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Date: 30 Dec 2004 00:42:55
From: twobirds
Subject: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
I suppose I need a little advice, and I should give a bit of background...

I'm a casual bowler with a low average. I throw a straight ball (standard
old K-Mart plastic brunswick ball, BTW). - I was asked by a pal to be a
fill in occasionally on his league team that has a couple of members in the
Guard and off to Iraq for awhile.

Sooo.. I decided to learn how to throw a hook and I talked to a few good
bowlers and did some reading looking for a ball that would help me learn to
throw a hook... It all came to a consensus that a ball that would skid and
then flip would best suit my strength, size, delivery etc; and would mean
the smallest adjustment in how I already bowl.

The pro-shop guy sold me a Columbia 300 Jekyll. My team-mates etc agreed
that it was a reasonable choice for me. Well, it came in today, and the
pro-shop guy drilled it fingertip for me. - I threw three games with it
today and really didn't have much difficulty adjusting my release to get
some revs.. (though I had some trouble trusting the hook and I tended to try
pull my release back to the center).... But, anyway:

Here is the kicker. Upon inspection of my new ball tonight, I noticed it
appears to have been plugged. I think the pro-shop man made a mistake when
he started drilling and then had to plug it and then re-drill. Maybe I just
don't know what I'm talking about, but http://tinyurl.com/5gcp7 is a picture
of the ball, the drilling, and what I beleive must be a plug. Please
correct me if I am wrong. Perhaps that orange round dot to the upper right
of the Columbia logo is supposed to be there by design?

So, here is my dillema: Assuming the pro-shop guy screwed up and had to
plug my new ball, should I be upset about it? I doubt it will have any
effect on my game (I'm really not very good), but I paid retail price for
the ball and the drilling (to the tune of $140.00 USD plus I bought a new
towell and bag while I was there today for another $65.00 USD). I don't
know enough about this to have any idea if this is a common thing that
shouldn't bug me... or if I should go with my "consumer instinct" and expect
that a new ball should be drilled properly the first time and that I should
have received an immaculate ball.

Help?






 
Date: 06 Jan 2005 22:05:50
From: Justin Pass
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
That orange dot is called the bowling ball's pin. Every bowling ball has
one. That is not a plug!


"twobirds" <notareal@eaddy.com > wrote in message
news:d6CdnVll15pjLU7cRVn-hg@bresnan.com...
>I suppose I need a little advice, and I should give a bit of background...
>
> I'm a casual bowler with a low average. I throw a straight ball (standard
> old K-Mart plastic brunswick ball, BTW). - I was asked by a pal to be a
> fill in occasionally on his league team that has a couple of members in
> the
> Guard and off to Iraq for awhile.
>
> Sooo.. I decided to learn how to throw a hook and I talked to a few good
> bowlers and did some reading looking for a ball that would help me learn
> to
> throw a hook... It all came to a consensus that a ball that would skid
> and
> then flip would best suit my strength, size, delivery etc; and would mean
> the smallest adjustment in how I already bowl.
>
> The pro-shop guy sold me a Columbia 300 Jekyll. My team-mates etc agreed
> that it was a reasonable choice for me. Well, it came in today, and the
> pro-shop guy drilled it fingertip for me. - I threw three games with it
> today and really didn't have much difficulty adjusting my release to get
> some revs.. (though I had some trouble trusting the hook and I tended to
> try
> pull my release back to the center).... But, anyway:
>
> Here is the kicker. Upon inspection of my new ball tonight, I noticed it
> appears to have been plugged. I think the pro-shop man made a mistake when
> he started drilling and then had to plug it and then re-drill. Maybe I
> just
> don't know what I'm talking about, but http://tinyurl.com/5gcp7 is a
> picture
> of the ball, the drilling, and what I beleive must be a plug. Please
> correct me if I am wrong. Perhaps that orange round dot to the upper
> right
> of the Columbia logo is supposed to be there by design?
>
> So, here is my dillema: Assuming the pro-shop guy screwed up and had to
> plug my new ball, should I be upset about it? I doubt it will have any
> effect on my game (I'm really not very good), but I paid retail price for
> the ball and the drilling (to the tune of $140.00 USD plus I bought a new
> towell and bag while I was there today for another $65.00 USD). I don't
> know enough about this to have any idea if this is a common thing that
> shouldn't bug me... or if I should go with my "consumer instinct" and
> expect
> that a new ball should be drilled properly the first time and that I
> should
> have received an immaculate ball.
>
> Help?
>
>





 
Date:
From:
Subject:


 
Date: 30 Dec 2004 12:48:47
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
A little more insight into what the "pin" is... In the process of making
a bowling ball, the weight block is molded around a plastic dowel rod
(think of it as a Popsicle stick). The weight block is then suspended in
a mold for the inner core and the inner core material is poured around
the weight block. The resulting core is then suspended in a mold for the
coverstock. When the process is complete, the rod is shaved off level
with the ball and the coverstock is surfaced. The resulting "pin" is
used to locate the position of the top of the weight block for drilling
purposes. On some balls (mostly plastic balls) the rod (pin) is made
from the same material as the coverstock so it is very hard to see, but
"all" bowling balls have pins... look a little harder at your "K-mart
special" and you will find one.

twobirds wrote:
> I suppose I need a little advice, and I should give a bit of background...
>
> I'm a casual bowler with a low average. I throw a straight ball (standard
> old K-Mart plastic brunswick ball, BTW). - I was asked by a pal to be a
> fill in occasionally on his league team that has a couple of members in the
> Guard and off to Iraq for awhile.
>
> Sooo.. I decided to learn how to throw a hook and I talked to a few good
> bowlers and did some reading looking for a ball that would help me learn to
> throw a hook... It all came to a consensus that a ball that would skid and
> then flip would best suit my strength, size, delivery etc; and would mean
> the smallest adjustment in how I already bowl.
>
> The pro-shop guy sold me a Columbia 300 Jekyll. My team-mates etc agreed
> that it was a reasonable choice for me. Well, it came in today, and the
> pro-shop guy drilled it fingertip for me. - I threw three games with it
> today and really didn't have much difficulty adjusting my release to get
> some revs.. (though I had some trouble trusting the hook and I tended to try
> pull my release back to the center).... But, anyway:
>
> Here is the kicker. Upon inspection of my new ball tonight, I noticed it
> appears to have been plugged. I think the pro-shop man made a mistake when
> he started drilling and then had to plug it and then re-drill. Maybe I just
> don't know what I'm talking about, but http://tinyurl.com/5gcp7 is a picture
> of the ball, the drilling, and what I beleive must be a plug. Please
> correct me if I am wrong. Perhaps that orange round dot to the upper right
> of the Columbia logo is supposed to be there by design?
>
> So, here is my dillema: Assuming the pro-shop guy screwed up and had to
> plug my new ball, should I be upset about it? I doubt it will have any
> effect on my game (I'm really not very good), but I paid retail price for
> the ball and the drilling (to the tune of $140.00 USD plus I bought a new
> towell and bag while I was there today for another $65.00 USD). I don't
> know enough about this to have any idea if this is a common thing that
> shouldn't bug me... or if I should go with my "consumer instinct" and expect
> that a new ball should be drilled properly the first time and that I should
> have received an immaculate ball.
>
> Help?
>
>


  
Date: 31 Dec 2004 09:03:14
From: Mudd Bug
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...

"Tony R Smith" <tonyrsmith@myrealbox.com > wrote in message
news:POSAd.42633$Ew6.36670@twister.socal.rr.com...
>A little more insight into what the "pin" is... In the process of making a
>bowling ball, the weight block is molded around a plastic dowel rod (think
>of it as a Popsicle stick). The weight block is then suspended in a mold
>for the inner core and the inner core material is poured around the weight
>block. The resulting core is then suspended in a mold for the coverstock.
>When the process is complete, the rod is shaved off level with the ball and
>the coverstock is surfaced. The resulting "pin" is used to locate the
>position of the top of the weight block for drilling purposes. On some
>balls (mostly plastic balls) the rod (pin) is made from the same material
>as the coverstock so it is very hard to see, but "all" bowling balls have
>pins... look a little harder at your "K-mart special" and you will find
>one.
>
So is this ball drilled to roll early? Looks like it to me from where the
pin
is located, I could be wrong though. The balls I have that hook late have
the pin above the finger holes and the ones that roll early have it below
the
holes.

> twobirds wrote:
>> I suppose I need a little advice, and I should give a bit of
>> background...
>>
>> I'm a casual bowler with a low average. I throw a straight ball
>> (standard
>> old K-Mart plastic brunswick ball, BTW). - I was asked by a pal to be a
>> fill in occasionally on his league team that has a couple of members in
>> the
>> Guard and off to Iraq for awhile.
>>
>> Sooo.. I decided to learn how to throw a hook and I talked to a few good
>> bowlers and did some reading looking for a ball that would help me learn
>> to
>> throw a hook... It all came to a consensus that a ball that would skid
>> and
>> then flip would best suit my strength, size, delivery etc; and would mean
>> the smallest adjustment in how I already bowl.
>>
>> The pro-shop guy sold me a Columbia 300 Jekyll. My team-mates etc agreed
>> that it was a reasonable choice for me. Well, it came in today, and the
>> pro-shop guy drilled it fingertip for me. - I threw three games with it
>> today and really didn't have much difficulty adjusting my release to get
>> some revs.. (though I had some trouble trusting the hook and I tended to
>> try
>> pull my release back to the center).... But, anyway:
>>
>> Here is the kicker. Upon inspection of my new ball tonight, I noticed it
>> appears to have been plugged. I think the pro-shop man made a mistake
>> when
>> he started drilling and then had to plug it and then re-drill. Maybe I
>> just
>> don't know what I'm talking about, but http://tinyurl.com/5gcp7 is a
>> picture
>> of the ball, the drilling, and what I beleive must be a plug. Please
>> correct me if I am wrong. Perhaps that orange round dot to the upper
>> right
>> of the Columbia logo is supposed to be there by design?
>>
>> So, here is my dillema: Assuming the pro-shop guy screwed up and had to
>> plug my new ball, should I be upset about it? I doubt it will have any
>> effect on my game (I'm really not very good), but I paid retail price for
>> the ball and the drilling (to the tune of $140.00 USD plus I bought a new
>> towell and bag while I was there today for another $65.00 USD). I don't
>> know enough about this to have any idea if this is a common thing that
>> shouldn't bug me... or if I should go with my "consumer instinct" and
>> expect
>> that a new ball should be drilled properly the first time and that I
>> should
>> have received an immaculate ball.
>>
>> Help?
>>



   
Date: 31 Dec 2004 15:51:43
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
Mudd Bug wrote:

> "Tony R Smith" <tonyrsmith@myrealbox.com> wrote in message
> news:POSAd.42633$Ew6.36670@twister.socal.rr.com...
>
>>A little more insight into what the "pin" is... In the process of making a
>>bowling ball, the weight block is molded around a plastic dowel rod (think
>>of it as a Popsicle stick). The weight block is then suspended in a mold
>>for the inner core and the inner core material is poured around the weight
>>block. The resulting core is then suspended in a mold for the coverstock.
>>When the process is complete, the rod is shaved off level with the ball and
>>the coverstock is surfaced. The resulting "pin" is used to locate the
>>position of the top of the weight block for drilling purposes. On some
>>balls (mostly plastic balls) the rod (pin) is made from the same material
>>as the coverstock so it is very hard to see, but "all" bowling balls have
>>pins... look a little harder at your "K-mart special" and you will find
>>one.
>>
>
> So is this ball drilled to roll early? Looks like it to me from where the
> pin
> is located, I could be wrong though. The balls I have that hook late have
> the pin above the finger holes and the ones that roll early have it below
> the
> holes.

Yes... see my reply to Smokey for further explanation.
>
>
>>twobirds wrote:
>>
>>>I suppose I need a little advice, and I should give a bit of
>>>background...
>>>
>>>I'm a casual bowler with a low average. I throw a straight ball
>>>(standard
>>>old K-Mart plastic brunswick ball, BTW). - I was asked by a pal to be a
>>>fill in occasionally on his league team that has a couple of members in
>>>the
>>>Guard and off to Iraq for awhile.
>>>
>>>Sooo.. I decided to learn how to throw a hook and I talked to a few good
>>>bowlers and did some reading looking for a ball that would help me learn
>>>to
>>>throw a hook... It all came to a consensus that a ball that would skid
>>>and
>>>then flip would best suit my strength, size, delivery etc; and would mean
>>>the smallest adjustment in how I already bowl.
>>>
>>>The pro-shop guy sold me a Columbia 300 Jekyll. My team-mates etc agreed
>>>that it was a reasonable choice for me. Well, it came in today, and the
>>>pro-shop guy drilled it fingertip for me. - I threw three games with it
>>>today and really didn't have much difficulty adjusting my release to get
>>>some revs.. (though I had some trouble trusting the hook and I tended to
>>>try
>>>pull my release back to the center).... But, anyway:
>>>
>>>Here is the kicker. Upon inspection of my new ball tonight, I noticed it
>>>appears to have been plugged. I think the pro-shop man made a mistake
>>>when
>>>he started drilling and then had to plug it and then re-drill. Maybe I
>>>just
>>>don't know what I'm talking about, but http://tinyurl.com/5gcp7 is a
>>>picture
>>>of the ball, the drilling, and what I beleive must be a plug. Please
>>>correct me if I am wrong. Perhaps that orange round dot to the upper
>>>right
>>>of the Columbia logo is supposed to be there by design?
>>>
>>>So, here is my dillema: Assuming the pro-shop guy screwed up and had to
>>>plug my new ball, should I be upset about it? I doubt it will have any
>>>effect on my game (I'm really not very good), but I paid retail price for
>>>the ball and the drilling (to the tune of $140.00 USD plus I bought a new
>>>towell and bag while I was there today for another $65.00 USD). I don't
>>>know enough about this to have any idea if this is a common thing that
>>>shouldn't bug me... or if I should go with my "consumer instinct" and
>>>expect
>>>that a new ball should be drilled properly the first time and that I
>>>should
>>>have received an immaculate ball.
>>>
>>>Help?
>>>
>
>


   
Date: 31 Dec 2004 07:22:03
From: Smokey
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
> So is this ball drilled to roll early? Looks like it to me from where the
> pin
> is located, I could be wrong though. The balls I have that hook late have
> the pin above the finger holes and the ones that roll early have it below
> the
> holes.

Looks like it's drilled in "stacked leverage" configuration. This is, as
far as I know, the "standard method" for drilling a ball UNLESS the Customer
indicates otherwise.

For most bowlers, this will give good flare potential, provided the speed is
kept down (under 17 MPH) and there are decent revs imparted on release.....




    
Date: 31 Dec 2004 15:48:53
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
Sorry Ken, but this is not drilled stacked leverage. Columbia marks
their CG with a dot in the middle of their label. In this case the dot
is located just above the I in "MADE IN U.S.A". This is a "label
leverage" drilling. It is the most common drilling. Having the pin in
the leverage (3⅜" pin to PAP) position maximizes flare, but having the
CG in the palm minimizes the amount of backend reaction you will get.
The overall reaction will be an early midlane read with a mild backend
reaction (i.e. control ball). It is a popular drilling for beginners
because it is less likely to get squirrelly on them, but it lacks the
power that I personally prefer by having the CG kicked outside of the
palm. For this ball to have been drilled stacked leverage (the strongest
and squirrelliest drilling possible) the CG would have had to have been
straight below the pin (also known as a 12:00 drilling). Instead, it is
at a -45° angle to the pin (also known as a 1:30 drilling).

Smokey wrote:
>>So is this ball drilled to roll early? Looks like it to me from where the
>>pin
>>is located, I could be wrong though. The balls I have that hook late have
>>the pin above the finger holes and the ones that roll early have it below
>>the
>>holes.
>
>
> Looks like it's drilled in "stacked leverage" configuration. This is, as
> far as I know, the "standard method" for drilling a ball UNLESS the Customer
> indicates otherwise.
>
> For most bowlers, this will give good flare potential, provided the speed is
> kept down (under 17 MPH) and there are decent revs imparted on release.....
>
>


     
Date: 01 Jan 2005 10:09:07
From: Smokey
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
> Sorry Ken, but this is not drilled stacked leverage.

Thanks for the correction and education. :)

Happy New Year! :)




     
Date: 01 Jan 2005 04:47:48
From: Jeff Rife
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
Tony R Smith (tonyrsmith@myrealbox.com) wrote in alt.sport.bowling:
> It is a popular drilling for beginners
> because it is less likely to get squirrelly on them, but it lacks the
> power that I personally prefer by having the CG kicked outside of the
> palm.

When you say "outside the palm", how far "outside" do you mean? Not
covered by your hand at all with a normal grip, or just not in the
"center"?

--
Jeff Rife


      
Date: 01 Jan 2005 15:34:32
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
I like to drill my strong equipment similar to Storm's Layout #2 RAD
position (c). I intentionally choose low top weight, low pin-out balls
to minimize the size of the balance hole I have to drill. This
combination produces a strong midlane roll with a very strong continuous
backend. This is a very controllable hard arcing ball reaction drilling
pattern. If you like skid-snap reaction, this is not the drilling for
you... but if you like a forgiving yet powerful reaction then this is
most definitely the right drilling pattern.

Note: Storm's drill spec sheet has a typo in the drilling instructions
for Layout #2. When it describe the reactions from picking the RAD
position (RAD is the marking for the Mass Bias on Storm's offset balls),
it talks about positions (a), (b), and (c) when it should be (b), (c),
and (d) (see the Layout #2 picture), so the (c) position which is the
RAD on the PAL (positive axis line) is described as position (b).

http://www.stormbowling.com/pdf/drill_specs/pro.pdf

Jeff Rife wrote:
> Tony R Smith (tonyrsmith@myrealbox.com) wrote in alt.sport.bowling:
>
>> It is a popular drilling for beginners
>>because it is less likely to get squirrelly on them, but it lacks the
>>power that I personally prefer by having the CG kicked outside of the
>>palm.
>
>
> When you say "outside the palm", how far "outside" do you mean? Not
> covered by your hand at all with a normal grip, or just not in the
> "center"?
>


       
Date: 01 Jan 2005 15:45:10
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
I just read Storm's drilling sheet again and the say that PAL is
perpendicular axis line. I've always heard it called the positive axis
line because it the line drawn through the PAP (positive axis point)
parallel to your track. Oh well, my bad.

Tony R Smith wrote:

> I like to drill my strong equipment similar to Storm's Layout #2 RAD
> position (c). I intentionally choose low top weight, low pin-out balls
> to minimize the size of the balance hole I have to drill. This
> combination produces a strong midlane roll with a very strong continuous
> backend. This is a very controllable hard arcing ball reaction drilling
> pattern. If you like skid-snap reaction, this is not the drilling for
> you... but if you like a forgiving yet powerful reaction then this is
> most definitely the right drilling pattern.
>
> Note: Storm's drill spec sheet has a typo in the drilling instructions
> for Layout #2. When it describe the reactions from picking the RAD
> position (RAD is the marking for the Mass Bias on Storm's offset balls),
> it talks about positions (a), (b), and (c) when it should be (b), (c),
> and (d) (see the Layout #2 picture), so the (c) position which is the
> RAD on the PAL (positive axis line) is described as position (b).
>
> http://www.stormbowling.com/pdf/drill_specs/pro.pdf
>
> Jeff Rife wrote:
>
>> Tony R Smith (tonyrsmith@myrealbox.com) wrote in alt.sport.bowling:
>>
>>> It is a popular drilling for beginners
>>> because it is less likely to get squirrelly on them, but it lacks the
>>> power that I personally prefer by having the CG kicked outside of the
>>> palm.
>>
>>
>>
>> When you say "outside the palm", how far "outside" do you mean? Not
>> covered by your hand at all with a normal grip, or just not in the
>> "center"?
>>


     
Date: 31 Dec 2004 11:58:57
From: Joe Zachar
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
Tony, I think I read on the Rollrite website that to get a 12 O'Clock
drilling the pin and mass bias (MB) must be parallel to the bowler's track .

http://www.rollrite.co.uk/secrets.php

Joe Z

Tony R Smith wrote:

> Sorry Ken, but this is not drilled stacked leverage. Columbia marks
> their CG with a dot in the middle of their label. In this case the dot
> is located just above the I in "MADE IN U.S.A". This is a "label
> leverage" drilling. It is the most common drilling. Having the pin in
> the leverage (3⅜" pin to PAP) position maximizes flare, but having the
> CG in the palm minimizes the amount of backend reaction you will get.
> The overall reaction will be an early midlane read with a mild backend
> reaction (i.e. control ball). It is a popular drilling for beginners
> because it is less likely to get squirrelly on them, but it lacks the
> power that I personally prefer by having the CG kicked outside of the
> palm. For this ball to have been drilled stacked leverage (the
> strongest and squirrelliest drilling possible) the CG would have had
> to have been straight below the pin (also known as a 12:00 drilling).
> Instead, it is at a -45° angle to the pin (also known as a 1:30
> drilling).
>
> Smokey wrote:
>
>>> So is this ball drilled to roll early? Looks like it to me from
>>> where the
>>> pin
>>> is located, I could be wrong though. The balls I have that hook late
>>> have
>>> the pin above the finger holes and the ones that roll early have it
>>> below
>>> the
>>> holes.
>>
>>
>>
>> Looks like it's drilled in "stacked leverage" configuration. This
>> is, as
>> far as I know, the "standard method" for drilling a ball UNLESS the
>> Customer
>> indicates otherwise.
>>
>> For most bowlers, this will give good flare potential, provided the
>> speed is
>> kept down (under 17 MPH) and there are decent revs imparted on
>> release.....
>>
>>



      
Date: 01 Jan 2005 08:51:34
From: Tony R Smith
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
That is correct. For most people that will be pin straight above the CG
(hence the term "12 o'clock" which indicates that if the CG were the
center of a clock face, the pin would be in the 12 o'clock position). If
your track is tilted you will have to drill accordingly.

Joe Zachar wrote:
> Tony, I think I read on the Rollrite website that to get a 12 O'Clock
> drilling the pin and mass bias (MB) must be parallel to the bowler's
> track .
>
> http://www.rollrite.co.uk/secrets.php
>
> Joe Z
>
> Tony R Smith wrote:
>
>> Sorry Ken, but this is not drilled stacked leverage. Columbia marks
>> their CG with a dot in the middle of their label. In this case the dot
>> is located just above the I in "MADE IN U.S.A". This is a "label
>> leverage" drilling. It is the most common drilling. Having the pin in
>> the leverage (3⅜" pin to PAP) position maximizes flare, but having the
>> CG in the palm minimizes the amount of backend reaction you will get.
>> The overall reaction will be an early midlane read with a mild backend
>> reaction (i.e. control ball). It is a popular drilling for beginners
>> because it is less likely to get squirrelly on them, but it lacks the
>> power that I personally prefer by having the CG kicked outside of the
>> palm. For this ball to have been drilled stacked leverage (the
>> strongest and squirrelliest drilling possible) the CG would have had
>> to have been straight below the pin (also known as a 12:00 drilling).
>> Instead, it is at a -45° angle to the pin (also known as a 1:30
>> drilling).
>>
>> Smokey wrote:
>>
>>>> So is this ball drilled to roll early? Looks like it to me from
>>>> where the
>>>> pin
>>>> is located, I could be wrong though. The balls I have that hook late
>>>> have
>>>> the pin above the finger holes and the ones that roll early have it
>>>> below
>>>> the
>>>> holes.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Looks like it's drilled in "stacked leverage" configuration. This
>>> is, as
>>> far as I know, the "standard method" for drilling a ball UNLESS the
>>> Customer
>>> indicates otherwise.
>>>
>>> For most bowlers, this will give good flare potential, provided the
>>> speed is
>>> kept down (under 17 MPH) and there are decent revs imparted on
>>> release.....
>>>
>>>
>


 
Date: 30 Dec 2004 08:30:36
From: Ryan Press \(NI\)
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
LOL - no, this is not a plugging.. its the "pin"...

Its meant to be there, and almost ever ball, bar plastic balls and very old
balls have them... the pin is used as a referance point when drilling to
change the reaction you get from the ball.

Ryan



"twobirds" <notareal@eaddy.com > wrote in message
news:d6CdnVll15pjLU7cRVn-hg@bresnan.com...
> I suppose I need a little advice, and I should give a bit of background...
>
> I'm a casual bowler with a low average. I throw a straight ball (standard
> old K-Mart plastic brunswick ball, BTW). - I was asked by a pal to be a
> fill in occasionally on his league team that has a couple of members in
the
> Guard and off to Iraq for awhile.
>
> Sooo.. I decided to learn how to throw a hook and I talked to a few good
> bowlers and did some reading looking for a ball that would help me learn
to
> throw a hook... It all came to a consensus that a ball that would skid
and
> then flip would best suit my strength, size, delivery etc; and would mean
> the smallest adjustment in how I already bowl.
>
> The pro-shop guy sold me a Columbia 300 Jekyll. My team-mates etc agreed
> that it was a reasonable choice for me. Well, it came in today, and the
> pro-shop guy drilled it fingertip for me. - I threw three games with it
> today and really didn't have much difficulty adjusting my release to get
> some revs.. (though I had some trouble trusting the hook and I tended to
try
> pull my release back to the center).... But, anyway:
>
> Here is the kicker. Upon inspection of my new ball tonight, I noticed it
> appears to have been plugged. I think the pro-shop man made a mistake when
> he started drilling and then had to plug it and then re-drill. Maybe I
just
> don't know what I'm talking about, but http://tinyurl.com/5gcp7 is a
picture
> of the ball, the drilling, and what I beleive must be a plug. Please
> correct me if I am wrong. Perhaps that orange round dot to the upper
right
> of the Columbia logo is supposed to be there by design?
>
> So, here is my dillema: Assuming the pro-shop guy screwed up and had to
> plug my new ball, should I be upset about it? I doubt it will have any
> effect on my game (I'm really not very good), but I paid retail price for
> the ball and the drilling (to the tune of $140.00 USD plus I bought a new
> towell and bag while I was there today for another $65.00 USD). I don't
> know enough about this to have any idea if this is a common thing that
> shouldn't bug me... or if I should go with my "consumer instinct" and
expect
> that a new ball should be drilled properly the first time and that I
should
> have received an immaculate ball.
>
> Help?
>
>




 
Date: 30 Dec 2004 08:06:35
From: Evil Joe Schmuckatelli
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 07:42:55 UTC, "twobirds" <notareal@eaddy.com > wrote:

> Perhaps that orange round dot to the upper right
> of the Columbia logo is supposed to be there by design?

That is correct. If you do a Google search, you'll see reference to "white
dot" and "yellow dot" in reference to Columbia balls. (I myself have an old
Aftershock which has a yellow dot.) Don't ask me what it's there for (there
are far more knowledgeable people here who can tell you) but no, it's not a
mistake that the proshoperator plugged up.

Besides, even if it was, it wouldn't be an issue unless it was in the track
area, and judging from the placement, that doesn't appear to be the case.

------------------------------------------------+------------------
"One World, One Web, One Program." -- Microsoft


  
Date: 30 Dec 2004 01:49:14
From: twobirds
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
Evil Joe Schmuckatelli wrote:
> On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 07:42:55 UTC, "twobirds" <notareal@eaddy.com>
> wrote:

>
> That is correct. If you do a Google search, you'll see reference to
> "white dot" and "yellow dot" in reference to Columbia balls.

Thanks. You've saved me from embarrassing myself by going off half-cocked
and bitching at the pro-shop man when he doesn't deserve it.

I'm afraid that the McDonald's drive-through has ruined my consumer
confidence. ;)





   
Date: 30 Dec 2004 13:10:35
From: John O
Subject: Re: I think the pro shop plugged my new ball...
> Thanks. You've saved me from embarrassing myself by going off half-cocked
> and bitching at the pro-shop man when he doesn't deserve it.

And, IMHO he did a pretty decent job with those inserts, too. Good Luck with
your new ball. :-)

-John O