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Date: 04 Apr 2007 20:07:48
From: ridergroov
Subject: Newbie looking for ball purchasing advice...anyone?
Hi there folks. I am relatively new to bowling but I am really getting
into it and have decided I really need to purchase my own ball. I do
not know much about bowling balls except that there are reactive,
urethane, and plastic balls, and a little bit about the differences.
If someone wouldn't mind enlightening me beyond that and what I should
look for when I go to buy one, I would really appreciate it. Thanks.





 
Date: 11 Apr 2007 11:06:53
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Newbie looking for ball purchasing advice...anyone?
> Bought the Black Widow if anyone is interested. Thanks.

Good choice. In a "trained" hand, it's particularly "venomous"... ;)
BTW: how did you have it drilled (i.e. pin/CG placement)?

Please keep us apprised of your progress, etc.



 
Date: 11 Apr 2007 10:18:59
From: ridergroov
Subject: Re: Newbie looking for ball purchasing advice...anyone?
Bought the Black Widow if anyone is interested. Thanks.



 
Date: 09 Apr 2007 16:13:20
From: ridergroov
Subject: Re: Newbie looking for ball purchasing advice...anyone?
Wel thank you all for so much information. I think I'm going to start
out with a reactive ball at 14lbs. I have been looking into the
following. I read some reviews and tried to learn some of the terms
about the different scales and such and thought these might be good
choices. If anyone has any opinions about these, I would love to hear
it. Thanks!

Brunswick Total Inferno
Brunswick Fury
Columbia 300 Action
Elite Eclipse
Hammer Black Widow

I think I am going tomorrow so if anyone wants to write it would be
appreciated. Thanks!



 
Date: 09 Apr 2007 11:37:20
From: Kirwan Tenpin
Subject: Re: Newbie looking for ball purchasing advice...anyone?
Firstly, welcome to bowling!

Secondly, Jocks analogy with car tires is pretty close. Plastic balls get
the least grip on the lane, and will usually hook the least of the available
surfaces. Reactive resin and particle will hook the most, providing that you
release them with some side spin.

As a relatively new bowler, you should *not* be looking at expensive, high
end aggressive bowling balls. I would recommend that you look at purchasing
a fairly mellow resin ball, such as the brunswick groove, ebonite tornado,
columbia scout or similar. These balls will give you more reaction on the
lane than a plastic ball, which will encourage you to develop an effective
release. They are also mellow enough on most lane conditions to shoot spares
with consistently. It is advisable IMHO to get this ball drilled with a
fingertip grip, as it is much easier to learn with what you will be going
with long term than getting a conventional ball and changing grips later.
Talk to your local pro shop operator about this.

You absolutely need your own shoes. If you can, get a pair with only one
slide sole on the appropriate foot (left foot slide if you are a righty) as
this will help you be more consistent with your footwork. Good footwork is
the foundation to good bowling. House shoes suck far more than house balls.

Lastly, invest the $$$ you save by not buying a top end autohook ball in
some lessons from a qualified coach. On todays typical house conditions,
anyone with good fundamentals will average highly. A good coach will set you
up properly from the beginning so that you are practising good form, not
bad. Once you have developed a reasonably solid basic game, than go to a
higher end ball to suit the way you bowl and the conditions you bowl on.

Good Luck!


"ridergroov" <ridergroov1@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:1175742468.814386.324380@n59g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
> Hi there folks. I am relatively new to bowling but I am really getting
> into it and have decided I really need to purchase my own ball. I do
> not know much about bowling balls except that there are reactive,
> urethane, and plastic balls, and a little bit about the differences.
> If someone wouldn't mind enlightening me beyond that and what I should
> look for when I go to buy one, I would really appreciate it. Thanks.
>




 
Date: 06 Apr 2007 15:14:51
From: Us
Subject: Re: Newbie looking for ball purchasing advice...anyone?
Hey dude, this is 2007. Here's what you need to do:

--Go to local pro shop.

--Purchase latest, 55-piece weight block resin particle ball, designed by
NASA engineers.

--Have driller mark up ball for maximum flip; after all, if the lane was
12 inches wider, it would make a u-turn and come right back to you. The
ball markup sheet will look like an architectural drawing.

--Don't worry about shoes; after all, everyone just plants and rips these
days.

--Go to your local, walled-up 10-to-10 bowling center.

--If you're a righty, stand anywhere left of the center approach dot.

--Look anywhere on the lane outside of 10 board.

--Take whatever number of steps you like, plant your foot, and wheel the
ball to that 10 board area between the gutter and 10 board.

--Don't sweat the release or where in that 10 board area you hit; after
all, with today's balls and lane conditions, you are all but GUARANTEED to
hit the pocket.

--If you leave any pins, be sure to loudly blame the ball, the lane
condition, or the pins, but NEVER blame yourself.

If you can do all of the above, I promise that you will be a 220 average
bowler within 2 years. THAT, my friend, is the state of the game (not
sport) of bowling in 2007.

Have fun!




On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 20:07:48 -0700, ridergroov wrote:

> Hi there folks. I am relatively new to bowling but I am really getting
> into it and have decided I really need to purchase my own ball. I do
> not know much about bowling balls except that there are reactive,
> urethane, and plastic balls, and a little bit about the differences.
> If someone wouldn't mind enlightening me beyond that and what I should
> look for when I go to buy one, I would really appreciate it. Thanks.



 
Date: 04 Apr 2007 23:42:31
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Newbie looking for ball purchasing advice...anyone?
> Hi there folks. I am relatively new to bowling but I am really getting
> into it and have decided I really need to purchase my own ball. I do
> not know much about bowling balls except that there are reactive,
> urethane, and plastic balls, and a little bit about the differences.
> If someone wouldn't mind enlightening me beyond that and what I should
> look for when I go to buy one, I would really appreciate it. Thanks.

OK, here's my spiel on ball coverstock differences, using "driving the
automobile" as my analogies.

Polyester (a.k.a. "plastic"): like bald tires on wet ice - wheels just
spin, spin, spin and you just slide, slide, slide until you hit a dry
spot and then ** MAYBE ** you'll get some traction.
Urethane: like very used tires - not "bald", but still have usable
tread on them. Won't lose traction on the wet like the "baldies", but
you'll still skid a lot. Better traction on the dry pavement than the
"baldies".
Reactive: Goodyear "Aquatread" or new all-weather category. Excellent
traction, especially on the wet surfaces. Even on a "flooded" road,
you won't lose readily control (i.e. skid) unless you do "something
real stupid" behind the wheel. Dry road traction is outstanding!
Particle: studded snow tire time! not much "impedes" these babies, but
you can lose control if you encounter a quick "ice to dry"
transition. They're also very hard on the roads - the studs really
chew-up the pavement! only to be used on really slick winter roads.

As for ball recommendations: your best bet is to have the Pro
Shoperator at your Bowling Center "take a look" at your bowling form,
etc. and Go From There. IMO, since you indicate you're a "relative
newbie", you should get a PLASTIC ball (Columbia "White Dot" or
similar), drilled with a "conventional" finger grip (like the House
Balls, but fit to ** YOUR ** hand), and seriously look into getting
COACHING LESSONS from a USBC Certified "Bronze" or "Silver" coach in
your area. The sooner you can get The Basics properly taught to you
(starting stance, swing, footwork, timing, targeting, release), the
faster you can progress to handling a reactive ball with a fingertip
drilling. For the proper ball weight: 10% of your body weight, up to
16 lbs. maximum (IMHO, if "The Formula" puts you at 16 lbs., drop back
to 15 lbs. for more endurance, etc.). Of course, if you have any
PHYSICAL LIMITATIONS in your shoulder/arm/wrist/hand, a lighter ball
may be in order. Women will generally use lighter balls than men,
just because of natural physical differences in musculature and
strength from men. AGAIN, THE PRO SHOPERATOR WILL (usually) BE THE
BEST JUDGE HERE! :)

Finally: if you're REALLY SERIOUS about taking up the sport (i.e.
gonna do lots of "recreational" bowling or join a League), ** get YOUR
OWN bowling shoes! ** Good "basic" bowling shoes start @ $40-$45
(i.e. Dexter "Turbo") and will last quite a while, depending on how
often you bowl (think of the SHOE RENTAL fees you'll save AND you'll
always know "who's feet were last in the shoes"!) and how well you
take care of them (i.e. only wear them AT THE BOWLING CENTER, NEVER
wear them "outside", etc.). You'll also need your own bowling bag
(duh! ;) ) to carry the ball, shoes, towel, etc. in. FWIW, many Pro
Shops have "Ball, Bag, Shoes" deals for the Beginner Bowler like
yourself - the "whole kit" for $100 or so (includes ball fitting/
drilling). Even if your local center doesn't (at this time?), a
plastic ball (with drilling), single-ball bag, and shoes shouldn't
cost more than $130 total.

That's all I can offer - I hope it helps? :)