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Date: 27 Jun 2007 17:21:51
From: john0714
Subject: Most consecutive strkes
What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?





 
Date: 09 Jul 2007 21:39:32
From: Edward DeGraaf
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
"john0714" <john0714@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1182990111.894730.138640@g4g2000hsf.googlegroups.com...
> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
>

I had 18 strikes in a row tonight starting in the 7th frame of the 2nd game.
Needless to say, I shot my 2nd career 300 game tonight.

Edward DeGraaf,
USBC Certified Bronze Level Instructor.
President of the Internet Invitational.




 
Date: 03 Jul 2007 11:18:21
From: Mark
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
On Jul 1, 9:32 pm, "Robert A. Zanol" <presence1...@verizon.net > wrote:
> Back in the day the ABC had a requirement that every board have at least 3
> units of oil applied. I am sure there were other measurements which were
> taken into consideration such as length of oil, were the lanes buffed etc. I
> am not up to date with the current USBC standards but it is all laid out
> precisely in the book.

Funny as "back in the day" in this case is not back but current. The
rule as per the system of bowling (introduced ~1991) is that for the
distance which conditioner is applied there must be at least three
units per board. This essentially allows a legal block (wall, house
china, THS) because three units is nothing to a modern ball. SoB in
many ways has lead to rampant easy scoring in today's game. It's not
uncommon to see lanes dressed with 3-6 units outside of 10 board and
then a steep increase into the 50s or more in the middle (oil applied
10-10 symetrically). This is what allows you to throw right (or left)
and have unlimited free hook outside and hold in the middle.

Prior to the system of bowling, the ABC experimented with various
rules, short oil, long oil, etc. New conditioners, strippers and lane
machines have had a dramatic impact on a centers ability to put out a
very consistent shot. With this technology centers can create very
easy or very difficult conditions and be within USBC legal parameters.

Sport Bowling rules are trying to combat the "walling up" or
"blocking" of lanes by introducing ratio rules. Say a pattern was
applied from 1 board to 40 board with the same amount (units) of
conditioner all the way across the lane That would be a flat, or 1:1
pattern. You can bowl on this type of patter each year at the BTM
tournament. To be "sport" compliant the pattern must have a 3:1 or
less ratio (IIRC) board to board. So with sport rules you can't wall a
lane easily because jumping from 3 units up to 50-100 units is not
allowed. You can put out a "Crowned shot) which provides some room for
error but that room is drastically reduced from the block type shot
described above.

Here are some links with some history and explanations of various
terms:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/kennmelvin/tOil.htm

http://www.bsu.edu/web/rcain/lane_tech.htm

Kegel Company and The Foundation (www.kegel.net) have many articals
and comments on oil patterns and history. John Davis has probably done
more than any other individual in the to understand and refine the
modern approaches to lane conditioning. He also champions a return to
"fair" conditions that control scoring potential.

Finally, the magazine Bowling This Month (BTM) has run many articals
over the years on lane conditioning and how to play them.

>Whenever a high game or high series is bowled they
> may come out to inspect the lanes on which it was bowled.

Usually not anymore. If the center is USBC certified during the once
yearly inspection then honor scores are accepted.

For Paul A - it is very difficult today for the USBC to turn down an
honor score. With the system of bowling type rules and the way centers
are certified almost any reasonable claim will be given the award. The
USBC is also worried about being sued if they decline an award (see
many articles on the web regarding certain 900 awards). Take home is
that today bowling on a THS is so easy that honor scores don't mean
much to serious players so there is limited interest in policing them.
Shooting 300/800 in a PBA event, at Nationals or on a sport condition
will earn you respect but on a THS folks ahrdly even notice honor
scores anymore. Sad perhaps but the game has changed.

BTW, folks often complain that Glenn's 900 was not recognized. There
is a good argument to be made that he is more famous because the
series was rejected than if it had been awarded.

Hope that was somewhat interesting - felt like typing :-)

Mark



  
Date: 04 Jul 2007 06:10:52
From: Robert A. Zanol
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
Mark,

Thanks, like I said there is someone here who is more knowledgeable in this
area than myself. I didn't even realize the 3 unit rule was still in effect.

I can chalk this up to the fact that I used to be pretty good at bowling
until I had surgery to put 6 screws and a plate on my right tibia plateau
just under the knee. I couldn't even bowl for close to three years. I have
been back for four years now, but my outlook is totally different. Due to my
physical limitations I am no longer a "serious" bowler. I still am very
compettitive and want to excel, but at the same time I realize I will never
be physically able to perform at my past level. I still love bowling and
competition, but I have the attitude that if I bowl bad today and that is
the worst thing that happens to me today I am fortunate indeed. I am just
glad I can walk, work and take care of my soon to be 5 year old daughter
whom I have had custody of since she was 30 days old. Now that is really
what is important to me in life. As much as I love bowling, it pales in
comparison to this stuff. So I haven't really been up to par on keeping
informed about this kind of stuff and all the technological advances in the
game today. So thanks for the info...RAZ


"Mark" <twobowlers@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1183486701.025544.315510@k29g2000hsd.googlegroups.com...
> On Jul 1, 9:32 pm, "Robert A. Zanol" <presence1...@verizon.net> wrote:
>> Back in the day the ABC had a requirement that every board have at least
>> 3
>> units of oil applied. I am sure there were other measurements which were
>> taken into consideration such as length of oil, were the lanes buffed
>> etc. I
>> am not up to date with the current USBC standards but it is all laid out
>> precisely in the book.
>
> Funny as "back in the day" in this case is not back but current. The
> rule as per the system of bowling (introduced ~1991) is that for the
> distance which conditioner is applied there must be at least three
> units per board. This essentially allows a legal block (wall, house
> china, THS) because three units is nothing to a modern ball. SoB in
> many ways has lead to rampant easy scoring in today's game. It's not
> uncommon to see lanes dressed with 3-6 units outside of 10 board and
> then a steep increase into the 50s or more in the middle (oil applied
> 10-10 symetrically). This is what allows you to throw right (or left)
> and have unlimited free hook outside and hold in the middle.
>
> Prior to the system of bowling, the ABC experimented with various
> rules, short oil, long oil, etc. New conditioners, strippers and lane
> machines have had a dramatic impact on a centers ability to put out a
> very consistent shot. With this technology centers can create very
> easy or very difficult conditions and be within USBC legal parameters.
>
> Sport Bowling rules are trying to combat the "walling up" or
> "blocking" of lanes by introducing ratio rules. Say a pattern was
> applied from 1 board to 40 board with the same amount (units) of
> conditioner all the way across the lane That would be a flat, or 1:1
> pattern. You can bowl on this type of patter each year at the BTM
> tournament. To be "sport" compliant the pattern must have a 3:1 or
> less ratio (IIRC) board to board. So with sport rules you can't wall a
> lane easily because jumping from 3 units up to 50-100 units is not
> allowed. You can put out a "Crowned shot) which provides some room for
> error but that room is drastically reduced from the block type shot
> described above.
>
> Here are some links with some history and explanations of various
> terms:
>
> http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/kennmelvin/tOil.htm
>
> http://www.bsu.edu/web/rcain/lane_tech.htm
>
> Kegel Company and The Foundation (www.kegel.net) have many articals
> and comments on oil patterns and history. John Davis has probably done
> more than any other individual in the to understand and refine the
> modern approaches to lane conditioning. He also champions a return to
> "fair" conditions that control scoring potential.
>
> Finally, the magazine Bowling This Month (BTM) has run many articals
> over the years on lane conditioning and how to play them.
>
>>Whenever a high game or high series is bowled they
>> may come out to inspect the lanes on which it was bowled.
>
> Usually not anymore. If the center is USBC certified during the once
> yearly inspection then honor scores are accepted.
>
> For Paul A - it is very difficult today for the USBC to turn down an
> honor score. With the system of bowling type rules and the way centers
> are certified almost any reasonable claim will be given the award. The
> USBC is also worried about being sued if they decline an award (see
> many articles on the web regarding certain 900 awards). Take home is
> that today bowling on a THS is so easy that honor scores don't mean
> much to serious players so there is limited interest in policing them.
> Shooting 300/800 in a PBA event, at Nationals or on a sport condition
> will earn you respect but on a THS folks ahrdly even notice honor
> scores anymore. Sad perhaps but the game has changed.
>
> BTW, folks often complain that Glenn's 900 was not recognized. There
> is a good argument to be made that he is more famous because the
> series was rejected than if it had been awarded.
>
> Hope that was somewhat interesting - felt like typing :-)
>
> Mark
>




 
Date: 30 Jun 2007 01:43:07
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
> No, wait...I "went" on strike...I guess that is different.

Pickety, pickety, pickety... ; >



 
Date: 29 Jun 2007 18:40:26
From: Mark
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
On Jun 28, 10:30 am, litefrozen <litefro...@mothership.com > wrote:
> # Also sharing the 36 in-a-row record is professional bowler Norm Duke.
> During an April 1996 PBA tournament held in North Brunswick, N.J. Duke
> had three consecutive perfect games. His effort was over the course of
> two squads and not in a single series.

Duke might have the record in tournament play for most in a row. The
game in front (or behind - don't remember) the 300, 300, 300 was a
278. So odds are good that he had more than 36 in a row.

The Firestorm he used is on display at the Storm factory. Kinda neat.
I think that was the same year Dennis Horan won the first national
title with Storm equipment also using a Firestorm.

My record is 19. Probably why I don't bowl for a living :-)

Mark




  
Date: 03 Jul 2007 22:39:40
From: reynolds9835
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
After bowling my first 300 game a few years back (in a tournament), I
continued the next game with the first seven. I was freaking a bit at this
point - first 300 and all - and was actually glad to stop striking.

"Mark" <twobowlers@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1183167626.904578.136510@n60g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
> On Jun 28, 10:30 am, litefrozen <litefro...@mothership.com> wrote:
>> # Also sharing the 36 in-a-row record is professional bowler Norm Duke.
>> During an April 1996 PBA tournament held in North Brunswick, N.J. Duke
>> had three consecutive perfect games. His effort was over the course of
>> two squads and not in a single series.
>
> Duke might have the record in tournament play for most in a row. The
> game in front (or behind - don't remember) the 300, 300, 300 was a
> 278. So odds are good that he had more than 36 in a row.
>
> The Firestorm he used is on display at the Storm factory. Kinda neat.
> I think that was the same year Dennis Horan won the first national
> title with Storm equipment also using a Firestorm.
>
> My record is 19. Probably why I don't bowl for a living :-)
>
> Mark
>
>




 
Date: 28 Jun 2007 13:21:41
From: 6ballman
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
I had a triple in the sport league last night

john0714 wrote:
> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
>
>

--
"Political language -- and with variations this is true of all
political parties, from Conservatives to Anarchists -- is
designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable,
and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind."
-George Orwell


 
Date: 28 Jun 2007 12:41:13
From: litefrozen
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
In article <1182990111.894730.138640@g4g2000hsf.googlegroups.com >, john0714 <john0714@aol.com> wrote:

> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
>
Strikes, most consecutive, individual
Men
36 Jeremy Sonnenfeld, Lincoln, Neb., Feb. 2, 1997 was the first. (Nine others have since achieved this feat.)

Women
40 Jeanne Naccarato, Tacoma, Wash., . 23, 1986*
33 Jeanne Naccarato, Tacoma, Wash., 1986-87
32 Jada Mocaby, Hobart, Ind., Jan. 27, 2004
31 Patty Ann, Arlington Heights, Ill., 1984-85
30 Anne Marie Duggan, Edmond, Okla., July 18, 1993
*Naccarato rolled 40 consecutive strikes during the Womenıs Central State Tournament. She finished the doubles event with seven strikes, before bowling games of 300-300-264 in the singles event.

Strikes, most consecutive, team Ŭ
Men
33 Porter Pro Shop, Flint, Mich., Oct. 8, 1999
32 Milwaukie Bowl, Beaverton, Ore., 1988-89
28 Pro Fit, Detroit, 1988-89
Fireside Lanes, Sacramento, Calif., Oct. 1, 1992
27 The Bar I, Green Bay, Wis., Dec 17, 2002


  
Date: 28 Jun 2007 07:27:20
From: ross smith
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
litefrozen wrote:
> In article <1182990111.894730.138640@g4g2000hsf.googlegroups.com>, john0714 <john0714@aol.com> wrote:
>
>> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
>> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
>>
> Strikes, most consecutive, individual
> Men
> 36 Jeremy Sonnenfeld, Lincoln, Neb., Feb. 2, 1997 was the first. (Nine others have since achieved this feat.)
>
> Women
> 40 Jeanne Naccarato, Tacoma, Wash., . 23, 1986*
> 33 Jeanne Naccarato, Tacoma, Wash., 1986-87
> 32 Jada Mocaby, Hobart, Ind., Jan. 27, 2004
> 31 Patty Ann, Arlington Heights, Ill., 1984-85
> 30 Anne Marie Duggan, Edmond, Okla., July 18, 1993
> *Naccarato rolled 40 consecutive strikes during the Womenıs Central State Tournament. She finished the doubles event with seven strikes, before bowling games of 300-300-264 in the singles event.
>
> Strikes, most consecutive, team Ŭ
> Men
> 33 Porter Pro Shop, Flint, Mich., Oct. 8, 1999
> 32 Milwaukie Bowl, Beaverton, Ore., 1988-89
> 28 Pro Fit, Detroit, 1988-89
> Fireside Lanes, Sacramento, Calif., Oct. 1, 1992
> 27 The Bar I, Green Bay, Wis., Dec 17, 2002
#1 is glenn allison july 1 1982 300-300-300


   
Date: 28 Jun 2007 14:18:51
From: litefrozen
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
In article <U7CdnWU95eayKh7bnZ2dnUVZ_o_inZ2d@comcast.com >, ross smith <rosssmith3@comcast.net> wrote:

> #1 is glenn allison july 1 1982 300-300-300
The posters asked about official most strikes
While Glenn did bowl 900 it wasnt officially recognized do to the lane conditions.
But he did shoot 36 in a row.
I believe there also are some that are before him who had as many or more consecutive strikes.
But not in a three game series.

--------------------------
Glenn Allison's 900 series

6/27/2006


The following American Bowling Congress account of the events
surrounding Glenn Allison's 900 series originally appeared in the
January 1983 issue of Bowling Digest magazine:

Glenn Allison won four ABC titles and six PBA titles and was elected to
the ABC Hall of Fame and the PBA Hall of Fame.

In 1979, Allison was photographed with a poster of him with his
teammates on the Falstaff Brewing Corporation bowling team of St. Louis.
Front: captain Steve Nagy; second row: Glenn Allison, Dick Hoover; back
row: Harry Smith, Billy Welu and Al Savas.

Allison joins the ABC Tournament's elite 50-year club during the 2001
event. At the time, Allison set his sights on another goal: the 100,000
pin club. He estimated it would take him another five years to knock
down his 100,000th pin in the Tournament. He was right on the mark. On
March 19, 2006, Allison became the ninth bowler in the tournament's
103-year history to eclipse 100,000 pins.
How ABC decided not to approve because of non-complying lane conditions

As every interested bowler knows, the American Bowling Congress did not
approve Glenn Allison's three 300 games and 900 series award application
because of non-complying conditions on the lanes on which the scores
were bowled.

But no one at ABC ever said Allison didn't bowl 900 on Ju1y 1, 1982 at
La Habra 300 Bowl in La Habra, Calif., and no one at ABC ever said that
36 straight strikes wasn't an amazing feat considering the factors that
affect an apparently perfect shot. A stubborn 10-pin often does stand up
on a seemingly perfect hit.

With those acknowledgements, however, the fact remains that under ABC
Article 7, Section 3 of the Rule Book, the lanes were not dressed in
accordance with rules established by the delegates who attend the annual
ABC Convention.

And that's the only factor that ABC's administrative leaders could
assess. The facts that Glenn Allison is a member of the ABC Hall of
Fame, a topnotch bowler and fine gentlemen are not an issue.

Here's what happened:
Following Allison's performance, a team of local association lane
inspectors headed up by association secretary Bob Ramirez responded to a
call to inspect the lanes. The three men made the inspection and filled
out the form. (One discrepancy occurred. While the box for
non-compliance was properly checked, the word "non" was left off the
written report. Thus the sentence read that there was a "complying"
condition. Later, the three inspectors signed affidavits pointing out
that they had meant to write "non-complying.")

The next morning ABC director Ken Knapp of Los Angeles was called in to
inspect the lanes, which management advised were not touched since
Allison completed bowling. Knapp made his inspection, then filled out
his report.

ABC administrative assistant Burt Kellermann of Milwaukee was advised of
the score on July 2 and flew to Los Angeles. Kellermann made the third
inspection, filled out his report and, as the other ABC officials had,
met with the establishment's management.

Later, after an award application was filed, ABC administrative leaders
in suburban Milwaukee reviewed the reports and recommendations, then
sent a letter to the center's management and Allison advising them they
had 15 days to submit any information which might explain what was shown
on the lane reports.

By letter dated July 25, La Habra 300 Bowl management asked for a
four-week extension to prepare material and ABC executive
secretary-treasurer Ken Hurley granted that request.

After receiving information and evaluating the entire file, ABC
executive secretary-treasurer Roger Tessman, who succeeded Hurley Aug.
1, determined Sept. 1 that award recognition of Allison's scores could
not be approved administratively due to non-complying conditions on the
lanes on which the scores were bowled. That determination followed
extensive study of the lane dressing inspection reports as well as
material submitted by the management of the establishment.

Allison and the center's management were notified and Allison was
advised of his right to appeal to the ABC High Score and Awards Review
committee.

On October 30, Allison appeared before the committee, which is made up
of members of the ABC Board of Directors, men who are not administrative
personnel.

Allison was given unlimited time to discuss any point of the case and he
was questioned by the committee members. One of the members,
incidentally, was Ken Knapp, who excused himself from any part of that
hearing other than to be seated in the room. Knapp was not involved in
the committee's discussion or decision.

Following Allison's personal appearance, the committee considered his
appeal in executive session, then made the determination that the scores
could not be approved because of non-complying conditions.

Under the ABC Rules, the decision of the High Score and Awards Review
committee is final.

Allison has carried his appeal through all ABC procedures and the matter
was accordingly closed.


    
Date: 28 Jun 2007 14:30:28
From: litefrozen
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
The American Bowling Congress (ABC) has had at least six other reports
of 900 series being bowled in its 100+ year history. None were approved
either because the league or tournament had not agreed to be governed by
the ABC prior to the event or because the lane conditions did not
satisfy ABC standards.

Those known to have unsanctioned 900s were:
Leo Bentley Lorain, Ohio March 26, 1931
Joe Sargent Rochester, N.Y. 1934
Jim Murgie Philadelphia, Pa. Feb. 4, 1937
Bob Brown Roseville, Calif. April 12, 1980
Glenn Allison LaHabra, Calif. July 1, 1982
John Strausbaugh York, Pa. July 11, 1987

Scores for three consecutive perfect games have been approved on two
other occasions:
# During a December 1993 tournament, Troy Ockerman, Owosso, Mich.,
blasted four 300 games - all on the same day. Three of those games,
covering two different events, were consecutive. His string of at least
36 in-a-row ties him for the men's record for the most consecutive
strikes.
# Also sharing the 36 in-a-row record is professional bowler Norm Duke.
During an April 1996 PBA tournament held in North Brunswick, N.J. Duke
had three consecutive perfect games. His effort was over the course of
two squads and not in a single series.


     
Date: 08 Jul 2007 19:56:33
From: Al Dow
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
The PBA record is 33 in a row but it's been so long i forget who it was. It
wasn't me.


"litefrozen" <litefrozen@mothership.com > wrote in message
news:280620071033331701%litefrozen@mothership.com...
> The American Bowling Congress (ABC) has had at least six other reports
> of 900 series being bowled in its 100+ year history. None were approved
> either because the league or tournament had not agreed to be governed by
> the ABC prior to the event or because the lane conditions did not
> satisfy ABC standards.
>
> Those known to have unsanctioned 900s were:
> Leo Bentley Lorain, Ohio March 26, 1931
> Joe Sargent Rochester, N.Y. 1934
> Jim Murgie Philadelphia, Pa. Feb. 4, 1937
> Bob Brown Roseville, Calif. April 12, 1980
> Glenn Allison LaHabra, Calif. July 1, 1982
> John Strausbaugh York, Pa. July 11, 1987
>
> Scores for three consecutive perfect games have been approved on two
> other occasions:
> # During a December 1993 tournament, Troy Ockerman, Owosso, Mich.,
> blasted four 300 games - all on the same day. Three of those games,
> covering two different events, were consecutive. His string of at least
> 36 in-a-row ties him for the men's record for the most consecutive
> strikes.
> # Also sharing the 36 in-a-row record is professional bowler Norm Duke.
> During an April 1996 PBA tournament held in North Brunswick, N.J. Duke
> had three consecutive perfect games. His effort was over the course of
> two squads and not in a single series.




     
Date: 28 Jun 2007 11:14:06
From: Paul Anderson
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
In article <280620071033331701%litefrozen@mothership.com >,
litefrozen <litefrozen@mothership.com > wrote:

> The American Bowling Congress (ABC) has had at least six other
> reports of 900 series being bowled in its 100+ year history. None
> were approved either because the league or tournament had not agreed
> to be governed by the ABC prior to the event or because the lane
> conditions did not satisfy ABC standards.

Can someone describe what lane conditions would not satisfy ABC
standards or be otherwise non-compliant?

Paul

--
Paul Anderson
OpenVMS Engineering
Hewlett-Packard Company


      
Date: 02 Jul 2007 01:32:14
From: Robert A. Zanol
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
Back in the day the ABC had a requirement that every board have at least 3
units of oil applied. I am sure there were other measurements which were
taken into consideration such as length of oil, were the lanes buffed etc. I
am not up to date with the current USBC standards but it is all laid out
precisely in the book. Whenever a high game or high series is bowled they
may come out to inspect the lanes on which it was bowled.

Each center also has the USBC come in at least once a year to inspect the
lanes for compliance and to get certified. It actually is a very detailed
and exact science.

I am sure there are other people on this newsgroup who know much more than
myself about this topic.

RAZ
--------------------------------------------------------------
"Paul Anderson" <paul.anderson@hp.com > wrote in message
news:paul.anderson-E6845F.11140628062007@usenet01.boi.hp.com...
> In article <280620071033331701%litefrozen@mothership.com>,
> litefrozen <litefrozen@mothership.com> wrote:
>
>> The American Bowling Congress (ABC) has had at least six other
>> reports of 900 series being bowled in its 100+ year history. None
>> were approved either because the league or tournament had not agreed
>> to be governed by the ABC prior to the event or because the lane
>> conditions did not satisfy ABC standards.
>
> Can someone describe what lane conditions would not satisfy ABC
> standards or be otherwise non-compliant?
>
> Paul
>
> --
> Paul Anderson
> OpenVMS Engineering
> Hewlett-Packard Company




      
Date: 29 Jun 2007 01:04:14
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
Rather than go into a full description, I will let you read it for
yourself. Page 87 of the USBC Playing Rules talks about Certification
Retention. It describes how a lane is allowed to be dressed and when it
must be "taped".

http://www.bowl.com/rules/playingrules.aspx

Page 16 of the USBC Equipment Specs Manual describes the specification
of the lane oil itself. It also has all of the specifcations for a
certified bowling center. You can download it, all or in part, by
clicking on the appropriate link in the right column at the following link.

http://www.bowl.com/specs/main.aspx

Paul Anderson wrote:
> In article <280620071033331701%litefrozen@mothership.com>,
> litefrozen <litefrozen@mothership.com> wrote:
>
>> The American Bowling Congress (ABC) has had at least six other
>> reports of 900 series being bowled in its 100+ year history. None
>> were approved either because the league or tournament had not agreed
>> to be governed by the ABC prior to the event or because the lane
>> conditions did not satisfy ABC standards.
>
> Can someone describe what lane conditions would not satisfy ABC
> standards or be otherwise non-compliant?
>
> Paul
>


 
Date: 28 Jun 2007 00:10:36
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?

I think I've made it to 7 in Sanctioned League Competition. Ended
with, as I recall, a 269 for that game?

Feel free to ask "What stopped the string?" The answer was this: MY
BRAIN! :)



  
Date: 28 Jun 2007 17:53:38
From: Darby
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
I have the 11 in a row plaque, no 300 ring. But to answer the original
question. I don't know if they have awards for 1200 game, a perfect 4 game
series, but there are sanctioned 900's which would be 36 strikes in a row.
You'd have to ask those guys if the string started before or continued after
those strikes.
Dar

"PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com > wrote
>> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
>> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
>
> I think I've made it to 7 in Sanctioned League Competition. Ended
> with, as I recall, a 269 for that game?
>
> Feel free to ask "What stopped the string?" The answer was this: MY
> BRAIN! :)
>




   
Date: 29 Jun 2007 12:17:14
From: Paul Horvick
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
I had a strike once.

No, wait...I "went" on strike...I guess that is different.

Paul Horvick

"Darby" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com > wrote in message
news:CASgi.185255$_c5.126977@attbi_s22...
>I have the 11 in a row plaque, no 300 ring. But to answer the original
>question. I don't know if they have awards for 1200 game, a perfect 4 game
>series, but there are sanctioned 900's which would be 36 strikes in a row.
>You'd have to ask those guys if the string started before or continued
>after those strikes.
> Dar
>
> "PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com> wrote
>>> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
>>> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
>>
>> I think I've made it to 7 in Sanctioned League Competition. Ended
>> with, as I recall, a 269 for that game?
>>
>> Feel free to ask "What stopped the string?" The answer was this: MY
>> BRAIN! :)
>>
>
>




    
Date: 09 Jul 2007 17:55:59
From: Jim Doran
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
Dang it, Paul...haven't seen your name on here in ages.
How are you? Still up in the frozen tundra?

Jim D.
Enjoy! Friendship is the best part of bowling.
"Paul Horvick" <phorvick@loretel.net > wrote in message
news:f63eqf0309l@enews2.newsguy.com...
> I had a strike once.
>
> No, wait...I "went" on strike...I guess that is different.
>
> Paul Horvick
>
> "Darby" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com> wrote in message
> news:CASgi.185255$_c5.126977@attbi_s22...
> >I have the 11 in a row plaque, no 300 ring. But to answer the original
> >question. I don't know if they have awards for 1200 game, a perfect 4
game
> >series, but there are sanctioned 900's which would be 36 strikes in a
row.
> >You'd have to ask those guys if the string started before or continued
> >after those strikes.
> > Dar
> >
> > "PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com> wrote
> >>> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
> >>> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
> >>
> >> I think I've made it to 7 in Sanctioned League Competition. Ended
> >> with, as I recall, a 269 for that game?
> >>
> >> Feel free to ask "What stopped the string?" The answer was this: MY
> >> BRAIN! :)
> >>
> >
> >
>
>




     
Date: 10 Jul 2007 02:09:38
From: Darby
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
Hey Paul and Jim, welcome back. I saw Al had a post too. Maybe some of you
guys come back we'll get some life in this group!!!
Dar

"Jim Doran" <j-k-doran(spamremover)@tx.rr.com > wrote
...
> Dang it, Paul...haven't seen your name on here in ages.
> How are you? Still up in the frozen tundra?
>
> Jim D.
> Enjoy! Friendship is the best part of bowling.
> "Paul Horvick" <phorvick@loretel.net> wrote \
>> I had a strike once.
>>
>> No, wait...I "went" on strike...I guess that is different.
>>
>> Paul Horvick
>>
>> "Darby" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com> wrote in message
>> news:CASgi.185255$_c5.126977@attbi_s22...
>> >I have the 11 in a row plaque, no 300 ring. But to answer the original
>> >question. I don't know if they have awards for 1200 game, a perfect 4
> game
>> >series, but there are sanctioned 900's which would be 36 strikes in a
> row.
>> >You'd have to ask those guys if the string started before or continued
>> >after those strikes.
>> > Dar
>> >
>> > "PromptJock" <102151.3223@compuserve.com> wrote
>> >>> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
>> >>> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
>> >>
>> >> I think I've made it to 7 in Sanctioned League Competition. Ended
>> >> with, as I recall, a 269 for that game?
>> >>
>> >> Feel free to ask "What stopped the string?" The answer was this: MY
>> >> BRAIN! :)
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>




  
Date: 28 Jun 2007 09:07:52
From: newsreader
Subject: Re: Most consecutive strkes
PromptJock wrote:
>> What is the most consecutive stikes anyone has ever officially bowled
>> in pro tournament play or anything else you feel is legit?
>
> I think I've made it to 7 in Sanctioned League Competition. Ended
> with, as I recall, a 269 for that game?
>
> Feel free to ask "What stopped the string?" The answer was this: MY
> BRAIN! :)
>
Well said. People naturally start thinking about the score and 'getting
a strike next ball'. This takes there mind off the place (and time)
where the bowling actually happens - on the approach.
Secret of a big score - one ball at a time !

Never forget the pins fall over a couple of seconds AFTER you have
bowled - stay in your own time-zone. Easier said than done...