bowling-forum.net
The bowlers choice for bowling chat.

Main
Date: 17 Dec 2008 12:43:41
From:
Subject: Can you 'bake' a ball in the oven?
I've been advised this by several people. I don't have as much
concern about ruining the ball as I do about that oil and junk coming
out and being in the oven where I cook food. Do you not do this in a
'conventional' oven? Does a pro-shop have a special oven?

If you CAN do it at home and it's safe, what temp and how long? Oh,
and should you take out any insert grips - will they melt? Or can
they withstand the temp?

T




 
Date: 18 Dec 2008 10:47:58
From: Jimmy G
Subject: Re: Can you 'bake' a ball in the oven?
Get an old pie pan and set the ball in the pan. This will catch any oil
running off the ball. My oven has a low temp of 170 and I turn it off after
it reaches that temp and let the ball sit for a few minutes.
<twp1976@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:2462c47f-8340-45e6-81e5-c97b6e91db8b@k9g2000vbl.googlegroups.com...
> I've been advised this by several people. I don't have as much
> concern about ruining the ball as I do about that oil and junk coming
> out and being in the oven where I cook food. Do you not do this in a
> 'conventional' oven? Does a pro-shop have a special oven?
>
> If you CAN do it at home and it's safe, what temp and how long? Oh,
> and should you take out any insert grips - will they melt? Or can
> they withstand the temp?
>
> T




 
Date: 17 Dec 2008 16:22:57
From: Russ
Subject: Re: Can you 'bake' a ball in the oven?
On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 12:43:41 -0800 (PST), twp1976@gmail.com wrote:

>I've been advised this by several people. I don't have as much
>concern about ruining the ball as I do about that oil and junk coming
>out and being in the oven where I cook food. Do you not do this in a
>'conventional' oven? Does a pro-shop have a special oven?
>
>If you CAN do it at home and it's safe, what temp and how long? Oh,
>and should you take out any insert grips - will they melt? Or can
>they withstand the temp?
>
>T

You can bake the ball in your kitchen oven with ease. No worrys.
Just use the lowest heat setting on the range. Place ball in, and
check it every 3-5 minutes. Oil will bead up on hte surface of the
ball, remove and wipe down with isopropyl alcohol. Repeat until
no oil bleads out.

Nothing fancy. The oil will not "drip" out on the oven, so no worry's
about cleaning the oven afterwards.


  
Date: 11 Jan 2009 15:20:27
From:
Subject: Re: Can you 'bake' a ball in the oven?

You can also do this with hot water, avoid the finger holes...

let the ball soak to bring up the cover stock temp, then run hot water in a
final rinse cycle, if you do have oil accumulated on the surface wipe with
isopropyl alcohol.

MJ





"Russ" <removed@protection.com > wrote in message
news:8ouik49paa27gderqqdjcie5hurn88t5u4@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 12:43:41 -0800 (PST), twp1976@gmail.com wrote:
>
>>I've been advised this by several people. I don't have as much
>>concern about ruining the ball as I do about that oil and junk coming
>>out and being in the oven where I cook food. Do you not do this in a
>>'conventional' oven? Does a pro-shop have a special oven?
>>
>>If you CAN do it at home and it's safe, what temp and how long? Oh,
>>and should you take out any insert grips - will they melt? Or can
>>they withstand the temp?
>>
>>T
>
> You can bake the ball in your kitchen oven with ease. No worrys.
> Just use the lowest heat setting on the range. Place ball in, and
> check it every 3-5 minutes. Oil will bead up on hte surface of the
> ball, remove and wipe down with isopropyl alcohol. Repeat until
> no oil bleads out.
>
> Nothing fancy. The oil will not "drip" out on the oven, so no worry's
> about cleaning the oven afterwards.



   
Date: 14 Jan 2009 22:58:00
From:
Subject: Re: Can you 'bake' a ball in the oven?
I've been told never put a bowling ball in the oven due to the fact that
it won't react the same on the lanes,i've usually put my bowling balls
near the furnace to get all the oil off the balls you can put it in luke
warm water but only for about a half hour no longer.
amaturebowler160






    
Date: 15 Jan 2009 08:40:20
From: John O
Subject: Re: Can you 'bake' a ball in the oven?

<meldeper@webtv.net > wrote in message
news:24544-496EC258-262@storefull-3111.bay.webtv.net...
> I've been told never put a bowling ball in the oven due to the fact that
> it won't react the same on the lanes,


Well, that's kinda the whole idea, isn't it? The real warning should be to
not bake the thing like a cake, rather get the oven to about 150 and shut it
down. If you get the shell too hot all sorts of nasty stuff can happen.


> i've usually put my bowling balls
> near the furnace to get all the oil off the balls you can put it in luke
> warm water but only for about a half hour no longer.
> amaturebowler160
>

IME, once the stuff starts coming out, wipe it once and quit the process.
Use ball cleaner to finish the job.

-John O




  
Date: 18 Dec 2008 07:09:50
From: TNL
Subject: Re: Can you 'bake' a ball in the oven?

"Russ" <removed@protection.com > wrote in message
news:8ouik49paa27gderqqdjcie5hurn88t5u4@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 12:43:41 -0800 (PST), twp1976@gmail.com wrote:
>
>>I've been advised this by several people. I don't have as much
>>concern about ruining the ball as I do about that oil and junk coming
>>out and being in the oven where I cook food. Do you not do this in a
>>'conventional' oven? Does a pro-shop have a special oven?
>>
>>If you CAN do it at home and it's safe, what temp and how long? Oh,
>>and should you take out any insert grips - will they melt? Or can
>>they withstand the temp?
>>
>>T
>
> You can bake the ball in your kitchen oven with ease. No worrys.
> Just use the lowest heat setting on the range. Place ball in, and
> check it every 3-5 minutes. Oil will bead up on hte surface of the
> ball, remove and wipe down with isopropyl alcohol. Repeat until
> no oil bleads out.
>
> Nothing fancy. The oil will not "drip" out on the oven, so no worry's
> about cleaning the oven afterwards.

_____________________

I tried this at home one time. The only real side effect is that there
was a smell of the heated oil that permeated the house and the
wife was a little upset with me for using "her" stove for such a
thing..........LOL
--
(Remove "nuttinbut" from email addy to reply direct)
--TNL