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Date: 02 Jun 2007 22:48:49
From: litefrozen
Subject: The Roger Dalkin Interview
The Roger Dalkin Interview for those who have not seen it.

http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=610089

Rolling with eye on future
Dalkin wants to focus on tournament competition
By GARY D'AMATO
gdamato@journalsentinel.com
Posted: May 23, 2007

Greendale - On a shelf behind Roger Dalkin's desk at United States
Bowling Congress headquarters, partially hidden behind stacks of papers
and family photos, are two heavy, bronze statues.

They bear the inscription "Morehead Patterson Award," and they are to
college bowling what the Heisman Trophy is to NCAA Division I football.

Dalkin, of Greendale, won his pair of Pattersons in the early 1970s as a
two-time collegiate bowler of the year at Georgia Tech. He also won the
World Bowling Cup in 1971 in Hong Kong, bowled a 300 game in 1993 and
still competes at a high level.

But it is as an administrator that the 57-year-old Dalkin has made his
biggest contribution to the sport. As former executive director of the
American Bowling Congress, he championed the largest merger of
non-profit associations in U.S. history (the ABC, Women's International
Bowling Congress, Young American Bowling Alliance and USA Bowling) and
was hired as the first CEO of the new United States Bowling Congress in
2004.

Far from satisfied with the status quo, Dalkin has a clear - and some
would say controversial - vision for the future of bowling.

He predicts the continued erosion of a membership that has been in
decline for 25 years but doesn't stress about it, saying the USBC still
needs to "thin the herd." The organization has 2.5 million members and
the number eventually could fall below 1 million, Dalkin said.

Why? Going forward, the USBC will stress the competitive aspect of
bowling instead of the recreational side. The emphasis will be on high
school, college and amateur tournaments and Sport Bowling leagues, in
which bowlers compete on difficult and tightly regulated lane
conditions.

For too long, Dalkin said, the industry tried to arrest declining
numbers by marketing the sport as a recreational activity.

"We've in essence convinced the general population it's a great, fun
game. And it is," he said. "But in doing so, we've totally negated the
athletic skills necessary to be a top-level bowler. It's a conundrum we
have."

Instead of fighting for every member, the USBC will draw a "line of
demarcation" between recreational bowling and competitive bowling. Such
lines are understood in other sports. Weekend golfers know they're not
good enough to take on Tiger Woods, for instance, but many 220-average
league bowlers have been deluded into thinking they're as good as the
PBA Tour stars by proprietors and equipment manufacturers who have made
the game too easy.

"A lot of people say, 'You're telling bowlers they're not as good as
they think they are,' " Dalkin said. "Well, yeah, that's what we're
telling them."

As scores soared through the 1980s and 1990s and once-rare 300 games and
800 series became commonplace, the mainstream media stopped treating
bowling as a sport. The men's tour continues to struggle, the women's
tour went belly up and coverage has all but disappeared from newspaper
sports sections.

"Fifty years ago bowling was one of the top stories in sports," Dalkin
said. "There were pages and pages of coverage in the newspaper. What
changed? The pins are still 60 feet away and there are still 10 of them.

"We have convinced the world we're a fun, entertaining recreation and in
doing so we've managed to tarnish our sport. And we need to change
that."

In 15 years, Dalkin said, the bowling landscape will look dramatically
different. Leagues, which once accounted for 80% of all games played,
currently account for 47% and probably will bottom out at 20% to 25%.
USBC membership will continue to shrink, but serious bowlers will "join
and renew willingly because they support the mission and the vision of
what we're trying to do."

"I see an industry as a whole that's a lot bigger but a lot different,"
he added. "There will be far more casual bowlers, more unscheduled
bowling activity and less structured leagues but more tournaments. There
will be a clear demarcation between sport and recreation.

"And I'd like to think we'll have a full page in the Milwaukee Journal
Sentinel."

Dalkin admitted his vision was not an easy sell to members who have done
things the same way for decades. Whatever bowling is and will become,
it's still primarily a grass-roots sport and changes in how the USBC
administers it must be approved by delegates at the USBC national
convention.

"It's a radical directional change," Dalkin said. "Our delegates are
going to have trouble with it. Our associations are going to have
trouble with it. I told them last year at the convention, 'Here's where
we're going.'

"It may be that membership in Greater Milwaukee will drop 50%, but it
will be a committed membership, paying reasonable dues to get services
that are germane to them."

It's that kind of out-of-the-box thinking that would lead some to
conclude Dalkin came to the USBC from outside the sport. But he's a
lifelong bowler and has been involved in the game at every level.

He ran the collegiate bowling center at Illinois State University and
was a member of the Greensboro (N.C.) Bowling Association board of
directors in the early 1980s, when he ran successful insurance agencies.

He also spent five years as the ABC / WIBC collegiate division manager;
was the ABC group executive-technical from 1985-'89; and was the ABC's
executive director from 1997 until the merger in 2004.

Dalkin pushed for the merger even though there was no guarantee he would
be hired as CEO. One of his first tasks was to tell 17 longtime
employees their services no longer were required.

"That's one of the things a merger does," he said. "I could have easily
been one of those people. The board could have said, 'We didn't hire
you. Sorry. You're out the door.' But I supported the merger because it
was the right thing to do for bowling."

Roseann Kuhn, former executive director of the WIBC and now the USBC
chief officer of tournaments and events, said the board made the right
choice in Dalkin.

"First of all, he's got the passion to be a leader and a CEO of a
company this big," she said. "He's been all over the organization and
has a well-rounded knowledge of the organization. And he's a very, very
good speaker who can convince people of the direction we need to go."

Timothy W. Payne, USBC chief officer of delivery, said Dalkin was
"eminently fair" and a "visionary who has a good idea of where he thinks
the USBC needs to be 10 years from now."

"One could argue that if you're going to merge (established)
organizations, you go outside and find a change agent to come in vs.
taking one of the incumbents and elevating him," Payne said. "There's a
concern that it's ingrained. That wasn't much of a risk with Roger, if
you knew him."

Dalkin is optimistic about the future of bowling, pointing out that
Brunswick has been building an average of one new bowling center per
month in the U.S.

"I think bowling is very healthy," he said. "But we have to understand
that our industry has changed. The proprietors have to change their
outlook and the USBC has to change how we promote and how we administer
the sport."




 
Date: 15 Jun 2007 16:55:28
From: caroball
Subject: Re: The Roger Dalkin Interview
On Jun 2, 11:44?pm, Tony R Smith <tonyrsm...@myrealbox.com > wrote:
> It's about time someone started talking sense at Headquarters! I have
> been saying for years that bowling has become recreational instead of a
> sport. Lane oil is "conditioner" not bumpers for adult bowlers! I have
> just two words.... FLAT OIL!!!
>
>
>
> litefrozen wrote:
> > The Roger Dalkin Interview for those who have not seen it.
>
> > http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=610089
>
> > Rolling with eye on future
> > Dalkin wants to focus on tournament competition
> > By GARY D'AMATO
> > gdam...@journalsentinel.com
> > Posted: May 23, 2007
>
> > Greendale - On a shelf behind Roger Dalkin's desk at United States
> > Bowling Congress headquarters, partially hidden behind stacks of papers
> > and family photos, are two heavy, bronze statues.
>
> > They bear the inscription "Morehead Patterson Award," and they are to
> > college bowling what the Heisman Trophy is to NCAA Division I football.
>
> > Dalkin, of Greendale, won his pair of Pattersons in the early 1970s as a
> > two-time collegiate bowler of the year at Georgia Tech. He also won the
> > World Bowling Cup in 1971 in Hong Kong, bowled a 300 game in 1993 and
> > still competes at a high level.
>
> > But it is as an administrator that the 57-year-old Dalkin has made his
> > biggest contribution to the sport. As former executive director of the
> > American Bowling Congress, he championed the largest merger of
> > non-profit associations in U.S. history (the ABC, Women's International
> > Bowling Congress, Young American Bowling Alliance and USA Bowling) and
> > was hired as the first CEO of the new United States Bowling Congress in
> > 2004.
>
> > Far from satisfied with the status quo, Dalkin has a clear - and some
> > would say controversial - vision for the future of bowling.
>
> > He predicts the continued erosion of a membership that has been in
> > decline for 25 years but doesn't stress about it, saying the USBC still
> > needs to "thin the herd." The organization has 2.5 million members and
> > the number eventually could fall below 1 million, Dalkin said.
>
> > Why? Going forward, the USBC will stress the competitive aspect of
> > bowling instead of the recreational side. The emphasis will be on high
> > school, college and amateur tournaments and Sport Bowling leagues, in
> > which bowlers compete on difficult and tightly regulated lane
> > conditions.
>
> > For too long, Dalkin said, the industry tried to arrest declining
> > numbers by marketing the sport as a recreational activity.
>
> > "We've in essence convinced the general population it's a great, fun
> > game. And it is," he said. "But in doing so, we've totally negated the
> > athletic skills necessary to be a top-level bowler. It's a conundrum we
> > have."
>
> > Instead of fighting for every member, the USBC will draw a "line of
> > demarcation" between recreational bowling and competitive bowling. Such
> > lines are understood in other sports. Weekend golfers know they're not
> > good enough to take on Tiger Woods, for instance, but many 220-average
> > league bowlers have been deluded into thinking they're as good as the
> > PBA Tour stars by proprietors and equipment manufacturers who have made
> > the game too easy.
>
> > "A lot of people say, 'You're telling bowlers they're not as good as
> > they think they are,' " Dalkin said. "Well, yeah, that's what we're
> > telling them."
>
> > As scores soared through the 1980s and 1990s and once-rare 300 games and
> > 800 series became commonplace, the mainstream media stopped treating
> > bowling as a sport. The men's tour continues to struggle, the women's
> > tour went belly up and coverage has all but disappeared from newspaper
> > sports sections.
>
> > "Fifty years ago bowling was one of the top stories in sports," Dalkin
> > said. "There were pages and pages of coverage in the newspaper. What
> > changed? The pins are still 60 feet away and there are still 10 of them.
>
> > "We have convinced the world we're a fun, entertaining recreation and in
> > doing so we've managed to tarnish our sport. And we need to change
> > that."
>
> > In 15 years, Dalkin said, the bowling landscape will look dramatically
> > different. Leagues, which once accounted for 80% of all games played,
> > currently account for 47% and probably will bottom out at 20% to 25%.
> > USBC membership will continue to shrink, but serious bowlers will "join
> > and renew willingly because they support the mission and the vision of
> > what we're trying to do."
>
> > "I see an industry as a whole that's a lot bigger but a lot different,"
> > he added. "There will be far more casual bowlers, more unscheduled
> > bowling activity and less structured leagues but more tournaments. There
> > will be a clear demarcation between sport and recreation.
>
> > "And I'd like to think we'll have a full page in the Milwaukee Journal
> > Sentinel."
>
> > Dalkin admitted his vision was not an easy sell to members who have done
> > things the same way for decades. Whatever bowling is and will become,
> > it's still primarily a grass-roots sport and changes in how the USBC
> > administers it must be approved by delegates at the USBC national
> > convention.
>
> > "It's a radical directional change," Dalkin said. "Our delegates are
> > going to have trouble with it. Our associations are going to have
> > trouble with it. I told them last year at the convention, 'Here's where
> > we're going.'
>
> > "It may be that membership in Greater Milwaukee will drop 50%, but it
> > will be a committed membership, paying reasonable dues to get services
> > that are germane to them."
>
> > It's that kind of out-of-the-box thinking that would lead some to
> > conclude Dalkin came to the USBC from outside the sport. But he's a
> > lifelong bowler and has been involved in the game at every level.
>
> > He ran the collegiate bowling center at Illinois State University and
> > was a member of the Greensboro (N.C.) Bowling Association board of
> > directors in the early 1980s, when he ran successful insurance agencies.
>
> > He also spent five years as the ABC / WIBC collegiate division manager;
> > was the ABC group executive-technical from 1985-'89; and was the ABC's
> > executive director from 1997 until the merger in 2004.
>
> > Dalkin pushed for the merger even though there was no guarantee he would
> > be hired as CEO. One of his first tasks was to tell 17 longtime
> > employees their services no longer were required.
>
> > "That's one of the things a merger does," he said. "I could have easily
> > been one of those people. The board could have said, 'We didn't hire
> > you. Sorry. You're out the door.' But I supported the merger because it
> > was the right thing to do for bowling."
>
> > Roseann Kuhn, former executive director of the WIBC and now the USBC
> > chief officer of tournaments and events, said the board made the right
> > choice in Dalkin.
>
> > "First of all, he's got the passion to be a leader and a CEO of a
> > company this big," she said. "He's been all over the organization and
> > has a well-rounded knowledge of the organization. And he's a very, very
> > good speaker who can convince people of the direction we need to go."
>
> > Timothy W. Payne, USBC chief officer of delivery, said Dalkin was
> > "eminently fair" and a "visionary who has a good idea of where he thinks
> > the USBC needs to be 10 years from now."
>
> > "One could argue that if you're going to merge (established)
> > organizations, you go outside and find a change agent to come in vs.
> > taking one of the incumbents and elevating him," Payne said. "There's a
> > concern that it's ingrained. That wasn't much of a risk with Roger, if
> > you knew him."
>
> > Dalkin is optimistic about the future of bowling, pointing out that
> > Brunswick has been building an average of one new bowling center per
> > month in the U.S.
>
> > "I think bowling is very healthy," he said. "But we have to understand
> > that our industry has changed. The proprietors have to change their
> > outlook and the USBC has to change how we promote and how we administer
> > the sport."- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

ball companies will put out a contract on you




  
Date: 15 Jun 2007 19:07:55
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: The Roger Dalkin Interview
Won't be the first. ;-)

caroball wrote:
> On Jun 2, 11:44?pm, Tony R Smith <tonyrsm...@myrealbox.com> wrote:
>> It's about time someone started talking sense at Headquarters! I have
>> been saying for years that bowling has become recreational instead of a
>> sport. Lane oil is "conditioner" not bumpers for adult bowlers! I have
>> just two words.... FLAT OIL!!!

>
> ball companies will put out a contract on you
>
>


 
Date: 02 Jun 2007 21:44:16
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: The Roger Dalkin Interview
It's about time someone started talking sense at Headquarters! I have
been saying for years that bowling has become recreational instead of a
sport. Lane oil is "conditioner" not bumpers for adult bowlers! I have
just two words.... FLAT OIL!!!

litefrozen wrote:
> The Roger Dalkin Interview for those who have not seen it.
>
> http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=610089
>
> Rolling with eye on future
> Dalkin wants to focus on tournament competition
> By GARY D'AMATO
> gdamato@journalsentinel.com
> Posted: May 23, 2007
>
> Greendale - On a shelf behind Roger Dalkin's desk at United States
> Bowling Congress headquarters, partially hidden behind stacks of papers
> and family photos, are two heavy, bronze statues.
>
> They bear the inscription "Morehead Patterson Award," and they are to
> college bowling what the Heisman Trophy is to NCAA Division I football.
>
> Dalkin, of Greendale, won his pair of Pattersons in the early 1970s as a
> two-time collegiate bowler of the year at Georgia Tech. He also won the
> World Bowling Cup in 1971 in Hong Kong, bowled a 300 game in 1993 and
> still competes at a high level.
>
> But it is as an administrator that the 57-year-old Dalkin has made his
> biggest contribution to the sport. As former executive director of the
> American Bowling Congress, he championed the largest merger of
> non-profit associations in U.S. history (the ABC, Women's International
> Bowling Congress, Young American Bowling Alliance and USA Bowling) and
> was hired as the first CEO of the new United States Bowling Congress in
> 2004.
>
> Far from satisfied with the status quo, Dalkin has a clear - and some
> would say controversial - vision for the future of bowling.
>
> He predicts the continued erosion of a membership that has been in
> decline for 25 years but doesn't stress about it, saying the USBC still
> needs to "thin the herd." The organization has 2.5 million members and
> the number eventually could fall below 1 million, Dalkin said.
>
> Why? Going forward, the USBC will stress the competitive aspect of
> bowling instead of the recreational side. The emphasis will be on high
> school, college and amateur tournaments and Sport Bowling leagues, in
> which bowlers compete on difficult and tightly regulated lane
> conditions.
>
> For too long, Dalkin said, the industry tried to arrest declining
> numbers by marketing the sport as a recreational activity.
>
> "We've in essence convinced the general population it's a great, fun
> game. And it is," he said. "But in doing so, we've totally negated the
> athletic skills necessary to be a top-level bowler. It's a conundrum we
> have."
>
> Instead of fighting for every member, the USBC will draw a "line of
> demarcation" between recreational bowling and competitive bowling. Such
> lines are understood in other sports. Weekend golfers know they're not
> good enough to take on Tiger Woods, for instance, but many 220-average
> league bowlers have been deluded into thinking they're as good as the
> PBA Tour stars by proprietors and equipment manufacturers who have made
> the game too easy.
>
> "A lot of people say, 'You're telling bowlers they're not as good as
> they think they are,' " Dalkin said. "Well, yeah, that's what we're
> telling them."
>
> As scores soared through the 1980s and 1990s and once-rare 300 games and
> 800 series became commonplace, the mainstream media stopped treating
> bowling as a sport. The men's tour continues to struggle, the women's
> tour went belly up and coverage has all but disappeared from newspaper
> sports sections.
>
> "Fifty years ago bowling was one of the top stories in sports," Dalkin
> said. "There were pages and pages of coverage in the newspaper. What
> changed? The pins are still 60 feet away and there are still 10 of them.
>
> "We have convinced the world we're a fun, entertaining recreation and in
> doing so we've managed to tarnish our sport. And we need to change
> that."
>
> In 15 years, Dalkin said, the bowling landscape will look dramatically
> different. Leagues, which once accounted for 80% of all games played,
> currently account for 47% and probably will bottom out at 20% to 25%.
> USBC membership will continue to shrink, but serious bowlers will "join
> and renew willingly because they support the mission and the vision of
> what we're trying to do."
>
> "I see an industry as a whole that's a lot bigger but a lot different,"
> he added. "There will be far more casual bowlers, more unscheduled
> bowling activity and less structured leagues but more tournaments. There
> will be a clear demarcation between sport and recreation.
>
> "And I'd like to think we'll have a full page in the Milwaukee Journal
> Sentinel."
>
> Dalkin admitted his vision was not an easy sell to members who have done
> things the same way for decades. Whatever bowling is and will become,
> it's still primarily a grass-roots sport and changes in how the USBC
> administers it must be approved by delegates at the USBC national
> convention.
>
> "It's a radical directional change," Dalkin said. "Our delegates are
> going to have trouble with it. Our associations are going to have
> trouble with it. I told them last year at the convention, 'Here's where
> we're going.'
>
> "It may be that membership in Greater Milwaukee will drop 50%, but it
> will be a committed membership, paying reasonable dues to get services
> that are germane to them."
>
> It's that kind of out-of-the-box thinking that would lead some to
> conclude Dalkin came to the USBC from outside the sport. But he's a
> lifelong bowler and has been involved in the game at every level.
>
> He ran the collegiate bowling center at Illinois State University and
> was a member of the Greensboro (N.C.) Bowling Association board of
> directors in the early 1980s, when he ran successful insurance agencies.
>
> He also spent five years as the ABC / WIBC collegiate division manager;
> was the ABC group executive-technical from 1985-'89; and was the ABC's
> executive director from 1997 until the merger in 2004.
>
> Dalkin pushed for the merger even though there was no guarantee he would
> be hired as CEO. One of his first tasks was to tell 17 longtime
> employees their services no longer were required.
>
> "That's one of the things a merger does," he said. "I could have easily
> been one of those people. The board could have said, 'We didn't hire
> you. Sorry. You're out the door.' But I supported the merger because it
> was the right thing to do for bowling."
>
> Roseann Kuhn, former executive director of the WIBC and now the USBC
> chief officer of tournaments and events, said the board made the right
> choice in Dalkin.
>
> "First of all, he's got the passion to be a leader and a CEO of a
> company this big," she said. "He's been all over the organization and
> has a well-rounded knowledge of the organization. And he's a very, very
> good speaker who can convince people of the direction we need to go."
>
> Timothy W. Payne, USBC chief officer of delivery, said Dalkin was
> "eminently fair" and a "visionary who has a good idea of where he thinks
> the USBC needs to be 10 years from now."
>
> "One could argue that if you're going to merge (established)
> organizations, you go outside and find a change agent to come in vs.
> taking one of the incumbents and elevating him," Payne said. "There's a
> concern that it's ingrained. That wasn't much of a risk with Roger, if
> you knew him."
>
> Dalkin is optimistic about the future of bowling, pointing out that
> Brunswick has been building an average of one new bowling center per
> month in the U.S.
>
> "I think bowling is very healthy," he said. "But we have to understand
> that our industry has changed. The proprietors have to change their
> outlook and the USBC has to change how we promote and how we administer
> the sport."