - just do a search
>>> on the phrase "dry heat" or "poaching" to find it. ;)
>>>
>>> If it means anything, last Thursday I gave my Brunswick "Strike Zone"
>>> a "baking session" - you should've seen the amount of oil that came
>>> out of the ball during the (approx) 2 hour (and many interim wipings)
>>> "session". The ball's surface ended up VERY TACKY (I used nothing
>>> other than "409" to clean it) when it was cool and there wasn't any
>>> underlying "sheen" to it (it's dull-sanded for good gripping). Tried
>>> the ball on Friday night and I was AMAZED at how much "life" (i.e.
>>> lane movement, flare, etc.) had returned. Even today (Monday league)
>>> I was still getting lots of "movement" and hitting power. :)
>>>
>>
>>
>
>




    
Date: 28 Feb 2007 05:21:21
From: litefrozen
Subject: Re: hot water soak
In article <fPCdnT5B7KGGe3nYnZ2dnUVZ_rSjnZ2d@comcast.com >, Rowdy Yates <pl8do@comcast.net> wrote:

> 2 years ago Carmen Salvino came to the place I work. Apparently an additive
> that is used in the balls that the company he works for was seeping out. The
> additive is a chlorinated wax. I didn't talk to him, but it was my
> impression that some of the additives used to make the balls reactive leach
> out of the ball. Trust me, I am not a chemist, I just work at a chemical
> company near Chicago. I do know that working with chlorinated parrafins that
> if you soak them in hot water or heat them, they will tend to be tacky until
> they pick up enough contaminates to cover the tacky outer skin. But if you
> heat the parrafin, the contaminates will fall off with some of the parrafin
> as it oozes through the surface. Is that what is happening? Are particle
> resin balls or reactive resin balls made with a chlorinated parrafin to give
> them a waxy surface that helps them track through oil until they cannot be
> "tacky" enough to track? I think Carmen was looking for an additive that
> would not basically drip from the ball, not sure we ever helped him do what
> he was looking to do. Please forgive my ignorance about terms involving ball
> construction as I am really a ice when it comes to most things about
> bowling. I bowled league bowling in the mid 80's overseas in military,
> didn't bowl at all until 2005, now I bowl once a week in league plus a
> little practice. My head spins when I hear guys talk bowling lingo. I just
> thought I would share this, maybe it means something to those with more
> extensive knowledge.
Balls are tacky because they have a High Coeff. of friction and they are porous. A waxy surface is
not doing that. Chlorinated paraffins are used as plasticizers they may well be used in balls, though
I havent seen them talked about being used in balls. A quick google of it show use in some bowling
products so it may be used.

Ok the heating ball debate just keeps going.
It started basicaly like this. They came out with reactive resin balls they hooked alot more than urethane.
One of reasons they hooked more was the the material drew oil away from the surface of the ball. Do the
porous nature of the material.

As time passed the materials used could absorb alot more oil. Then we started seeing ball death which was
mostly do to oil saturation of the coverstock.So people started trying to get the oil out. They saw the balls sweat
in hot cars and got the idea to heat them.

As this went on they started saying that the heat was not just making oil come out. But the "plasticizers" used in
the ball material. And if you lost the plasticizer the ball would stop hooking because thats what made it hook.

Well now thats changed now they say the ball stops hooking because the plasticizers, which are migrating to
surface of the ball and reducing the hook.( which I would go with the waxy surface here) Plus its getting oil soak too.

The problems with heating a ball is the use of dry heat also its sudden temp. chanes. People bake them in a oven to get the oil out and
if your not real carefull you'll mess the ball up bad. You'll crack it or warp it or the core will seperate etc.
There are a couple of machines designed to do it right that proshops have. your oven at home is not one of them.

Thast why someone came up with the "Hot water and Dawn" method its a fairly safe way to to get the oil out. It just warms
the ball evenly. The only real thing to watch for is not leaving the ball in the water to long or it might absorb some water.
if it did you would just have to let it dry out for awhile longer. Some people have said that after a hot water bath. The ball
took one or two games to start working, I think this is be cause of it just needing a longer drying time or not fulling getting
the soapy water out. For the most part everyone I've seen use the bath has said it works no harm done.

The best thing to keep a ball working at its peak is to clean it after you get done bowling. Give it a good deep cleaning with something like
clean'N dull once a week or so depending on how much you bowl. and a hot water bath once a month. plus maintain your surface texture.

And you will get alot more than 60 or 80 games. I have hundreds of games on mine.


 
Date: 26 Feb 2007 22:17:35
From: Rowdy Yates
Subject: Re: hot water soak
Let us know what happens. I am curious, I have never done any of this stuff
before and wonder what it will do for me.
"Shawn Robertson" <spr27@webtv.net > wrote in message
news:13554-45E3A409-829@storefull-3311.bay.webtv.net...
> I tried the hot water soak method for drawing out the deep oil in my
> ball. I use a morich "seek & destroy" ball. it is a dull finish particle
> reactive. I used hot water and dish washing liquid first than after
> rinsing off the ball and container that I soaked it in, I put the ball
> back in hot water only (no soap) and continued soaking and rinsing in
> hot water about six times until there were no signs of oil on the ball.
> I was amazed at how much oil was removed from the ball. and I did not
> even use a sanding pad before the initial soak. finally I used tracks
> clean & dull ball cleaner. there were no visible signs of dirt or oil on
> the towel I used for the cleaner. usually there is a significant amount
> of black stuff on the towel. I have not bowled with the ball since doing
> all this, but I expect good results.
>