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Date: 07 Aug 2008 07:22:19
From:
Subject: Wrist is breaking back
In troubleshooting the many flaws in my game, one thing I've realized
is that I have a hard time keeping my hand under/behind the ball
because my wrist is breaking back as soon as I let the ball drop into
the swing. This happens even when I make a deliberate effort to keep
my wrist firm. I use a 14 lb. ball and I'd really rather not go any
lighter than that. Now for some questions:

Is this inherent to the use of conventional grip, due to less of the
ball being in-hand?

Could this simply be a "weak wrist" problem and might training with
weights help?

I'd rather not use a wrist device... But in case I decide to try one,
can you suggest a model that prevents break-back of the wrist WITHOUT
restricting side-to-side motion and does NOT look like some kind of
oversized robotic arm monstrosity? ;)

Any other tips?

Thanks for your time.




 
Date: 02 Sep 2008 06:33:15
From:
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
Dar,

I tried the old sock, it works great! The device is more comfortable
to wear now. Also, I can use the front part of the sock (which i cut
off to make the "wrist liner) as a "slide sock" over my shoe when the
approaches are sticky.

On Aug 25, 1:46=A0pm, "Darlene Block" <tenpinhawk...@mchsi.com > wrote:
> It is legal to take off and put on wrist devices during the game. Many
> bowlers take it off so that they can "break their wrist back" to throw at
> right side spares. (for right handers)
> =A0 =A0 =A0There are terry cloth hand covers that go under the wrist devi=
ce. They
> are good at absorbing sweat so that the device doesn't get smelly. You ca=
n
> also cut the heel and toe out of a sock and have an inexpensive hand cove=
r.
> The thumb goes into the heel, fingers through the toe. =A0 =A0:)
> Good luck.
> Dar
>


  
Date: 02 Sep 2008 15:57:30
From: Darlene Block
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
Good thinking. But I'm trying to picture what part you put over your shoe.
The toe isn't long enough and you want the part that normally goes over the
ankle to cover your wrist so it doesn't ride up. Why don't you go ahead and
use a whole sock for the sliding shoe, I do. :)
Dar

<electronic_dave@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:167578ed-e1f4-467d-8bf3-8e9758d771b0@59g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
Dar,

I tried the old sock, it works great! The device is more comfortable
to wear now. Also, I can use the front part of the sock (which i cut
off to make the "wrist liner) as a "slide sock" over my shoe when the
approaches are sticky.

On Aug 25, 1:46 pm, "Darlene Block" <tenpinhawk...@mchsi.com > wrote:
> It is legal to take off and put on wrist devices during the game. Many
> bowlers take it off so that they can "break their wrist back" to throw at
> right side spares. (for right handers)
> There are terry cloth hand covers that go under the wrist device. They
> are good at absorbing sweat so that the device doesn't get smelly. You can
> also cut the heel and toe out of a sock and have an inexpensive hand
> cover.
> The thumb goes into the heel, fingers through the toe. :)
> Good luck.
> Dar
>




 
Date: 27 Aug 2008 13:35:42
From: GenPounder
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
On Aug 27, 3:13=A0pm, PromptJock <102151.3...@compuserve.com > wrote:
> > On house shots, I would agree with most of your post.
>
> And that's what I was really trying to "aim at" (no pun? ;) ), since
> that's the condition the VAST MAJORITY of our "subscribership"
> encounter.
>
> "Sport" and "PBA Experience" conditions do, indeed, require ACCURACY,
> ACCURACY, and ACCURACY in targeting and speed, as some here have
> related. :)
>
> > For all single and 2 pin spares, a plastic spare ball is a must. =A0For
> > 3 or more, that is up to the bowler. =A0I have found that I will use my
> > strike ball and just cut the hook down a tad by putting less axis
> > rotation on the ball and throwing it a tad harder.
>
> No disagreement there. =A0Just be CAREFUL on the 3-6-10 (2-4-7 for left-
> wingers) as your HOOK ball can end-up CHOPPING the forward pin,
> leaving the back two while the STRAIGHT ball can end-up chopping one
> or more of the BACK TWO and just leaving the front one. =A0Believe me:
> I've done both, as well as just picked-off the MIDDLE one (6) while
> leaving the front and back (3 and 10) pins untouched - no mean feat!

On fence shots, I cut down on my hook to try to prevent hooking
through the middle. If I am bowling on a house pattern, I will cut my
hook down from my strike shot and aim like I am shooting for a 10 pin
(for the 3-6-10). Works fairly well. If I am bowling on basically
anything else, I will move my feet 3 boards left and throw my normal
shot.


 
Date: 27 Aug 2008 13:13:08
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
> On house shots, I would agree with most of your post.

And that's what I was really trying to "aim at" (no pun? ;) ), since
that's the condition the VAST MAJORITY of our "subscribership"
encounter.

"Sport" and "PBA Experience" conditions do, indeed, require ACCURACY,
ACCURACY, and ACCURACY in targeting and speed, as some here have
related. :)

> For all single and 2 pin spares, a plastic spare ball is a must. =A0For
> 3 or more, that is up to the bowler. =A0I have found that I will use my
> strike ball and just cut the hook down a tad by putting less axis
> rotation on the ball and throwing it a tad harder.

No disagreement there. Just be CAREFUL on the 3-6-10 (2-4-7 for left-
wingers) as your HOOK ball can end-up CHOPPING the forward pin,
leaving the back two while the STRAIGHT ball can end-up chopping one
or more of the BACK TWO and just leaving the front one. Believe me:
I've done both, as well as just picked-off the MIDDLE one (6) while
leaving the front and back (3 and 10) pins untouched - no mean feat!


 
Date: 27 Aug 2008 13:02:03
From: GenPounder
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
On Aug 27, 2:41=A0pm, PromptJock <102151.3...@compuserve.com > wrote:
> > > Congrats! betcha wish you coulda had the 6th and 8th frames back,
> > > right? ;)
>
> > Yeah, but I'm not too disappointed. But imagine if I had converted
> > those spares and had NOT choked on the last shot of the 10th. The
> > score would have been pretty respectable by nearly any standard. That
> > makes me wonder if the conventional wisdom about not being able to
> > score with a straight shot is not entirely true... or if I just got
> > lucky.
>
> No, I don't think you "got lucky" - you simply demonstrated SUPERIOR
> SHOOTING SKILLS to everyone there! :)
>
> To wit: in the "proper hands", straight balls can be just as "deadly"
> as "bendy" balls. =A0The main advantage of "bendy" balls is they don't
> need as much ACCURACY as straight balls as they rely primarlily on the
> OIL PATTERN to "get them to the pocket." =A0In fact, the next time
> you're at league (or even at "practice"), count the number of SPLITS
> and 10-PIN LEAVES from "bendy" balls that seemingly "slam" into the
> pocket. =A0You'll find they're relatively common. =A0If you go towww.bowl=
.com
> and peruse the "ball motion study" stuff, you'll learn interesting
> stuff about "bendy" balls and how they're not always "god's gift to
> bowling, etc."
>
> OTOH, STRAIGHT balls ** REQUIRE ** the bowler to have "pin-point" (pin-
> board?) accuracy in targeting, trajectory (ball path) and SPEED to
> properly hit the pocket (either one!) to ensure you get a strike (we
> won't even go into PICKING UP SPARES here. ;) ). =A0"Bendy" bowlers,
> while they do have the advantage of being able to "mix-up" the pins
> more due to ball rotation/spin influences, suffer the heartache of
> seeing more splits and single-pin leaves on seemingly good pocket hits
> (see above).
>
> Sadly, too many "bendy" bowlers are COMPLETELY LOST when it comes to
> delivering a STRAIGHT BALL to pick-up critical single-pin spares,
> especially at those pesky 6 and 10 pins (4 and 7 for left-wingers),
> and to even attempt trying to convert the "easier" splits (3-10, 2-7,
> 5-10, 5-7). =A0Such is the lot of delivering todays' "forgiving" balls
> on "forgiving" house patterns, but even then ACCURACY PREVAILS if you
> want to excel.
>
> A little shameless plug: I always advise those I coach to use a
> PLASTIC BALL for 1 or 2 games during their practice time so they can
> develop ACCURATE STRAIGHT-BALL SHOTS for the aforementioned corner-pin
> spares. =A0It's also "good practice" to get "intimate" with your PLASTIC
> ball Just In Case you encounter a house that doesn't put down much (if
> any?) oil on their lanes. =A0One can be surprised how many boards a
> "White Dot", delivered with a "stroker" release, can cover (bend) on
> such dry conditions! =A0Ditto for when you encounter super-wet
> conditions that "swamp" one's "bendiest" ball: an accurately delivered
> "White Dot" can be deadlier than your regular "super-bend, etc."
> strike ball (I know - I've been there many times! :) ).
>
> In summary: it's not A Bad Thing to have a plastic ball for STRAIGHT
> shots and a "bendy" ball for Every Other Shot (i.e., first ball).
> However, it's MORE ADVANTAGEOUS knowing how to accurately, etc. toss
> the PLASTIC ball because that accuracy, etc. WILL TRANSLATE to even
> better shooting with the "bendy" ball. :)

On house shots, I would agree with most of your post. On a sport
shot, accuracy is a must. If you are throwing a hook ball on a sport
shot, you don't have the miss area that you do on a house shot. On a
house shot, pitch the ball 2 boards too far out? It will come back
harder. Pull the ball a board? It will hold in the oil. If you are
bowling on the Shark, Scorpion, or any of the other named patterns or
even the pattern at Nationals, there is next to 0 miss area.

For all single and 2 pin spares, a plastic spare ball is a must. For
3 or more, that is up to the bowler. I have found that I will use my
strike ball and just cut the hook down a tad by putting less axis
rotation on the ball and throwing it a tad harder.


 
Date: 27 Aug 2008 12:41:45
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
> > Congrats! betcha wish you coulda had the 6th and 8th frames back,
> > right? ;)
>
> Yeah, but I'm not too disappointed. But imagine if I had converted
> those spares and had NOT choked on the last shot of the 10th. The
> score would have been pretty respectable by nearly any standard. That
> makes me wonder if the conventional wisdom about not being able to
> score with a straight shot is not entirely true... or if I just got
> lucky.

No, I don't think you "got lucky" - you simply demonstrated SUPERIOR
SHOOTING SKILLS to everyone there! :)

To wit: in the "proper hands", straight balls can be just as "deadly"
as "bendy" balls. The main advantage of "bendy" balls is they don't
need as much ACCURACY as straight balls as they rely primarlily on the
OIL PATTERN to "get them to the pocket." In fact, the next time
you're at league (or even at "practice"), count the number of SPLITS
and 10-PIN LEAVES from "bendy" balls that seemingly "slam" into the
pocket. You'll find they're relatively common. If you go to www.bowl.com
and peruse the "ball motion study" stuff, you'll learn interesting
stuff about "bendy" balls and how they're not always "god's gift to
bowling, etc."

OTOH, STRAIGHT balls ** REQUIRE ** the bowler to have "pin-point" (pin-
board?) accuracy in targeting, trajectory (ball path) and SPEED to
properly hit the pocket (either one!) to ensure you get a strike (we
won't even go into PICKING UP SPARES here. ;) ). "Bendy" bowlers,
while they do have the advantage of being able to "mix-up" the pins
more due to ball rotation/spin influences, suffer the heartache of
seeing more splits and single-pin leaves on seemingly good pocket hits
(see above).

Sadly, too many "bendy" bowlers are COMPLETELY LOST when it comes to
delivering a STRAIGHT BALL to pick-up critical single-pin spares,
especially at those pesky 6 and 10 pins (4 and 7 for left-wingers),
and to even attempt trying to convert the "easier" splits (3-10, 2-7,
5-10, 5-7). Such is the lot of delivering todays' "forgiving" balls
on "forgiving" house patterns, but even then ACCURACY PREVAILS if you
want to excel.

A little shameless plug: I always advise those I coach to use a
PLASTIC BALL for 1 or 2 games during their practice time so they can
develop ACCURATE STRAIGHT-BALL SHOTS for the aforementioned corner-pin
spares. It's also "good practice" to get "intimate" with your PLASTIC
ball Just In Case you encounter a house that doesn't put down much (if
any?) oil on their lanes. One can be surprised how many boards a
"White Dot", delivered with a "stroker" release, can cover (bend) on
such dry conditions! Ditto for when you encounter super-wet
conditions that "swamp" one's "bendiest" ball: an accurately delivered
"White Dot" can be deadlier than your regular "super-bend, etc."
strike ball (I know - I've been there many times! :) ).

In summary: it's not A Bad Thing to have a plastic ball for STRAIGHT
shots and a "bendy" ball for Every Other Shot (i.e., first ball).
However, it's MORE ADVANTAGEOUS knowing how to accurately, etc. toss
the PLASTIC ball because that accuracy, etc. WILL TRANSLATE to even
better shooting with the "bendy" ball. :)


 
Date: 27 Aug 2008 06:17:23
From:
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
On Aug 27, 2:17=A0am, PromptJock <102151.3...@compuserve.com > wrote:
> In addition to the alky-wipes, stock up on ** 90+% Isopropyl Alcohol
> ** (available from your local drugstore - 99 cents/bottle or so).
> This way, you can give the device a "proper cleaning" using a paper
> towel wetted with the isopropyl. =A0It'll remove whatever the alky-wipes
> might miss (they only use 70% isopropyl). :)

Yep, I always keep some 91% around. Matter of fact, it's what I use to
clean my bowling ball.

> > X =A0X =A0X =A06/ =A07/ =A08- =A06/ =A081 =A0X =A0XX4 (Yes, I choked on=
that last shot).
>
> Congrats! betcha wish you coulda had the 6th and 8th frames back,
> right? ;)


Yeah, but I'm not too disappointed. But imagine if I had converted
those spares and had NOT choked on the last shot of the 10th. The
score would have been pretty respectable by nearly any standard. That
makes me wonder if the conventional wisdom about not being able to
score with a straight shot is not entirely true... or if I just got
lucky.


 
Date: 26 Aug 2008 23:17:08
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
> Dar, great idea about making a low-cost liner out of a sock! I did try
> a liner and found that I prefer the feel of "riding bareback." I carry
> alcohol wipes in my bag to wipe off the inside of the wrist device to
> keep it from getting funky.

In addition to the alky-wipes, stock up on ** 90+% Isopropyl Alcohol
** (available from your local drugstore - 99 cents/bottle or so).
This way, you can give the device a "proper cleaning" using a paper
towel wetted with the isopropyl. It'll remove whatever the alky-wipes
might miss (they only use 70% isopropyl). :)

> PJock, my initial impression is that the Ebonite and Columbia are both
> fine wrist devices. I'm a little more inclined to favor the Columbia
> at the moment since earlier today, I bowled my first 200 while wearing
> it (and using a conventional grip plastic ball and a straight shot to
> the pocket).
>
> X =A0X =A0X =A06/ =A07/ =A08- =A06/ =A081 =A0X =A0XX4 (Yes, I choked on t=
hat last shot).

Congrats! betcha wish you coulda had the 6th and 8th frames back,
right? ;)


 
Date: 26 Aug 2008 19:02:20
From:
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
Dar, great idea about making a low-cost liner out of a sock! I did try
a liner and found that I prefer the feel of "riding bareback." I carry
alcohol wipes in my bag to wipe off the inside of the wrist device to
keep it from getting funky.

PJock, my initial impression is that the Ebonite and Columbia are both
fine wrist devices. I'm a little more inclined to favor the Columbia
at the moment since earlier today, I bowled my first 200 while wearing
it (and using a conventional grip plastic ball and a straight shot to
the pocket).

X X X 6/ 7/ 8- 6/ 81 X XX4 (Yes, I choked on that last shot).


 
Date: 25 Aug 2008 11:48:57
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
> Now for a rules question: is it legal to take wrist devices on and off
> during the course of a game?

Yes. Just don't throw it at anything/anybody in frustration, etc. -
you ** COULD ** be cited for "unsportsmanlike conduct"...

Please keep us apprised of your progress, specifically in WHICH DEVICE
helps you the most. :)


 
Date: 25 Aug 2008 08:01:50
From:
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
As always, thanks for the replies. Here's an update:

I ended up buying three different wrist supports to try out in the
upcoming season:

1. A simple neoprene "wrap" like you might find in drug stores or
sporting goods stores. This does not prevent the wrist from breaking
back nor does it hinder movement in any significant way, but it does
provide some support. I've actually taken to wearing it on my non-
bowling wrist to reduce strain from picking up/holding the ball on the
approach. I play guitar so avoiding strain on my left-hand tendons is
also important to me.

2. A Columbia 300 "Classic Wrist Device." This is reminiscent of the
wrist supports of the '70s. It stiffens the wrist very effectively but
does not extend to the knuckles and fingers. The fingers are totally
free. It includes two metal plates, front and rear, either of which
may be removed. This device is closest to what I had in mind with my
original inquiry.

3. An Ebonite "Striker." This supports the wrist and hand all the way
up to the knuckles and the base of the fingers. Allegedly, it's
similar to the Mongoose.

Now for a rules question: is it legal to take wrist devices on and off
during the course of a game?



  
Date: 25 Aug 2008 17:46:55
From: Darlene Block
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
It is legal to take off and put on wrist devices during the game. Many
bowlers take it off so that they can "break their wrist back" to throw at
right side spares. (for right handers)
There are terry cloth hand covers that go under the wrist device. They
are good at absorbing sweat so that the device doesn't get smelly. You can
also cut the heel and toe out of a sock and have an inexpensive hand cover.
The thumb goes into the heel, fingers through the toe. :)
Good luck.
Dar

<electronic_dave@hotmail.com > wrote

> As always, thanks for the replies. Here's an update:
>
> I ended up buying three different wrist supports to try out in the
> upcoming season:
>
> 1. A simple neoprene "wrap" like you might find in drug stores or
> sporting goods stores. This does not prevent the wrist from breaking
> back nor does it hinder movement in any significant way, but it does
> provide some support. I've actually taken to wearing it on my non-
> bowling wrist to reduce strain from picking up/holding the ball on the
> approach. I play guitar so avoiding strain on my left-hand tendons is
> also important to me.
>
> 2. A Columbia 300 "Classic Wrist Device." This is reminiscent of the
> wrist supports of the '70s. It stiffens the wrist very effectively but
> does not extend to the knuckles and fingers. The fingers are totally
> free. It includes two metal plates, front and rear, either of which
> may be removed. This device is closest to what I had in mind with my
> original inquiry.
>
> 3. An Ebonite "Striker." This supports the wrist and hand all the way
> up to the knuckles and the base of the fingers. Allegedly, it's
> similar to the Mongoose.
>
> Now for a rules question: is it legal to take wrist devices on and off
> during the course of a game?
>




 
Date: 11 Aug 2008 15:59:32
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
> I've decided that I'm going to buy a wrist device just to help my game
> for now while I work on developing wrist strength. My question is,
> what is a good "minimal" wrist device, something that will just
> prevent my wrist from breaking back while being minimally restrictive
> otherwise?

A good "minimal" device would probably be a "neoprene" wrap that you
can buy at almost any drug store (in the same aisle as ACE bandages,
etc.).

The other thing I can suggest would be a bowling glove with a simple
"backing" plate Iif you can stand wearing a glove while bowling) or
possibly a "Mongoose" positioner. The "Mongoose" (http://
www.bowlersparadise.com/shop/wristsupport_gloves/mongoose/mongoose_lifter_black__rh_.shtml)
is probably what you want. OWEVER, be aware that the back of your
wrist/forearm may SWEAT PROFUSELY as the black material covering the
"Mongoose" tends to hold in body heat rather well.

Finally, see if your local center's Pro Shop will let you try some of
their supports and let you decide what may work best. In the
meantime, I've given you what I think will help and I hope it's
useful, etc. :)


 
Date: 10 Aug 2008 23:23:07
From:
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
Thanks to all for the excellent replies!

I've decided that I'm going to buy a wrist device just to help my game
for now while I work on developing wrist strength. My question is,
what is a good "minimal" wrist device, something that will just
prevent my wrist from breaking back while being minimally restrictive
otherwise?

I've just spent a couple of hours doing some "window shopping" online,
and the variety of wrist devices available is mind-boggling, and many
of them do more than I need them to do. The closest thing to ideal
would be nothing more than a sturdy splint with two padded straps, but
I haven't found anything quite like that. The simple designs of the
Wristmaster, the Ebonite Positioner or the Brunswick Positioners
(Sport, Command, etc.) look close to what I want, but I'd love to hear
your opinions and experiences.


 
Date: 08 Aug 2008 08:55:47
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
As suggested, you can immediately start using a wrist brace to help
hold your wrist in position. While indeed helpful, such devices also
SEVERELY RESTRICT your ability to make "hand adjustments" when you
need to.

Therefore, please accept these ideas IN ADDITION to using a brace:

1) Get yourself a 5# (or so) dumbbell at a sporting goods store.
While holding it in your bowling hand, rest your bowling forearm on a
table, desk, sofa arm, or whatever, ensuring it's fairly flat against
the surface, with the dumbbelled wrist HANGING OVER THE EDGE. Now, do
sets of FORWARD (wrist goes down then up) and REVERSE (wrist goes up
then down) ** WRIST ** CURLS (do 10 of each, repeating 4 or 5 times in
alternation: 10 forward curls, rest, 10 reverse curls, rest, repeat).
AT NO TIME allow the elbow to bend - only make the UPPER AND LOWER
FOREARM MUSCLES do the work. You WILL "feel a burn", but if you keep
at it your wrist "musculature" will improve!

2) Take your bowling hand and LAT IT FLAT on a table, desk, or
similar flat surface. SPREAD YOUR FINGERS AND THUMB out as wide as
they will go. Now, while keeping the hand flat, ** SLOWLY ** PIVOT
YOUR FOREARM UPWARDS, taking it perpendicular to your palm AND THEN
SOME (i.e., hyperflex it). DO NOT OVER-FLEX the wrist - only take it
as far as it will go! Your wrist WILL "pop and burn", and your palm/
fingers may tingle. This is normal! Hold this position for about 10
seonds, then return the arm to flat against the surface (DO NOT let
the hand come off the surface or let the fingers "relax"). Repeat 5
times. Do this a few times in the day and, as you do it, you'll find
your wrist will get LOOSER and MORE FLEXIBLE, which is a good thing.

3) BEFORE you do any bowling, do this modification of 2) above:
place both palms together (like you're going to pray) and spread your
fingers apart on both hands (all fingers/thumbs should be touching
each other). Now, bring both palms DOWNWARD in front of your chest,
while simultaneously bringing your arms straight to the side. When
done, your arms/hands should look something like this: _______


 
Date: 07 Aug 2008 17:04:18
From: Dave Allen
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
I'm not the worlds best bowler so what I use might not work for you.
I went to the local Wal-Mart and bought a carpel tunnel wrist brace
that fit either wrist. I have added 10 pins to my average using it.
Dave Allen and Good Luck and good bowling.

electronic_dave@hotmail.com wrote:
> In troubleshooting the many flaws in my game, one thing I've realized
> is that I have a hard time keeping my hand under/behind the ball
> because my wrist is breaking back as soon as I let the ball drop into
> the swing. This happens even when I make a deliberate effort to keep
> my wrist firm. I use a 14 lb. ball and I'd really rather not go any
> lighter than that. Now for some questions:
>
> Is this inherent to the use of conventional grip, due to less of the
> ball being in-hand?
>
> Could this simply be a "weak wrist" problem and might training with
> weights help?
>
> I'd rather not use a wrist device... But in case I decide to try one,
> can you suggest a model that prevents break-back of the wrist WITHOUT
> restricting side-to-side motion and does NOT look like some kind of
> oversized robotic arm monstrosity? ;)
>
> Any other tips?
>
> Thanks for your time.
** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **


 
Date: 07 Aug 2008 16:29:51
From: Darlene Block
Subject: Re: Wrist is breaking back
Without seeing you I have to go from personal observations of other people.
It sounds like you are not using a relaxed armswing, but are muscling the
ball. Let the ball sit in your hand like a bird, tight enough for it not to
get away, but don't squeeze it so tight you'll kill it. Let the ball be the
end of the swing with the hand just holding it there. You are twisting your
wrist/hand, forcing the ball around. Get out of the way and let the ball do
the work, not your misinformed hand.
BTW, The guys who cover a lot of boards do bend their wrist, but get it
straightened out at release.
I believe in wrist devices, many don't. But I use a Pro-Release, one of
those robotic arms, so you don't want to know what I think would be a good
one. :)
Others here will have advice you may want to consider too.
Good luck.
Dar
<electronic_dave@hotmail.com > wrote
> In troubleshooting the many flaws in my game, one thing I've realized
> is that I have a hard time keeping my hand under/behind the ball
> because my wrist is breaking back as soon as I let the ball drop into
> the swing. This happens even when I make a deliberate effort to keep
> my wrist firm. I use a 14 lb. ball and I'd really rather not go any
> lighter than that. Now for some questions:
>
> Is this inherent to the use of conventional grip, due to less of the
> ball being in-hand?
>
> Could this simply be a "weak wrist" problem and might training with
> weights help?
>
> I'd rather not use a wrist device... But in case I decide to try one,
> can you suggest a model that prevents break-back of the wrist WITHOUT
> restricting side-to-side motion and does NOT look like some kind of
> oversized robotic arm monstrosity? ;)
>
> Any other tips?
>
> Thanks for your time.