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Date: 25 May 2008 16:47:00
From:
Subject: Sliding, aka "Wood Is Good"
The importance of sliding is, no doubt, common knowledge among
advanced bowlers, but it seems a worthwhile topic to raise for the
benefit of "developing" bowlers like myself. I'd like to relate
something I discovered in my own game.

I usually practice at a new house with synthetic lanes and approaches,
but every now and then I'll work out at one of the older local houses
that are equipped with wood. Generally, I bowl much better on the
wooden lanes--and until recently, I figured it was due to how my ball
was reacting with the lane surface, variation in oiling patterns used
by the different houses, etc. But now I believe my problem lies on the
nearer side of the foul line.

You see, yesterday I was practicing on wooden lanes and after making a
string of good shots, I happened to look down at my feet just after
releasing the ball. My slide foot was in "textbook" position, just
behind the foul line and pointing at my target. I realized that this
almost never happens at my regular house; I usually end up short of
the foul line with my foot (and the bowling ball!) pointing in the
wrong direction. I used to think this was due to incompetence on my
part, some shortcoming of my shoes, etc. but the fact that I'm
sticking on one material and sliding on another indicates that the
fault is not entirely mine. I verified this by noting the length of my
slide and the ending position of my feet for the rest of my practice
session, and my theory was borne out.

Having come to this realization, it quickly became apparent to me why
my knee usually hurts after bowling at my regular house but doesn't
bother me much (if at all) after bowling on wood. Think about it: when
you stick or "plant" on the last step of your approach, either
deliberately or inadvertently, a lot of kinetic energy is being
absorbed by your knee instead of being dissipated in the slide. This
is a most unhealthy situation for your body as well as your game.

I don't want to replace my current shoes with the costlier models with
interchangeable soles. Instead, I'm going to try an old trick I've
read about for getting some slide on sticky approaches: a cut-down
tube sock slipped over the front portion of the sliding-side shoe.
Commercial "shoe sliders" are available but I'm going to try the DIY
approach first and see if this improves my game on synthetic
approaches. I like the idea of a slip-on/slip-off solution since I
won't always need the extra help (especially in the wood houses), and
I only want to carry one pair of shoes.

In conclusion, I urge everybody to get out on the approach and check
its slide-ability before throwing the first ball, and be prepared to
make adjustments.




 
Date: 11 Jun 2008 23:06:48
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Sliding, aka "Wood Is Good"
> I just wanted to follow up on my original post. I cut the front part
> off one of my old cotton socks and slipped it over my sliding shoe; I
> tried this homemade "slide sock" on the synthetic approaches last
> week. It was an especially good day for the experiment because the
> approach was even more schmutzig than usual. I'm pleased to report
> that it worked very well. A few days later I bowled at the other house
> with wood approaches and found that I even preferred the sock there as
> well.
>
> If/when the sock gets too dirty or frayed, I'll just toss it and make
> another one. Thanks to my pack-rat tendencies, I have a nearly endless
> supply of mismatched old tube socks!

Glad to read you've solved your problem, AND in a Most Inexpensive
Way. :)

Now, to put on Paul Simon's "Slip Slidin' Away"..... ; >


 
Date: 11 Jun 2008 12:33:31
From:
Subject: Re: Sliding, aka "Wood Is Good"
I just wanted to follow up on my original post. I cut the front part
off one of my old cotton socks and slipped it over my sliding shoe; I
tried this homemade "slide sock" on the synthetic approaches last
week. It was an especially good day for the experiment because the
approach was even more schmutzig than usual. I'm pleased to report
that it worked very well. A few days later I bowled at the other house
with wood approaches and found that I even preferred the sock there as
well.

If/when the sock gets too dirty or frayed, I'll just toss it and make
another one. Thanks to my pack-rat tendencies, I have a nearly endless
supply of mismatched old tube socks!


 
Date: 26 May 2008 15:12:27
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Sliding, aka "Wood Is Good"
> At 6' and 225 lbs., I suppose I qualify as a "heavier" person. As I
> mentioned above, my knee hurts like hell after a few games at the
> synthetic house. But it didn't bother me one bit after my 1 hour +
> practice session the other day at the wood house. I'm definitely
> tryin' the sock next time I find an approach that's on the sticky
> side.

I'm 6' 2" and around 340 lbs. I use Dexter SST-7's with the "super-
slick" felt sole (#10) and the "very slidy" heel (#7) which gives me a
fairly optimal slide for all approach surfaces.

> Now, is there anything I can do to my push-off side shoe to *increase*
> traction? My shoes are the "universal" type with sliding soles on both
> feet. I do not want to replace the shoes at this time. I've heard
> about hitting the soles with a wire brush (crosswise for more
> traction, lengthwise for more slide) and I do intend to try that.

The only problem with your idea is the "universal" sole material
(equivalent to the #6 "white microfiber" SST sole) is it has an
intrinsic "slide property" that can't be totally defeated. Therefore,
here are some suggestions SHORT OF purchasing a pair of
interchangeable-sole shoes (i.e., Dexter SST-5's):

1) Glue a THIN (around 1/64" thick) sheet of "non-marring" rubber
over the sole material of your non-slide shoe using flexible contact
cement. You'll definitely get "traction", but this suggestion WILL
INCREASE the thickness of the sole and may take getting used to.

2) Glue a #1 ("no-slide") SST slide sole DIRECTLY OVER the sole
material. Like idea #1, this will give you more traction at the
"expense" of a 1/32" (approx) thicker sole.

3) Assuming you have patience and are willing to do some "creative
reconstruction" on your non-slide shoe: CAREFULLY peel-off the
existing sole material (try not to damage the shoe itself) and glue a
#1 (no-slide) SST sole in its' place using a strong and flexible
contact cement (you'll have to trim it afterwards). Make sure there's
NO GLUE RESIDUE on the sole. This shouldn't increase the sole's
thickness by any appreciable amount AND you will get traction.

4) Locate a Shoe Repair Shoppe and see if the owner can replace the
existing slide material with non-marring rubber of equal thickness.

Unfortunately, these ideas incur a co$t of time and money. Factor
that into whether it's worth it over the "Way Too Easy" (and,
regretfully, more expen$ive) alternative of purchasing new shoes with
interchangeable heels and soles. You're looking @ paying around $120
(mail-order from www.bowlersparadise.com or www.buddiesproshop.com)
for, say, Dexter SST-5's and $13-$15 for a #10 "super-slide" sole.
The heel selection provided with the shoes will also be a benefit AND
they come with shoe covers.

> Lastly, I need a pair of shoe covers to protect my shoes when leaving
> the settee area. Is there any one brand or type that's superior, or
> are most equally effective? I need something that can collapse into a
> very small "package" since my bowling bag is very crowded as it is.- Hide quoted text -

All shoe covers are basically the same: just select ones that fit your
shoes, "look good" to you, and are the "right price". As for
"storing" them, just keep them on the shoes AT ALL TIMES, except when
you're bowling or out of the settee area. IOW, when you're done
bowling just put the covers on the shoes and stuff the covered shoes
in your bag.

This is the best I can offer - I certainly hope some of the other
Gurus here will add their ideas, etc. :)


 
Date: 26 May 2008 11:34:11
From:
Subject: Re: Sliding, aka "Wood Is Good"
On May 26, 1:07 am, PromptJock <102151.3...@compuserve.com > wrote:
> Excellent observations! :)
>
> Other factors that can affect one's "slide-ability" (regardless of
> surface material):
>
> 1) BODY WEIGHT. IOW, if you're a "light" person, you'll slide (and
> stop) much easier than if you're a "heavier" person.
> 2) AMBIENT TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY. If it's warm and/or humid
> (ESPECIALLY humid!), SYNTHETIC approaches will get very "tacky". Wood
> approaches seem to be relatively immune to these factors.
> 3) GENERAL "CLEANLINESS" of the approach surface. Cleaner approach
> surfaces give better "slide" than dirty ones (especially after a
> birthday party!).
> 4) "Cleanliness" of your SLIDE SOLE. IOW, if there's "gunk" on the
> sole (i.e., stepped on piece of candy), you won't slide.
> 5) DRYNESS of the slide sole. If there's even a drop of WATER on
> the sole (i.e., just went to the bathroom) you WILL stick!
>
> This is a good thread and I hope others will contribute if/as
> necessary... :)

At 6' and 225 lbs., I suppose I qualify as a "heavier" person. As I
mentioned above, my knee hurts like hell after a few games at the
synthetic house. But it didn't bother me one bit after my 1 hour +
practice session the other day at the wood house. I'm definitely
tryin' the sock next time I find an approach that's on the sticky
side.

Now, is there anything I can do to my push-off side shoe to *increase*
traction? My shoes are the "universal" type with sliding soles on both
feet. I do not want to replace the shoes at this time. I've heard
about hitting the soles with a wire brush (crosswise for more
traction, lengthwise for more slide) and I do intend to try that.

Lastly, I need a pair of shoe covers to protect my shoes when leaving
the settee area. Is there any one brand or type that's superior, or
are most equally effective? I need something that can collapse into a
very small "package" since my bowling bag is very crowded as it is.


  
Date: 27 May 2008 02:58:43
From: Darby
Subject: Re: Sliding, aka "Wood Is Good"
Put the shoe cover on your shoe after you take them off. That won't take up
any room.
Dar
<electronic_dave@hotmail.com > wrote
> On May 26, 1:07 am, PromptJock <wrote:
>> Excellent observations! :)
>>
>> Other factors that can affect one's "slide-ability" (regardless of
>> surface material):
>>
>> 1) BODY WEIGHT. IOW, if you're a "light" person, you'll slide (and
>> stop) much easier than if you're a "heavier" person.
>> 2) AMBIENT TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY. If it's warm and/or humid
>> (ESPECIALLY humid!), SYNTHETIC approaches will get very "tacky". Wood
>> approaches seem to be relatively immune to these factors.
>> 3) GENERAL "CLEANLINESS" of the approach surface. Cleaner approach
>> surfaces give better "slide" than dirty ones (especially after a
>> birthday party!).
>> 4) "Cleanliness" of your SLIDE SOLE. IOW, if there's "gunk" on the
>> sole (i.e., stepped on piece of candy), you won't slide.
>> 5) DRYNESS of the slide sole. If there's even a drop of WATER on
>> the sole (i.e., just went to the bathroom) you WILL stick!
>>
>> This is a good thread and I hope others will contribute if/as
>> necessary... :)
>
> At 6' and 225 lbs., I suppose I qualify as a "heavier" person. As I
> mentioned above, my knee hurts like hell after a few games at the
> synthetic house. But it didn't bother me one bit after my 1 hour +
> practice session the other day at the wood house. I'm definitely
> tryin' the sock next time I find an approach that's on the sticky
> side.
>
> Now, is there anything I can do to my push-off side shoe to *increase*
> traction? My shoes are the "universal" type with sliding soles on both
> feet. I do not want to replace the shoes at this time. I've heard
> about hitting the soles with a wire brush (crosswise for more
> traction, lengthwise for more slide) and I do intend to try that.
>
> Lastly, I need a pair of shoe covers to protect my shoes when leaving
> the settee area. Is there any one brand or type that's superior, or
> are most equally effective? I need something that can collapse into a
> very small "package" since my bowling bag is very crowded as it is.




 
Date: 25 May 2008 23:07:02
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Sliding, aka "Wood Is Good"
Excellent observations! :)

Other factors that can affect one's "slide-ability" (regardless of
surface material):

1) BODY WEIGHT. IOW, if you're a "light" person, you'll slide (and
stop) much easier than if you're a "heavier" person.
2) AMBIENT TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY. If it's warm and/or humid
(ESPECIALLY humid!), SYNTHETIC approaches will get very "tacky". Wood
approaches seem to be relatively immune to these factors.
3) GENERAL "CLEANLINESS" of the approach surface. Cleaner approach
surfaces give better "slide" than dirty ones (especially after a
birthday party!).
4) "Cleanliness" of your SLIDE SOLE. IOW, if there's "gunk" on the
sole (i.e., stepped on piece of candy), you won't slide.
5) DRYNESS of the slide sole. If there's even a drop of WATER on
the sole (i.e., just went to the bathroom) you WILL stick!

This is a good thread and I hope others will contribute if/as
necessary... :)



 
Date: 26 May 2008 12:46:28
From: Rob
Subject: Re: Sliding, aka "Wood Is Good"
I have used a slide sock for years. To the stage where I have a couple of
different slide socks for fast or slow approaches. I found on synthetic
approaches, the heels can drag badly - judicious and sparing use of masking
tape fixes this. Or a smear of super glue along the leading edge of the
heel - very effective, not so easy to remove as tape.

<electronic_dave@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:636a1356-38e6-4453-8686-42e3e423c4c0@m36g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
> The importance of sliding is, no doubt, common knowledge among
> advanced bowlers, but it seems a worthwhile topic to raise for the
> benefit of "developing" bowlers like myself. I'd like to relate
> something I discovered in my own game.
>
> I usually practice at a new house with synthetic lanes and approaches,
> but every now and then I'll work out at one of the older local houses
> that are equipped with wood. Generally, I bowl much better on the
> wooden lanes--and until recently, I figured it was due to how my ball
> was reacting with the lane surface, variation in oiling patterns used
> by the different houses, etc. But now I believe my problem lies on the
> nearer side of the foul line.
>
> You see, yesterday I was practicing on wooden lanes and after making a
> string of good shots, I happened to look down at my feet just after
> releasing the ball. My slide foot was in "textbook" position, just
> behind the foul line and pointing at my target. I realized that this
> almost never happens at my regular house; I usually end up short of
> the foul line with my foot (and the bowling ball!) pointing in the
> wrong direction. I used to think this was due to incompetence on my
> part, some shortcoming of my shoes, etc. but the fact that I'm
> sticking on one material and sliding on another indicates that the
> fault is not entirely mine. I verified this by noting the length of my
> slide and the ending position of my feet for the rest of my practice
> session, and my theory was borne out.
>
> Having come to this realization, it quickly became apparent to me why
> my knee usually hurts after bowling at my regular house but doesn't
> bother me much (if at all) after bowling on wood. Think about it: when
> you stick or "plant" on the last step of your approach, either
> deliberately or inadvertently, a lot of kinetic energy is being
> absorbed by your knee instead of being dissipated in the slide. This
> is a most unhealthy situation for your body as well as your game.
>
> I don't want to replace my current shoes with the costlier models with
> interchangeable soles. Instead, I'm going to try an old trick I've
> read about for getting some slide on sticky approaches: a cut-down
> tube sock slipped over the front portion of the sliding-side shoe.
> Commercial "shoe sliders" are available but I'm going to try the DIY
> approach first and see if this improves my game on synthetic
> approaches. I like the idea of a slip-on/slip-off solution since I
> won't always need the extra help (especially in the wood houses), and
> I only want to carry one pair of shoes.
>
> In conclusion, I urge everybody to get out on the approach and check
> its slide-ability before throwing the first ball, and be prepared to
> make adjustments.