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Date: 18 Feb 2005 07:20:11
From: Chuck Mularkey
Subject: Plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
hello,

Does any manufacturer make a plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
All I have noticed are ones with ye olde pancake weightblock. I've
seen plenty of guys with a lot of hand have to resort to using a
plastic ball on dry conditions, but one guy I know who has a 216+ avg
and often resorts to the plastic ball complains that it does not carry
as well. So, wouldn't a plastic ball with a stronger hi-tech core like
you would find in the high performace balls be useful in this
situation or am I just being stupid?

Chuck




 
Date: 18 Feb 2005 13:04:35
From: C D
Subject: Re: Plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
Columbia made the plastic Bast a while back, which i was told had the
regular Beast weight block inside, but it too did not go over well. I'd
suggest the Red Pearl Hammer that Hammer(Ebonite) has re-released.
Pearlized urethane is as close to plastic as you can get, and has the
weight block to help drive a little harder.
Or.. scan Ebay and get yourself a Pink Hammer... There are several of
the regulars here who would back me up on that one..:)

CD



  
Date: 18 Feb 2005 18:57:22
From: mhood
Subject: Re: Plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
C D wrote:

>Columbia made the plastic Bast a while back, which i was told had the
>regular Beast weight block inside, but it too did not go over well. I'd
>suggest the Red Pearl Hammer that Hammer(Ebonite) has re-released.
>Pearlized urethane is as close to plastic as you can get, and has the
>weight block to help drive a little harder.
>Or.. scan Ebay and get yourself a Pink Hammer... There are several of
>the regulars here who would back me up on that one..:)
>
>CD
>
>
>
Oh baby...Pink Hammers rule! Visionary makes/made a couple of
interesting balls. The Amulet Glow was Urethane with a strong core and
the Slate Gargoyle is Urethane Pearl with the standard Gargoyle core. I
still like throwing my old Pearl Blue Hammer (drilled pin on pap) on the
real toast. Any of those will hit harder than my Blue Dot.

mhood


 
Date: 18 Feb 2005 12:42:40
From: Mark
Subject: Re: Plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?

Chuck Mularkey wrote:
> hello,
>
> Does any manufacturer make a plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?

There are a few, but in general although this sounds like a good idea
it hasn't worked out very well in practice. Not to say plastic can't
score - on really burnt conditions you are much better off being in the
pocket with polyester than all over the place with resin.

Rather than jumping all the way down to plastic, consider carrying a
polished urethane ball instead. For years I carried a polished black
hammer with which I shot spares and could use on dry without giving up
as much hit as dropping down to plastic. I'm still amazed at how good
these balls are even though they are 20+ years old.

With regard to weak resins, I've not found them to be really "weak"
enough to justify the bag space. I'd rather just move further left and
find oil. If that doesn't work I figure everyone is struggling too and
I can use a different release and stay competative for the duration.

YMMV - "weak" is a very relative term :)

Mark



 
Date: 18 Feb 2005 23:19:00
From: Rob & Kirsty Buckley
Subject: Re: Plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
Chuck Mularkey wrote:
>
> hello,
>
> Does any manufacturer make a plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
> All I have noticed are ones with ye olde pancake weightblock. I've
> seen plenty of guys with a lot of hand have to resort to using a
> plastic ball on dry conditions, but one guy I know who has a 216+ avg
> and often resorts to the plastic ball complains that it does not carry
> as well. So, wouldn't a plastic ball with a stronger hi-tech core like
> you would find in the high performace balls be useful in this
> situation or am I just being stupid?
>
> Chuck

Lane 1 make a plastic with their diamond core - the XXXL.

Rob.


 
Date: 18 Feb 2005 12:45:53
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: Plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
Ebonite used to make clear plastic balls with the cores of their top of
the line reactive balls in the late 90's, but my opinion is that if a
plastic ball isn't enough to carry then it isn't dry enough for
plastic... This is when it is best to have a "very" mild pearl particle
ball (mild pearl particle with a pancake or equivalent weight block)...
The Storm Hit would be an example.

Chuck Mularkey wrote:
> hello,
>
> Does any manufacturer make a plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
> All I have noticed are ones with ye olde pancake weightblock. I've
> seen plenty of guys with a lot of hand have to resort to using a
> plastic ball on dry conditions, but one guy I know who has a 216+ avg
> and often resorts to the plastic ball complains that it does not carry
> as well. So, wouldn't a plastic ball with a stronger hi-tech core like
> you would find in the high performace balls be useful in this
> situation or am I just being stupid?
>
> Chuck


  
Date: 18 Feb 2005 13:19:59
From: Jeff Rife
Subject: Re: Plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
Tony R Smith (tonyrsmith@myrealbox.com) wrote in alt.sport.bowling:
> Ebonite used to make clear plastic balls with the cores of their top of
> the line reactive balls in the late 90's, but my opinion is that if a
> plastic ball isn't enough to carry then it isn't dry enough for
> plastic...

One problem with plastic (or polyester) is that the coefficient of
restitution isn't as high as that of the "high tech" balls. This means
that they *don't* hit the pins as hard, because they don't "push back"
as much when they hit.

A good (but expensive) solution to this would be to have a thin plastic
shell on the outside and something more "springy" just inside that.

> This is when it is best to have a "very" mild pearl particle
> ball (mild pearl particle with a pancake or equivalent weight block)...
> The Storm Hit would be an example.

I'll definitely second this (although I think all flavors of the Hit are
just reactive, not particle...there is a "Big Hit" particle, but it's not
pearlized). For really dry lanes, it still hooks quite a bit, but much
less than anything but plastic, and hits harder than plastic.

--
Jeff Rife


   
Date: 19 Feb 2005 01:40:53
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: Plastic ball with a strong hi-tech core?
I was half asleep when I wrote that... it was supposed to be a "mild
pearl reactive" not particle.

Jeff Rife wrote:

> Tony R Smith (tonyrsmith@myrealbox.com) wrote in alt.sport.bowling:
>
>>Ebonite used to make clear plastic balls with the cores of their top of
>>the line reactive balls in the late 90's, but my opinion is that if a
>>plastic ball isn't enough to carry then it isn't dry enough for
>>plastic...
>
>
> One problem with plastic (or polyester) is that the coefficient of
> restitution isn't as high as that of the "high tech" balls. This means
> that they *don't* hit the pins as hard, because they don't "push back"
> as much when they hit.
>
> A good (but expensive) solution to this would be to have a thin plastic
> shell on the outside and something more "springy" just inside that.
>
>
>> This is when it is best to have a "very" mild pearl particle
>>ball (mild pearl particle with a pancake or equivalent weight block)...
>>The Storm Hit would be an example.
>
>
> I'll definitely second this (although I think all flavors of the Hit are
> just reactive, not particle...there is a "Big Hit" particle, but it's not
> pearlized). For really dry lanes, it still hooks quite a bit, but much
> less than anything but plastic, and hits harder than plastic.
>