bowling-forum.net
The bowlers choice for bowling chat.

Main
Date: 07 Mar 2008 16:34:46
From:
Subject: Cleaning Bowling Ball
Hi All

I have an NV Total which I really like, I have read about various ways
to help clean / remove the oil that is absorbed into the ball, ranging
from the sublime to the extreme, I was wondering if any other bowlers
have used different methods sucessfully to remove the embedded oil

Thanks

Colin




 
Date: 26 Mar 2008 19:22:36
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
> Well, as I started this thread, I suppose I should update all on what
> I have done to 'bleed' my ball
> I have washed my spare ball ( Red Hammer) , yes, old I know but still
> works great for a straight shot,
> in the dish washer, using a couple of drops of dish detergent (as
> opposed to dish washer fluid)
> using the pots and pans setting, but had the heat / drying switched
> off, the ball came out with slight white
> residue on it, but wiped off easy enough, I will try the NV Total once
> I end the season in 4 weeks, as I don't want to mess with the way the
> ball currently reacts.
> No real changes in the way the Hammer reacts, so I guess things went
> ok, however, this is not my hook ball.

A "straight" urethane ball like your Red Hammer probably won't show as
dramatic a result as the total NV. However, I bet it's a lot cleaner
overall than it was, right? :)

The "white residue" ** MAY ** be evaporated minerals, etc. from your
water (assuming you have "hard" water). Since you indicate you were
able to easily wipe it off, I'll bet that's what it was.

Finally, you might want to give that Hammer a LIGHT resurfacing - that
may give it a little more "bite" on the lane, but (hopefully?) not
enough to force any major "adjustments"... :)

Anyhoo, good luck and please keep us apprised of your "Adventures In
Dishwashing". :)


 
Date: 26 Mar 2008 13:33:22
From:
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
On Mar 13, 7:26=A0am, "John O" <johnospama...@lottaspamheathkit.com >
wrote:
> > Flare helps because as the ball comes off the oil, it has dry ball surfa=
ce
> > in contact with the lane. No ball absorbs oil fast enough to still get
> > friction in the oil, but it might increase the back end friction in the
> > bow tie areas, I guess.
>
> Flare is a symptom of the core trying to straighten itself out. That it
> presents a fresh surface to the lane is a bonus.
>
> Dang, from chemistry to physics in the same thread, and I'm no good at
> either subject. :-)
>
> -John O

Well, as I started this thread, I suppose I should update all on what
I have done to 'bleed' my ball
I have washed my spare ball ( Red Hammer) , yes, old I know but still
works great for a straight shot,
in the dish washer, using a couple of drops of dish detergent (as
opposed to dish washer fluid)
using the pots and pans setting, but had the heat / drying switched
off, the ball came out with slight white
residue on it, but wiped off easy enough, I will try the NV Total once
I end the season in 4 weeks, as I don't want to mess with the way the
ball currently reacts.
No real changes in the way the Hammer reacts, so I guess things went
ok, however, this is not my hook ball.

Thanks to all for the suggestions

Colin in Surrey, BC


 
Date: 12 Mar 2008 13:29:57
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
> I have anecdotal evidence that it is oil as when cooking, if I pay
> frequent attention to the ball, the last area to weep is the track,
> exactly where you would expect the greatest concentration of oil.
> Also, if I am slowly turning my strike ball into a spare ball, why
> does the reaction come back with a vengance after cooking?

If one looks at electron micrographs (and similar high-magnification
imagery) of various ball surfaces, one sees it's the BALL SURFACE that
determines its' "traction" characteristics. This article from the
USBC "ball research" series illustrates this statement:
http://www.bowl.com/articleView.aspx?i=12843&f=21

As you can see the "reactive" surface resembles a "sponge", which is
probably why it absorbs oil. The main reason the "track" area is the
last to "weep" is that part of the ball is essentially "compressed"
and has reduced porosity, much like skin that has "skin protector" on
it - it's the last place to "perspire, etc." The compressed area is
only a thousandth of an inch (0.001") or so deep. Not much to see
using naked eyes, but a lot when you get down to the "shell level,
etc."

"Sanding" the ball, either with sandpaper or "scrubby pad" material,
essentially removes that "compressed" area - like peeling off the
"skin protector". It restores the cover's "porosity" in that area, so
it can Do Its' Job again. Of course, there is a limit on how many
"sandings" you can do because there is a MINIMUM ball diameter
mandated by USBC rules. :) Besides, once you take that much material
off, it's probably time for a new ball anyway...

The "sponge" analogy is simply this: the best sponge for use is a DRY
one as it'll absorb the most water. As the sponge "fills" with water,
it loses its' "sponging" ability, requiring the occasional "wringing
out". "Sweating" the ball accomplishes the same function, using heat
rather than "mechanical" forces to draw the oil out.

> For your info, my balls have been cooked about a dozen times.
>
> I am a convert to the cooking method...

Maybe we need to develop a "ball care" video to help bowlers? we could
probably call it "Resin Chef"? (smirk!)


 
Date: 11 Mar 2008 21:49:55
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
> =A0 =A0 I hear of many people using the dishwasher method. I don't know ex=
actly
> how they do it, but.......You do not want to put it on the high heat cycle=
!

Dishwasher method:

1. Ensure the dishwasher HEATS THE WATER (most do these days). If
yours doesn't, make sure the water feeding the dishwasher is as hot as
is possible/practical for your heater.
2. You can cover the holes with tape or not. If you do, make sure the
tape you use has "heat-resistant" adhesive and only use enough to
COVER each hole, with a small "margin" (i.e., 1/4") of extra tape to
ensure it stays over the hole.
3. Put TWO ** SMALL DROPS ** of liquid dish soap (i.e., "Dawn") in the
soap container. Any more than this and you'll have a very wet and
soapy mess to clean up!
4. Place the ball in the LOWER DISH RACK, preferably near the FRONT of
the rack. If you DO NOT cover the holes with tape, have the holes
POINTING DOWN for drainiage. If you DO use tape, have the holes
POINTING UP or TO THE SIDE.
5. Start the dishwasher using the "Pots and Pans" (i.e., LONG) cycle
and let it complete through the FINAL RINSE cycle. The heated water,
combined with the detergent, will "sweat" the ball and, especially in
the wash cycle, remove the majority of "sweated stuff" from the ball's
surface.
6. IMMEDIATELY remove the ball after the final rinse and put it on a
table/counter on a folded bath towel. If you DID NOT use tape on the
holes, position the ball HOLES DOWN on the towl for drainage. If you
DID use tape, now is the time to remove it and, again, put it on the
towel HOLES DOWN.
7. Let the ball air-dry a few hours (overnight is better!).
8. After the ball is cool and dry, and if you used tape, use a paper
towel wetted with 90+% (i.e. "needle-grade") ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL to
remove any remaining tape adhesive. Then LIGHTLY "scrub" the surface
with a DRY Scotch-Brite pad to help open the "pores" of the
coverstock. Use circular "strokes" and try to hit the entire
surface. When done, you should see VERY LIGHT (not deep) scuff marks
on the surface (they won't affect ball performance). Wipe off any
"dust" with a damp paper towel.
9. If desired, apply your Favorite Finishing Substance (polish,
buffing paste, etc.) to the cover using the Manufacturer's Recommended
Application Method(s).
10. Your ball is now ready to "hit the lanes" until the next
"sweating" is required. :)

Many people have reported very good results with this method. YMMV,
depending on the age of the ball and when it was last "sweated
out". :)

FWIW, I tried a variation of this method and I PERSONALLY didn't get
as good a result as using my oven... :)

Good luck to all who try any of these methods....


 
Date: 11 Mar 2008 18:59:39
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
> I'd be more worried about putting a dirty bowling ball in the oven
> where I cook food, LOL!

Oh, it ain't so bad - the smell of "rare" bowling ball disappears
after a couple of hours. Plus, I have a Special Holder to catch any
"drips" that might occur... ;)


 
Date: 11 Mar 2008 14:46:15
From:
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
On Mar 11, 5:36=A0pm, PromptJock <102151.3...@compuserve.com > wrote:
> > But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.
>
> These days I "cook" my balls (Brunswick "Strike Zone" and "Total
> Inferno") every 3-4 weeks as I average 20-25 games/week on each ball
> (5 leagues/week). =A0I can tell when they need "cooking" when:
>
> =A0* the cover acquires a "sheen" (I keep the surfaces DULL)
> =A0* a clean "micro-fiber" towel won't remove the oil - it just "smears"
> it over the surface
> =A0* when I put my DRY hand on the ball's surface, the cover becomes
> "slimy" where my skin touched the ball
> =A0* I can't fully clean the surface with "409" (cleaner of choice),
> "Windex", or even 90+% isopropyl
>
> Similar to Baldy, I use my oven set to its' lowest setting (170
> degrees, per the display), heat one ball for 10-15 min, hit it with
> "409" and wipe it off, repeat the cycle once or twice more, then let
> the ball sit and cool for 30+ min. =A0I'll then do the same for my other
> ball if I deem it necessary. =A0If I don't think the ball is fully
> "sweated", I'll repeat the cycles (it usually only takes 2 sets of
> "cycles") then let the ball sit overnight.
>
> So far, I haven't had any problems with coverstock cracking or
> deterioration, though I do detect the balls are a little more
> "absorbant" than when I first got them a couple years ago. :)

I'd be more worried about putting a dirty bowling ball in the oven
where I cook food, LOL!

T


  
Date: 12 Mar 2008 18:47:17
From: 6ballman
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball


Twp1976@gmail.com wrote:
> On Mar 11, 5:36 pm, PromptJock <102151.3...@compuserve.com> wrote:
>
>>> But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.
>>>
>> These days I "cook" my balls (Brunswick "Strike Zone" and "Total
>> Inferno") every 3-4 weeks as I average 20-25 games/week on each ball
>> (5 leagues/week). I can tell when they need "cooking" when:
>>
>> * the cover acquires a "sheen" (I keep the surfaces DULL)
>> * a clean "micro-fiber" towel won't remove the oil - it just "smears"
>> it over the surface
>> * when I put my DRY hand on the ball's surface, the cover becomes
>> "slimy" where my skin touched the ball
>> * I can't fully clean the surface with "409" (cleaner of choice),
>> "Windex", or even 90+% isopropyl
>>
>> Similar to Baldy, I use my oven set to its' lowest setting (170
>> degrees, per the display), heat one ball for 10-15 min, hit it with
>> "409" and wipe it off, repeat the cycle once or twice more, then let
>> the ball sit and cool for 30+ min. I'll then do the same for my other
>> ball if I deem it necessary. If I don't think the ball is fully
>> "sweated", I'll repeat the cycles (it usually only takes 2 sets of
>> "cycles") then let the ball sit overnight.
>>
>> So far, I haven't had any problems with coverstock cracking or
>> deterioration, though I do detect the balls are a little more
>> "absorbant" than when I first got them a couple years ago. :)
>>
>
> I'd be more worried about putting a dirty bowling ball in the oven
> where I cook food, LOL!
>
> T
>
You should have seen my wife's reaction when she came home and found 4
bowling balls in the dishwasher...

--
Get your hambone gear here...
http://www.cafepress.com/dekay_sales


 
Date: 11 Mar 2008 14:36:21
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
> But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.

These days I "cook" my balls (Brunswick "Strike Zone" and "Total
Inferno") every 3-4 weeks as I average 20-25 games/week on each ball
(5 leagues/week). I can tell when they need "cooking" when:

* the cover acquires a "sheen" (I keep the surfaces DULL)
* a clean "micro-fiber" towel won't remove the oil - it just "smears"
it over the surface
* when I put my DRY hand on the ball's surface, the cover becomes
"slimy" where my skin touched the ball
* I can't fully clean the surface with "409" (cleaner of choice),
"Windex", or even 90+% isopropyl

Similar to Baldy, I use my oven set to its' lowest setting (170
degrees, per the display), heat one ball for 10-15 min, hit it with
"409" and wipe it off, repeat the cycle once or twice more, then let
the ball sit and cool for 30+ min. I'll then do the same for my other
ball if I deem it necessary. If I don't think the ball is fully
"sweated", I'll repeat the cycles (it usually only takes 2 sets of
"cycles") then let the ball sit overnight.

So far, I haven't had any problems with coverstock cracking or
deterioration, though I do detect the balls are a little more
"absorbant" than when I first got them a couple years ago. :)


 
Date: 10 Mar 2008 22:04:20
From:
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
On Mar 7, 11:03=A0pm, PromptJock <102151.3...@compuserve.com > wrote:
> > I have an NV Total which I really like, I have read about various ways
> > to help clean / remove the oil that is absorbed into the ball, ranging
> > from the sublime to the extreme, I was wondering if any other bowlers
> > have used different methods sucessfully to remove the embedded oil
>
> The ** ABSOLUTELY SAFEST ** method for oil extraction is ** take it to
> your PRO SHOP and have it done there **! "They're The Experts" and, if
> they should F-up the ball, they'll be obligated to replace it (or risk
> losing your future business).
>
> If, however, you want to Do It Yourself, there are many, many threads
> in this newsgroup on "How I 'bleed my ball, etc.'" (myself
> included :) ).
>
> In a nutshell, here's the procedure for removing the absorbed oil
> (after every 60-100 10-frame games):
>
> =A0 1. Apply "low-level" (<180 degree F) wet or dry heat to "sweat" the
> oil from the ball (15-20 minutes exposure)
> =A0 2. Removing the "oily sweat" with a surfactant agent (Windex, "409")
> =A0 3. Repeating steps 1 & 2 until the ball stops (or severely reduces)
> its' "sweating" (3-5 "cycles", depending on how much oil is in the
> ball)
> =A0 4. Letting the ball air-dry (and cool-off) at least overnight
> =A0 5. "Resurface" the ball (using sandpaper or a dry "Scotch-brite"
> pad) to reduce/remove the accumulated track and "open up" the shell's
> "pores"
>
> Granted, the ball will NEVER, EVER get back to when it was "out of the
> box", but you can at least keep it at a 90+% performance level by
> doing the above steps.
>
> Hope this helps. :)

A guy in the pro-shop (great bowler) years ago suggested that I put my
ball in the oven. No joke. Anybody do that?

T


  
Date: 11 Mar 2008 19:00:53
From: Baldy Man
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 22:04:20 -0700 (PDT), Twp1976@gmail.com wrote:

[SNIP]
>
>A guy in the pro-shop (great bowler) years ago suggested that I put my
>ball in the oven. No joke. Anybody do that?
>
>T
I cook my Double Agent and Warp Zones about every 100 games in an oven
at work, I use a temperature of 65 degC (thats 150 deg F for the non
metric) and wipe the ball off every 10 minutes with isopropyl alcohol.
After about an hour the weeping completely stops and I slowly cool the
ball in the oven over about another hour. (I was told by a pro that
the core can detach from the coverstock if you cool it too quickly).
It rejuvenates the ball to close to new condition and a quick
Scothbrite does the final trick. My process sounds about the same as
described above but a little better controlled as I work in a
laboratory...

Some guys in my league actually put their ball in the dish washer with
the holes taped up. I never had the nerve to try it but they swear by
the process....


   
Date: 12 Mar 2008 03:46:37
From: Darby
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball

"Baldy Man" <
>
> [SNIP]
>>
>>A guy in the pro-shop (great bowler) years ago suggested that I put my
>>ball in the oven. No joke. Anybody do that?
>>
>>T
> I cook my Double Agent and Warp Zones about every 100 games in an oven
> at work, I use a temperature of 65 degC (thats 150 deg F for the non
> metric) and wipe the ball off every 10 minutes with isopropyl alcohol.
> After about an hour the weeping completely stops and I slowly cool the
> ball in the oven over about another hour. (I was told by a pro that
> the core can detach from the coverstock if you cool it too quickly).
> It rejuvenates the ball to close to new condition and a quick
> Scothbrite does the final trick. My process sounds about the same as
> described above but a little better controlled as I work in a
> laboratory...
>
> Some guys in my league actually put their ball in the dish washer with
> the holes taped up. I never had the nerve to try it but they swear by
> the process....
The baking method is loved by some and heartily discouraged by others. Some
time ago we had a scientist who bowls in Australia explain in great detail
why it is a bad idea. One thing he said was that chemical testing showed
that the substance coming from the ball is resin, not oil. That we were
turning our balls into spare balls.
I hear of many people using the dishwasher method. I don't know exactly
how they do it, but.......You do not want to put it on the high heat cycle!
Dar




    
Date: 13 Mar 2008 01:19:11
From: Rob
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
I'm still here, sometimes. :)
Rob.

"Darby" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com > wrote in message
news:xmIBj.18879$TT4.9334@attbi_s22...
>
> "Baldy Man" <
>>
>> [SNIP]
>>>
>>>A guy in the pro-shop (great bowler) years ago suggested that I put my
>>>ball in the oven. No joke. Anybody do that?
>>>
>>>T
>> I cook my Double Agent and Warp Zones about every 100 games in an oven
>> at work, I use a temperature of 65 degC (thats 150 deg F for the non
>> metric) and wipe the ball off every 10 minutes with isopropyl alcohol.
>> After about an hour the weeping completely stops and I slowly cool the
>> ball in the oven over about another hour. (I was told by a pro that
>> the core can detach from the coverstock if you cool it too quickly).
>> It rejuvenates the ball to close to new condition and a quick
>> Scothbrite does the final trick. My process sounds about the same as
>> described above but a little better controlled as I work in a
>> laboratory...
>>
>> Some guys in my league actually put their ball in the dish washer with
>> the holes taped up. I never had the nerve to try it but they swear by
>> the process....
> The baking method is loved by some and heartily discouraged by others.
> Some time ago we had a scientist who bowls in Australia explain in great
> detail why it is a bad idea. One thing he said was that chemical testing
> showed that the substance coming from the ball is resin, not oil. That we
> were turning our balls into spare balls.
> I hear of many people using the dishwasher method. I don't know exactly
> how they do it, but.......You do not want to put it on the high heat
> cycle!
> Dar
>




     
Date: 12 Mar 2008 17:08:47
From: Darby
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
Hey Rob....good to hear from you. I hope all is well with you and your
family. How's the game going? I replaced one knee last Spring and will
replace the other in a couple weeks. My average has dropped over 50 pins in
the past few years. I hope to get some of that back once I can be solid at
the line again.
Dar

"Rob" <robbie.buckley@optusnet.com.au > wrote
> I'm still here, sometimes. :)
> Rob.
>
> "Darby" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com> wrote in message
> news:xmIBj.18879$TT4.9334@attbi_s22...
>>
>> "Baldy Man" <
>>>
>>> [SNIP]
>>>>
>>>>A guy in the pro-shop (great bowler) years ago suggested that I put my
>>>>ball in the oven. No joke. Anybody do that?
>>>>
>>>>T
>>> I cook my Double Agent and Warp Zones about every 100 games in an oven
>>> at work, I use a temperature of 65 degC (thats 150 deg F for the non
>>> metric) and wipe the ball off every 10 minutes with isopropyl alcohol.
>>> After about an hour the weeping completely stops and I slowly cool the
>>> ball in the oven over about another hour. (I was told by a pro that
>>> the core can detach from the coverstock if you cool it too quickly).
>>> It rejuvenates the ball to close to new condition and a quick
>>> Scothbrite does the final trick. My process sounds about the same as
>>> described above but a little better controlled as I work in a
>>> laboratory...
>>>
>>> Some guys in my league actually put their ball in the dish washer with
>>> the holes taped up. I never had the nerve to try it but they swear by
>>> the process....
>> The baking method is loved by some and heartily discouraged by others.
>> Some time ago we had a scientist who bowls in Australia explain in great
>> detail why it is a bad idea. One thing he said was that chemical testing
>> showed that the substance coming from the ball is resin, not oil. That we
>> were turning our balls into spare balls.
>> I hear of many people using the dishwasher method. I don't know
>> exactly how they do it, but.......You do not want to put it on the high
>> heat cycle!
>> Dar
>>
>
>




      
Date: 13 Mar 2008 09:09:42
From: Rob
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball


"Darby" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com > wrote in message
news:z6UBj.72644$yE1.16246@attbi_s21...
> Hey Rob....good to hear from you. I hope all is well with you and your
> family. How's the game going? I replaced one knee last Spring and will
> replace the other in a couple weeks. My average has dropped over 50 pins
> in the past few years. I hope to get some of that back once I can be solid
> at the line again.
> Dar

Hi Darby.. All good down under. Actually running a bowling centre atm, plus
working a few hours at the local uni as chemical waste disposal officer.
Game is going well, shot my 3rd 800 a few weeks back. Getting too old to
wind the ball up any more, so I'm returning to being more of a stroker, and
starting to enjoy bowling again.
Good luck with the knee replacements, those pins will come back soon enough.
Cheers, Rob.




   
Date: 11 Mar 2008 19:24:32
From: John O
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball

"Baldy Man" <baldyman@thebarbers.com > wrote in message
news:t9ldt3lgc7qsnqddjeih8h6mrdn8llp48q@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 22:04:20 -0700 (PDT), Twp1976@gmail.com wrote:
>
> [SNIP]
>>
>>A guy in the pro-shop (great bowler) years ago suggested that I put my
>>ball in the oven. No joke. Anybody do that?
>>
>>T
> I cook my Double Agent and Warp Zones about every 100 games in an oven
> at work, I use a temperature of 65 degC (thats 150 deg F for the non
> metric) and wipe the ball off every 10 minutes with isopropyl alcohol.
> After about an hour the weeping completely stops

A guy who used to post here has access to some chemical analysis stuff. He
did the same thing with a chunk of an old ball, and there was no oil in the
stuff that weeped out. It was resin.

But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.

-John O





    
Date: 12 Mar 2008 17:54:23
From: Baldy Man
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
[SNIP]
>
>A guy who used to post here has access to some chemical analysis stuff. He
>did the same thing with a chunk of an old ball, and there was no oil in the
>stuff that weeped out. It was resin.
>
>But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.
>
>-John O
>
>

I too an a chemist and although I haven't done any analysis, I find it
difficult to believe it is resin coming out. (a) because the monomers
are dangerous and would present a huge health hazard and (b) it isn't
good practice to mix resins in non reacting proportions as it is just
a waste of money and resin.

I have anecdotal evidence that it is oil as when cooking, if I pay
frequent attention to the ball, the last area to weep is the track,
exactly where you would expect the greatest concentration of oil.
Also, if I am slowly turning my strike ball into a spare ball, why
does the reaction come back with a vengance after cooking?

For your info, my balls have been cooked about a dozen times.

I am a convert to the cooking method...


     
Date: 13 Mar 2008 09:18:19
From: Rob
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball

"Baldy Man" <baldyman@thebarbers.com > wrote in message
news:9q5gt39eo2ps6fmkb03qfg74evcebje7rj@4ax.com...
> [SNIP]
>>
>>A guy who used to post here has access to some chemical analysis stuff. He
>>did the same thing with a chunk of an old ball, and there was no oil in
>>the
>>stuff that weeped out. It was resin.
>>
>>But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.
>>
>>-John O
>>
>>
>
> I too an a chemist and although I haven't done any analysis, I find it
> difficult to believe it is resin coming out. (a) because the monomers
> are dangerous and would present a huge health hazard and (b) it isn't
> good practice to mix resins in non reacting proportions as it is just
> a waste of money and resin.

Not monomers, although as a chemist that is the obvious assumption. What the
ball companies call resin is a liquid filler (I'd say plasticiser, but not
too many polymers are 10-15% plasticiser). Look up 'polymer alloy bowling
ball' on the USPTO site.
For my (admittedly limited) testing, see this thread:
http://groups.google.com.au/group/alt.sport.bowling/browse_thread/thread/7439c5688662ef6a/de233df999b9420d?hl=en&lnk=st&q=gas+chromatograph+sd73#

Cheers, Rob.

> I have anecdotal evidence that it is oil as when cooking, if I pay
> frequent attention to the ball, the last area to weep is the track,
> exactly where you would expect the greatest concentration of oil.
> Also, if I am slowly turning my strike ball into a spare ball, why
> does the reaction come back with a vengance after cooking?
>
> For your info, my balls have been cooked about a dozen times.
>
> I am a convert to the cooking method...




      
Date: 13 Mar 2008 02:25:38
From: John O
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
Thanks, Rob. It's been a while (five years!) and I couldn't remember the
details, although I clearly remember parts of that thread.

-John O

"Rob" <robbie.buckley@optusnet.com.au > wrote in message
news:47d864bb$0$4706$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
>
> "Baldy Man" <baldyman@thebarbers.com> wrote in message
> news:9q5gt39eo2ps6fmkb03qfg74evcebje7rj@4ax.com...
>> [SNIP]
>>>
>>>A guy who used to post here has access to some chemical analysis stuff.
>>>He
>>>did the same thing with a chunk of an old ball, and there was no oil in
>>>the
>>>stuff that weeped out. It was resin.
>>>
>>>But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.
>>>
>>>-John O
>>>
>>>
>>
>> I too an a chemist and although I haven't done any analysis, I find it
>> difficult to believe it is resin coming out. (a) because the monomers
>> are dangerous and would present a huge health hazard and (b) it isn't
>> good practice to mix resins in non reacting proportions as it is just
>> a waste of money and resin.
>
> Not monomers, although as a chemist that is the obvious assumption. What
> the ball companies call resin is a liquid filler (I'd say plasticiser, but
> not too many polymers are 10-15% plasticiser). Look up 'polymer alloy
> bowling ball' on the USPTO site.
> For my (admittedly limited) testing, see this thread:
> http://groups.google.com.au/group/alt.sport.bowling/browse_thread/thread/7439c5688662ef6a/de233df999b9420d?hl=en&lnk=st&q=gas+chromatograph+sd73#
>
> Cheers, Rob.
>
>> I have anecdotal evidence that it is oil as when cooking, if I pay
>> frequent attention to the ball, the last area to weep is the track,
>> exactly where you would expect the greatest concentration of oil.
>> Also, if I am slowly turning my strike ball into a spare ball, why
>> does the reaction come back with a vengance after cooking?
>>
>> For your info, my balls have been cooked about a dozen times.
>>
>> I am a convert to the cooking method...
>
>




      
Date: 13 Mar 2008 00:46:57
From: Baldy Man
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
On Thu, 13 Mar 2008 09:18:19 +1000, "Rob"
<robbie.buckley@optusnet.com.au > wrote:

>
>"Baldy Man" <baldyman@thebarbers.com> wrote in message
>news:9q5gt39eo2ps6fmkb03qfg74evcebje7rj@4ax.com...
>> [SNIP]
>>>
>>>A guy who used to post here has access to some chemical analysis stuff. He
>>>did the same thing with a chunk of an old ball, and there was no oil in
>>>the
>>>stuff that weeped out. It was resin.
>>>
>>>But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.
>>>
>>>-John O
>>>
>>>
>>
>> I too an a chemist and although I haven't done any analysis, I find it
>> difficult to believe it is resin coming out. (a) because the monomers
>> are dangerous and would present a huge health hazard and (b) it isn't
>> good practice to mix resins in non reacting proportions as it is just
>> a waste of money and resin.
>
>Not monomers, although as a chemist that is the obvious assumption. What the
>ball companies call resin is a liquid filler (I'd say plasticiser, but not
>too many polymers are 10-15% plasticiser). Look up 'polymer alloy bowling
>ball' on the USPTO site.
>For my (admittedly limited) testing, see this thread:
>http://groups.google.com.au/group/alt.sport.bowling/browse_thread/thread/7439c5688662ef6a/de233df999b9420d?hl=en&lnk=st&q=gas+chromatograph+sd73#
>
>Cheers, Rob.
>
That is really interesting and I can't argue with a gas chromatograph.
I was told by my pro shop guy that reactive balls work by absorbing
the oil on the track so that the ball surface runs on the lane not an
oil film and this increases the traction to allow the hook. He also
explained that was why flare worked as it presented a fresh surface to
the oil as the ball rotates. (A bit over simplified but I can see what
he was saying) I figured that there was some truth as the oil track
disappears quickly after the ballis returned and I put this down to
absorbtion. It couldn't be evaporation or the lane would be bone dry.
The improvement in reaction after cooking is probably down to the
pores being emptied of either resin filler or oil.

Probably not what the manufacturers wanted but it seems to work.

Thanks for the info. I seem to learn something new every time I come
here,


       
Date: 13 Mar 2008 09:03:18
From: Kirwan Tenpin
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball

"Baldy Man" <baldyman@thebarbers.com > wrote in message
news:p0ugt3508ldkf5dkc6lop000o98ocs6b8h@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 13 Mar 2008 09:18:19 +1000, "Rob"
> <robbie.buckley@optusnet.com.au> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Baldy Man" <baldyman@thebarbers.com> wrote in message
>>news:9q5gt39eo2ps6fmkb03qfg74evcebje7rj@4ax.com...
>>> [SNIP]
>>>>
>>>>A guy who used to post here has access to some chemical analysis stuff.
>>>>He
>>>>did the same thing with a chunk of an old ball, and there was no oil in
>>>>the
>>>>stuff that weeped out. It was resin.
>>>>
>>>>But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.
>>>>
>>>>-John O
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> I too an a chemist and although I haven't done any analysis, I find it
>>> difficult to believe it is resin coming out. (a) because the monomers
>>> are dangerous and would present a huge health hazard and (b) it isn't
>>> good practice to mix resins in non reacting proportions as it is just
>>> a waste of money and resin.
>>
>>Not monomers, although as a chemist that is the obvious assumption. What
>>the
>>ball companies call resin is a liquid filler (I'd say plasticiser, but not
>>too many polymers are 10-15% plasticiser). Look up 'polymer alloy bowling
>>ball' on the USPTO site.
>>For my (admittedly limited) testing, see this thread:
>>http://groups.google.com.au/group/alt.sport.bowling/browse_thread/thread/7439c5688662ef6a/de233df999b9420d?hl=en&lnk=st&q=gas+chromatograph+sd73#
>>
>>Cheers, Rob.
>>
> That is really interesting and I can't argue with a gas chromatograph.
> I was told by my pro shop guy that reactive balls work by absorbing
> the oil on the track so that the ball surface runs on the lane not an
> oil film and this increases the traction to allow the hook. He also
> explained that was why flare worked as it presented a fresh surface to
> the oil as the ball rotates. (A bit over simplified but I can see what
> he was saying) I figured that there was some truth as the oil track
> disappears quickly after the ballis returned and I put this down to
> absorbtion. It couldn't be evaporation or the lane would be bone dry.
> The improvement in reaction after cooking is probably down to the
> pores being emptied of either resin filler or oil.
>
> Probably not what the manufacturers wanted but it seems to work.
>
> Thanks for the info. I seem to learn something new every time I come
> here,

Flare helps because as the ball comes off the oil, it has dry ball surface
in contact with the lane. No ball absorbs oil fast enough to still get
friction in the oil, but it might increase the back end friction in the bow
tie areas, I guess.




        
Date: 13 Mar 2008 10:26:33
From: John O
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
> Flare helps because as the ball comes off the oil, it has dry ball surface
> in contact with the lane. No ball absorbs oil fast enough to still get
> friction in the oil, but it might increase the back end friction in the
> bow tie areas, I guess.
>

Flare is a symptom of the core trying to straighten itself out. That it
presents a fresh surface to the lane is a bonus.

Dang, from chemistry to physics in the same thread, and I'm no good at
either subject. :-)

-John O





     
Date: 12 Mar 2008 15:50:51
From: John O
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball

"Baldy Man" <baldyman@thebarbers.com > wrote in message
news:9q5gt39eo2ps6fmkb03qfg74evcebje7rj@4ax.com...
> [SNIP]
>>
>>A guy who used to post here has access to some chemical analysis stuff. He
>>did the same thing with a chunk of an old ball, and there was no oil in
>>the
>>stuff that weeped out. It was resin.
>>
>>But, I'm still curious how many times total you have cooked your balls.
>>
>>-John O
>>
>>
>
> I too an a chemist and although I haven't done any analysis, I find it
> difficult to believe it is resin coming out. (a) because the monomers
> are dangerous and would present a huge health hazard and (b) it isn't
> good practice to mix resins in non reacting proportions as it is just
> a waste of money and resin.
>
> I have anecdotal evidence that it is oil as when cooking, if I pay
> frequent attention to the ball, the last area to weep is the track,
> exactly where you would expect the greatest concentration of oil.
> Also, if I am slowly turning my strike ball into a spare ball, why
> does the reaction come back with a vengance after cooking?
>
> For your info, my balls have been cooked about a dozen times.
>
> I am a convert to the cooking method...

Well, can't argue with success. :-)

-John O




 
Date: 07 Mar 2008 19:03:09
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: Cleaning Bowling Ball
> I have an NV Total which I really like, I have read about various ways
> to help clean / remove the oil that is absorbed into the ball, ranging
> from the sublime to the extreme, I was wondering if any other bowlers
> have used different methods sucessfully to remove the embedded oil

The ** ABSOLUTELY SAFEST ** method for oil extraction is ** take it to
your PRO SHOP and have it done there **! "They're The Experts" and, if
they should F-up the ball, they'll be obligated to replace it (or risk
losing your future business).

If, however, you want to Do It Yourself, there are many, many threads
in this newsgroup on "How I 'bleed my ball, etc.'" (myself
included :) ).

In a nutshell, here's the procedure for removing the absorbed oil
(after every 60-100 10-frame games):

1. Apply "low-level" (<180 degree F) wet or dry heat to "sweat" the
oil from the ball (15-20 minutes exposure)
2. Removing the "oily sweat" with a surfactant agent (Windex, "409")
3. Repeating steps 1 & 2 until the ball stops (or severely reduces)
its' "sweating" (3-5 "cycles", depending on how much oil is in the
ball)
4. Letting the ball air-dry (and cool-off) at least overnight
5. "Resurface" the ball (using sandpaper or a dry "Scotch-brite"
pad) to reduce/remove the accumulated track and "open up" the shell's
"pores"

Granted, the ball will NEVER, EVER get back to when it was "out of the
box", but you can at least keep it at a 90+% performance level by
doing the above steps.

Hope this helps. :)