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Date: 11 Feb 2007 16:15:56
From: Brian
Subject: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
I am a 172 bowler on a once week men's league. The weak part of my game is
and always was an inconsistent release. I am in good physical shape so
strength is not an issue. My question is can a wrist support help?

Thanks,

Brian in MI






 
Date: 18 Feb 2007 12:43:05
From: Ben
Subject: Re: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
"Brian" <sportsdadmi@yahoo.com > wrote in
news:JNmdnV02S7ATGlLYnZ2dnUVZ_h2pnZ2d@comcast.com:

> I am a 172 bowler on a once week men's league. The weak part of my
> game is and always was an inconsistent release. I am in good physical
> shape so strength is not an issue. My question is can a wrist support
> help?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Brian in MI
>
>

I agree with everything everyone said about seeking professional help...
But, one thing big, strong athletic people try to do is throw the ball
vs. letting the release occur as part of the natural arm swing. This
causes you to go around the ball and release it inconsistently. So...
Natural swing, bicept pointing at the target. No tension in the
hand.thumb. Practice practice. Because if you are gripping and throwing,
you will feel awkward at first.


  
Date: 18 Feb 2007 14:36:46
From: Brian
Subject: Re: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
Thanks for all the help! Going to practice tomorrow.

Brian

"Ben" <ben@spambait.com > wrote in message
news:Xns98DB4E8473749benspambaitcom@66.250.146.128...
> "Brian" <sportsdadmi@yahoo.com> wrote in
> news:JNmdnV02S7ATGlLYnZ2dnUVZ_h2pnZ2d@comcast.com:
>
>> I am a 172 bowler on a once week men's league. The weak part of my
>> game is and always was an inconsistent release. I am in good physical
>> shape so strength is not an issue. My question is can a wrist support
>> help?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Brian in MI
>>
>>
>
> I agree with everything everyone said about seeking professional help...
> But, one thing big, strong athletic people try to do is throw the ball
> vs. letting the release occur as part of the natural arm swing. This
> causes you to go around the ball and release it inconsistently. So...
> Natural swing, bicept pointing at the target. No tension in the
> hand.thumb. Practice practice. Because if you are gripping and throwing,
> you will feel awkward at first.




 
Date: 14 Feb 2007 17:12:10
From: Mark
Subject: Re: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
On Feb 11, 8:33 pm, "Brian" <sportsda...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> I thought it was from trying to much to lift up on the ball.

"Lift" really has no place in the modern release. A number of folks
still talk about lift because they learned to bowl in the 70s and 80s
and still think you need to impart big fingers and lift into the ball
to create hook. Sadly, if you are lifting up on the ball you are
essentially killing any chance to put revs and power into the ball.
You will end up with a ball that stands up early, reacts too strongly
to teh heads and hits like a tomato. There are some conditions that
require "loft" but loft is not the equivalent of lift. At your average
you should not be trying to use loft anyway (most probably).

The modern release is triggered by rotation around the ball at the
proper point in the downswing. To impart rotation (revs) you bring
your hand around the ball at release but you do not "hit up" on the
ball.

The very short videos of stroker and cranker on the link below will
show you what the desired result is.

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/kennmelvin/VStroker.Htm

You can google around for other videos and descriptions of today's
powerful releases.

As to wrist supports, there ae many good models out there. I advise
people to use them as training aids and to try not to become dependent
on them if possible. That is, use them to get your release where you
want it, create muscle memory and then put the wrist support away. The
models I suggest are the Striker, the Mongoose and the good old
Robby's (take the metal plate out for a minimal support).

I would suggest that before you invest in a strong wrist support that
you try to borrow a couple different models to test drive. Also, an
inconsistent release could well be due to a timing fault and have
little to do with your wrist position. Sounds like you are ready to
improve your game so allow me to echo the prior advice to try and find
someone decent to work with in your area. It's much easier to improve
at this game if a good coach is available to identify faults in your
game, help you correct those faults and work on new skills. It's also
helpful if you are able to practice regularly with focus on specific
parts of your game rather than just going bowling.

Good luck and I hope you can reach your objective!

MC



  
Date: 14 Feb 2007 21:30:32
From: Brian
Subject: Re: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
MC,

Thanks for the very informational reply! I have looked into a coach just a
couple of miles from me and will be making an appointment next week.
Thanks Again!

Brian in MI

"Mark" <twobowlers@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1171501930.496132.181720@k78g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> On Feb 11, 8:33 pm, "Brian" <sportsda...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> I thought it was from trying to much to lift up on the ball.
>
> "Lift" really has no place in the modern release. A number of folks
> still talk about lift because they learned to bowl in the 70s and 80s
> and still think you need to impart big fingers and lift into the ball
> to create hook. Sadly, if you are lifting up on the ball you are
> essentially killing any chance to put revs and power into the ball.
> You will end up with a ball that stands up early, reacts too strongly
> to teh heads and hits like a tomato. There are some conditions that
> require "loft" but loft is not the equivalent of lift. At your average
> you should not be trying to use loft anyway (most probably).
>
> The modern release is triggered by rotation around the ball at the
> proper point in the downswing. To impart rotation (revs) you bring
> your hand around the ball at release but you do not "hit up" on the
> ball.
>
> The very short videos of stroker and cranker on the link below will
> show you what the desired result is.
>
> http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/kennmelvin/VStroker.Htm
>
> You can google around for other videos and descriptions of today's
> powerful releases.
>
> As to wrist supports, there ae many good models out there. I advise
> people to use them as training aids and to try not to become dependent
> on them if possible. That is, use them to get your release where you
> want it, create muscle memory and then put the wrist support away. The
> models I suggest are the Striker, the Mongoose and the good old
> Robby's (take the metal plate out for a minimal support).
>
> I would suggest that before you invest in a strong wrist support that
> you try to borrow a couple different models to test drive. Also, an
> inconsistent release could well be due to a timing fault and have
> little to do with your wrist position. Sounds like you are ready to
> improve your game so allow me to echo the prior advice to try and find
> someone decent to work with in your area. It's much easier to improve
> at this game if a good coach is available to identify faults in your
> game, help you correct those faults and work on new skills. It's also
> helpful if you are able to practice regularly with focus on specific
> parts of your game rather than just going bowling.
>
> Good luck and I hope you can reach your objective!
>
> MC
>




 
Date: 11 Feb 2007 15:32:24
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
> I am a 172 bowler on a once week men's league. The weak part of my game is
> and always was an inconsistent release. I am in good physical shape so
> strength is not an issue. My question is can a wrist support help?

Before getting a wrist support, first verify your ball's drilling and
fit! until you're 100% sure the ball is COMFORTABLE in your hand,
there's no point in ontinuing. As USBC Gold-Certified Coach Susie
Minshew always says, "You can't out-coach a bad fit!"

Next, seek out a Certified Coach to observe your release. Chances are
he/she can point out where in the relase your "faults" occur. Again,
success here is predicated on ensuring the BALL FIT IS RIGHT.

Next, consult your doctor or a Physical Therapist for exercises to
improve your wrist strength. You need to maintain a solid wrist
position (i.e. no bending/breaking) at the release. In many cases,
once you "train" your wrist to maintain a firm, straight position,
everything will "fall into place" and you can then consider more
Coaching to learn how to "manipulate" your wrist position for Doing
Different Things with the ball at the release (i.e. more/less revs,
changing axis angle/rotation).

Finally, there are MANY, MANY types of wrist braces out there. They
range from simple gloves with metal "backing" (supporting) plates
(i.e. Columbia 300 "Pro Grip" glove:
http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/pro_grip/pro_grip_pro_wrist_glove_red__rh_.shtml)
to leather "wrist-encasing" (immobilizing) affairs (i.e. Robby's
"Plus": http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/robbys/robbys_leather_plus__rh_.shtml)
to "complex" adjustable "metal monsters" (i.e.
http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/robbys/robbys_revs__rh_.shtml).
While all of them have their strengths and weaknesses regarding
supporting/protecting the wrist, none of them will overcome poor
techniques (they usually MASK them - like a crutch or cane often
"masks" foot/leg/hip problems). Plus, all of them impose RESTRICTIONS
what you can do with your wrist at release (see above) AND it's all to
easy to become dependent on them. However, if one truly has wrist
problems (due to accident or injury), they're "godsends" for those who
want to keep bowling. Again, one must be aware of the limitations,
etc. imposed by each type of support.

Sorry to read so "long-winded". In final answer to your question, it
has to be "yes, a support CAN help 'stabilize' your wrist at the
release. HOWEVER, it can also 'introduce things' that might hamper
your game". The only way for you to really know if a wrist glove/
support is Right For You is to actually try a couple of different
supports. If you're lucky, your Pro Shop may have a good assortment
of supports in stock and might let you do a "try before you buy"
test. If the Pro Shoperator happens to be a certified Coach (many of
them are!), this would also be a good time for the Operator to observe
you and see if you really do 'need' a support.

I hope this helps a little bit. I do look forward to reading what
others have to say on this topic... :)



  
Date: 11 Feb 2007 20:33:04
From: Brian
Subject: Re: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
Thanks for the replies and interest. One thing I did not mention after
bowling 3 games Thursday night and 3 Friday afternoon I had some pain in my
wrist. I thought it was from trying to much to lift up on the ball. It is
still a little sore tonight but lots better compared to Friday night.

Thanks again!

Brian

"PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com > wrote in message
news:1171236744.486229.179350@s48g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
>> I am a 172 bowler on a once week men's league. The weak part of my game
>> is
>> and always was an inconsistent release. I am in good physical shape so
>> strength is not an issue. My question is can a wrist support help?
>
> Before getting a wrist support, first verify your ball's drilling and
> fit! until you're 100% sure the ball is COMFORTABLE in your hand,
> there's no point in ontinuing. As USBC Gold-Certified Coach Susie
> Minshew always says, "You can't out-coach a bad fit!"
>
> Next, seek out a Certified Coach to observe your release. Chances are
> he/she can point out where in the relase your "faults" occur. Again,
> success here is predicated on ensuring the BALL FIT IS RIGHT.
>
> Next, consult your doctor or a Physical Therapist for exercises to
> improve your wrist strength. You need to maintain a solid wrist
> position (i.e. no bending/breaking) at the release. In many cases,
> once you "train" your wrist to maintain a firm, straight position,
> everything will "fall into place" and you can then consider more
> Coaching to learn how to "manipulate" your wrist position for Doing
> Different Things with the ball at the release (i.e. more/less revs,
> changing axis angle/rotation).
>
> Finally, there are MANY, MANY types of wrist braces out there. They
> range from simple gloves with metal "backing" (supporting) plates
> (i.e. Columbia 300 "Pro Grip" glove:
> http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/pro_grip/pro_grip_pro_wrist_glove_red__rh_.shtml)
> to leather "wrist-encasing" (immobilizing) affairs (i.e. Robby's
> "Plus":
> http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/robbys/robbys_leather_plus__rh_.shtml)
> to "complex" adjustable "metal monsters" (i.e.
> http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/robbys/robbys_revs__rh_.shtml).
> While all of them have their strengths and weaknesses regarding
> supporting/protecting the wrist, none of them will overcome poor
> techniques (they usually MASK them - like a crutch or cane often
> "masks" foot/leg/hip problems). Plus, all of them impose RESTRICTIONS
> what you can do with your wrist at release (see above) AND it's all to
> easy to become dependent on them. However, if one truly has wrist
> problems (due to accident or injury), they're "godsends" for those who
> want to keep bowling. Again, one must be aware of the limitations,
> etc. imposed by each type of support.
>
> Sorry to read so "long-winded". In final answer to your question, it
> has to be "yes, a support CAN help 'stabilize' your wrist at the
> release. HOWEVER, it can also 'introduce things' that might hamper
> your game". The only way for you to really know if a wrist glove/
> support is Right For You is to actually try a couple of different
> supports. If you're lucky, your Pro Shop may have a good assortment
> of supports in stock and might let you do a "try before you buy"
> test. If the Pro Shoperator happens to be a certified Coach (many of
> them are!), this would also be a good time for the Operator to observe
> you and see if you really do 'need' a support.
>
> I hope this helps a little bit. I do look forward to reading what
> others have to say on this topic... :)
>




   
Date: 12 Feb 2007 11:02:15
From: moncho
Subject: Re: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
Remember that bowlers do not "perform" lift, you "create" lift based on
hand position near the bottom of the delivery. It is VERY important to
understand that. I cannot stress it enough.

PromptJock has it right when he states, "once you train your wrist to
maintain a firm, straight position, everything will fall into place."

I see so many "new" (young) bowlers try to keep their cupped way to long
or try to create hook whipping their forearm. That will just cause
major pain down the line along with inconsistency.

Watch the pro's on Sat and Sun, you will notice that they can get some
serious revs and it looks effortless. This is mostly because of hand
position and timing (there are other things also).

My problem as of late has been my wrist starts to break about 3/4 during
the downswing, but I have been practicing and working out timing and
balance issues.

Check www.bowl4fun.com and read some of his articles.

moncho

> Thanks for the replies and interest. One thing I did not mention after
> bowling 3 games Thursday night and 3 Friday afternoon I had some pain in my
> wrist. I thought it was from trying to much to lift up on the ball. It is
> still a little sore tonight but lots better compared to Friday night.
>
> Thanks again!
>
> Brian
>
> "PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com> wrote in message
> news:1171236744.486229.179350@s48g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
>>> I am a 172 bowler on a once week men's league. The weak part of my game
>>> is
>>> and always was an inconsistent release. I am in good physical shape so
>>> strength is not an issue. My question is can a wrist support help?
>> Before getting a wrist support, first verify your ball's drilling and
>> fit! until you're 100% sure the ball is COMFORTABLE in your hand,
>> there's no point in ontinuing. As USBC Gold-Certified Coach Susie
>> Minshew always says, "You can't out-coach a bad fit!"
>>
>> Next, seek out a Certified Coach to observe your release. Chances are
>> he/she can point out where in the relase your "faults" occur. Again,
>> success here is predicated on ensuring the BALL FIT IS RIGHT.
>>
>> Next, consult your doctor or a Physical Therapist for exercises to
>> improve your wrist strength. You need to maintain a solid wrist
>> position (i.e. no bending/breaking) at the release. In many cases,
>> once you "train" your wrist to maintain a firm, straight position,
>> everything will "fall into place" and you can then consider more
>> Coaching to learn how to "manipulate" your wrist position for Doing
>> Different Things with the ball at the release (i.e. more/less revs,
>> changing axis angle/rotation).
>>
>> Finally, there are MANY, MANY types of wrist braces out there. They
>> range from simple gloves with metal "backing" (supporting) plates
>> (i.e. Columbia 300 "Pro Grip" glove:
>> http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/pro_grip/pro_grip_pro_wrist_glove_red__rh_.shtml)
>> to leather "wrist-encasing" (immobilizing) affairs (i.e. Robby's
>> "Plus":
>> http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/robbys/robbys_leather_plus__rh_.shtml)
>> to "complex" adjustable "metal monsters" (i.e.
>> http://www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/robbys/robbys_revs__rh_.shtml).
>> While all of them have their strengths and weaknesses regarding
>> supporting/protecting the wrist, none of them will overcome poor
>> techniques (they usually MASK them - like a crutch or cane often
>> "masks" foot/leg/hip problems). Plus, all of them impose RESTRICTIONS
>> what you can do with your wrist at release (see above) AND it's all to
>> easy to become dependent on them. However, if one truly has wrist
>> problems (due to accident or injury), they're "godsends" for those who
>> want to keep bowling. Again, one must be aware of the limitations,
>> etc. imposed by each type of support.
>>
>> Sorry to read so "long-winded". In final answer to your question, it
>> has to be "yes, a support CAN help 'stabilize' your wrist at the
>> release. HOWEVER, it can also 'introduce things' that might hamper
>> your game". The only way for you to really know if a wrist glove/
>> support is Right For You is to actually try a couple of different
>> supports. If you're lucky, your Pro Shop may have a good assortment
>> of supports in stock and might let you do a "try before you buy"
>> test. If the Pro Shoperator happens to be a certified Coach (many of
>> them are!), this would also be a good time for the Operator to observe
>> you and see if you really do 'need' a support.
>>
>> I hope this helps a little bit. I do look forward to reading what
>> others have to say on this topic... :)
>>
>
>


 
Date: 11 Feb 2007 23:24:34
From: newsreader
Subject: Re: Wrist support for inconsistent release?
Brian wrote:
> I am a 172 bowler on a once week men's league. The weak part of my game is
> and always was an inconsistent release. I am in good physical shape so
> strength is not an issue. My question is can a wrist support help?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Brian in MI
>
>
Lots of possible reasons - a qualified experienced instructor needs to
look at you in flesh. Or you could post a few deliveries on youtube....