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Date: 27 May 2008 18:59:49
From:
Subject: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
As I've mentioned before, I bowled regularly in the late '70s, then
took a long break from the sport before returning this year. I've been
reading up on it and observing as much as I can, but I'm still a
little perplexed about the direction bowling has taken during my
hiatus. Perhaps those of you who've stayed more in touch over the
years can help to clear up some things for me.

First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an "arsenal"
of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions.
Question is, when, how and why did lane conditions change? The move to
synthetics is easy to understand from an economic standpoint, but what
about oiling patterns? Were these changed due to the new lane
materials, or was it done in response to developments in bowling ball
technology (beginning with the advent of urethane balls in the early
'80s)? Or did bowling balls change to suit the new lane conditions? I
realize that now it's all a big cycle (or "circle jerk", if you like)
that keeps going around, but I'm curious as to where it got started.

That brings me to another question: just what was a typical condition
in the mid or late '70s, anyway? I know they used less oil, but how
about the pattern? Did "house" patterns differ from "pro" patterns as
they do today? Was it all just "flat oil?" All I remember about the
old days, at the handful of places where I bowled, is that the lanes
were dryer and even a polyester ball would hook a little at the back
part of the lane. I definitely don't remember my ball (still polyester
to this day) coming back all slimy with oil like it does now.




 
Date: 16 Jun 2008 17:21:18
From: pepsikid3967
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
On May 29, 4:03=A0pm, GalaxyMan <mark2002_1...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> On May 28, 12:57=A0am, "Darby" <tenpinhawk...@mchsi.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Talk to some bowlers in the center you bowl in. These questions are bett=
er
> > answered by them. I don't even get these questions from the youth bowler=
s I
> > coach. Let someone you know catch you up.
> > Dar
>
> > <electronic_d...@hotmail.com> wrote
>
> > > As I've mentioned before, I bowled regularly in the late '70s, then
> > > took a long break from the sport before returning this year. I've been=

> > > reading up on it and observing as much as I can, but I'm still a
> > > little perplexed about the direction bowling has taken during my
> > > hiatus. Perhaps those of you who've stayed more in touch over the
> > > years can help to clear up some things for me.
>
> > > First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an "arsenal"=

> > > of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions.
> > > Question is, when, how and why did lane conditions change? The move to=

> > > synthetics is easy to understand from an economic standpoint, but what=

> > > about oiling patterns? Were these changed due to the new lane
> > > materials, or was it done in response to developments in bowling ball
> > > technology (beginning with the advent of urethane balls in the early
> > > '80s)? Or did bowling balls change to suit the new lane conditions? I
> > > realize that now it's all a big cycle (or "circle jerk", if you like)
> > > that keeps going around, but I'm curious as to where it got started.
>
> > > That brings me to another question: just what was a typical condition
> > > in the mid or late '70s, anyway? I know they used less oil, but how
> > > about the pattern? Did "house" patterns differ from "pro" patterns as
> > > they do today? Was it all just "flat oil?" All I remember about the
> > > old days, at the handful of places where I bowled, is that the lanes
> > > were dryer and even a polyester ball would hook a little at the back
> > > part of the lane. I definitely don't remember my ball (still polyester=

> > > to this day) coming back all slimy with oil like it does now.- Hide qu=
oted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> A lot has changed over the last 30 years.
> the oil machines, the lane surfaces, the oil its self, the the pins
> seem to be close to the same But in the early 7o's
> the had plastic pins not syrlin pins. but plastic balls and later the
> soft rubber balls came into play. we sprayed
> our lanes with a bug sprayer. the a century 100 lane machine oilier.
> this is how it went in the bowling balls - rubber - plastic - soft
> rubber - urethane - core changed then - reactive resin - particle now
> mainly resin that's the bowling balls starting about the early 1980s
> came urethane and early 1990's resin. lane machines spay gun then -
> century machines for along time - the kegel machines have upgraded
> that's where we are now they strip and oil the bowling lane now. they
> also put out a - christmas tree pattern - here is a link for a article
> on that -http://bowlingballgalaxy.com/bowling-lane-conditions/christmas-tr=
ee-p...
> . the century mainly put out a
> house pattern but it was designed for a crown. the oil it had solvents
> in it and was thinner. =A0now it had 100% solids
> and is thicker. =A0there is lots more but I have typrs cramp. I am
> posting this on the board and here is a link to a tips
> website I am writing about.
>
> http://bowling-tips.bowlingballgalaxy.com- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an
"arsenal"
of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions? FALSE

Unfortunately you have been away for awhile!But this statement is so
untrue!
I still bowl with a Blue Hammer fingertip bowling ball on the same oil
conditions for the last 5 years.
All though the oil patterns have changed since the early 90's.

I still manage to hold a respectable 200+ average Oh yes ,I fell into
the trap of buying a new bowling ball!
The Pearl Black Widow!It hooks off the lane and this is playing 15
board right of center.I'm a rightie!

All though My Blue Hammer urethane 16 Lbs goes directly to the 1-2
pocket.

So you can see you really don't need a "arsenal" like you said!

Robert Eckert
www.winningatbowling.com


  
Date: 18 Jun 2008 13:17:03
From: PromptJock
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
> I own one ball, a plastic ball just like I used in the '70s. Oh, and
> it's drilled for conventional grip--right over the label :)

Let me guess: a Brunswick "Maxim" or Columbia300 "White Dot"? :)

FWIW, you might want to consider getting a MILD reactive like a
Brunswick "Groove" to go with your plastic ball. There are times when
you need a reactive to "cut through the oil" to get to the pocket
while using the plastic to kill those corner pins....


  
Date: 18 Jun 2008 11:21:13
From:
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
I think Dar misunderstood my question. I wasn't asking how I could be
competitive on today's conditions, I just wanted some historical
perspective on what happened between the time I stopped bowling and
the present day.

I own one ball, a plastic ball just like I used in the '70s. Oh, and
it's drilled for conventional grip--right over the label :)


   
Date: 18 Jun 2008 19:47:37
From: Darlene Block
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
Sorry I misunderstood. Simply put, the balls today have a more porous
surface that grips the lanes more on the dry portions of the lane. The balls
also have a more complex weight block, so different drilling positions will
allow the ball to do different things, like hook early or go longer before
it hooks, plus much more.
The lanes have much more oil applied in a variety of patterns that will
have an effect on the way the ball moves as it goes from oily to dry parts
of the lanes.
Does that help?
Dar

<electronic_dave@hotmail.com > wrote
>I think Dar misunderstood my question. I wasn't asking how I could be
> competitive on today's conditions, I just wanted some historical
> perspective on what happened between the time I stopped bowling and
> the present day.
>
> I own one ball, a plastic ball just like I used in the '70s. Oh, and
> it's drilled for conventional grip--right over the label :)




  
Date: 18 Jun 2008 08:42:11
From: Christian Bryda
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
You could ask the same questions of any other major sport in the country
or abroad..Baseball,football,basketball and hockey have all had similar
changes in the last 30 years,just like bowling has.Technologies change
on a timely basis.As far as NEEDING all the balls you can have to match
lane conditions..That is only true if you are a touring 1 or 2 pro
bowler.For just a local couple houses type league bowler.You only need a
couple balls.I personally have bowled the last 20 years with 1 ball at
my HOE lanes.Its an original burgundy hammer and from wood to synthetics
I have not changed the line I play..2 years ago I had top honors in my
county for highest average of 237 and came clsoe to breaking the state
recored by a pin.I had to take off the last 2 years and have recently
been talked into coming back..I started 3 weeks ago in a trios
coorslight MONEY league and nothing has chaned..I am averaging in the
230's with the same ball as usual.We are in 1st place right now.So we
will see what happens..I grew up with The Dorin sisters and they are
from my home lanes as well..



  
Date: 17 Jun 2008 16:38:58
From: Rob
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question

"pepsikid3967" <pepsikid3967@aol.com > wrote in message
news:f6411163-6acd-413f-acb2-457091cd7ad9@d45g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...
> First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an
> "arsenal"
> of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions? FALSE
>
> Unfortunately you have been away for awhile!But this statement is so
> untrue!
> I still bowl with a Blue Hammer fingertip bowling ball on the same oil
> conditions for the last 5 years.
> All though the oil patterns have changed since the early 90's.
>
> I still manage to hold a respectable 200+ average Oh yes ,I fell into
> the trap of buying a new bowling ball!
> The Pearl Black Widow!It hooks off the lane and this is playing 15
> board right of center.I'm a rightie!

> All though My Blue Hammer urethane 16 Lbs goes directly to the 1-2
> pocket.
>
> So you can see you really don't need a "arsenal" like you said!
>
> Robert Eckert
> www.winningatbowling.com

First, 200 is not competitive any more.
Second, the edge is the dry part of the modern lane condition, so throwing a
reactive ball down five board is... a good way to hook it off the lane.
Bowlers with a clue know this. But, if you're happy bouncing urethane into
Brooklyn off the edge, go for it.

Rob.




   
Date: 17 Jun 2008 16:07:33
From: Darlene Block
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
Hi Rob, how's the world treating you? We haven't heard from you for a while.
I'm sitting here high and dry in Iowa, 30 miles from the Mississippi
between Dubuque and Davenport. But family and friends live in Cedar Rapids
and Iowa City, and I grew up in Cedar County. This 500 year flood is
devastating and personal.
Dar

"Rob" <robbie.buckley@optusnet.com.au > wrote
>
> "pepsikid3967" <pepsikid3967@aol.com> wrote in
>> First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an
>> "arsenal"
>> of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions? FALSE
>>
>> Unfortunately you have been away for awhile!But this statement is so
>> untrue!
>> I still bowl with a Blue Hammer fingertip bowling ball on the same oil
>> conditions for the last 5 years.
>> All though the oil patterns have changed since the early 90's.
>>
>> I still manage to hold a respectable 200+ average Oh yes ,I fell into
>> the trap of buying a new bowling ball!
>> The Pearl Black Widow!It hooks off the lane and this is playing 15
>> board right of center.I'm a rightie!
>
>> All though My Blue Hammer urethane 16 Lbs goes directly to the 1-2
>> pocket.
>>
>> So you can see you really don't need a "arsenal" like you said!
>>
>> Robert Eckert
>> www.winningatbowling.com
>
> First, 200 is not competitive any more.
> Second, the edge is the dry part of the modern lane condition, so throwing
> a reactive ball down five board is... a good way to hook it off the lane.
> Bowlers with a clue know this. But, if you're happy bouncing urethane into
> Brooklyn off the edge, go for it.
>
> Rob.
>
>




    
Date: 19 Jun 2008 01:21:43
From: Rob
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question

"Darlene Block" <tenpinhawkeye@mchsi.com > wrote in message
news:9jR5k.158198$TT4.63610@attbi_s22...
> Hi Rob, how's the world treating you? We haven't heard from you for a
> while.
> I'm sitting here high and dry in Iowa, 30 miles from the Mississippi
> between Dubuque and Davenport. But family and friends live in Cedar Rapids
> and Iowa City, and I grew up in Cedar County. This 500 year flood is
> devastating and personal.
> Dar

Hi Dar, travelling ok. Finding that bowling and running a bowling centre
don't mix too well although I did run 5th in the Australian Masters last
year. Still doing a bit of chemisting in my spare time, and been playing a
bit (well, a lot really) of online poker. Badly, lol.

Hope your family & friends pull through ok - we had a lot of flooding
through most of Queensland early this year, but your situation over there
sounds a lot worse.

Cheers, Robbie.






  
Date: 17 Jun 2008 03:35:58
From: Darlene Block
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
I'll stick with my advice, let some of the better bowlers you know tell you
what would be best for you. Generally speaking, if you are going to be a
serious bowler who bowls against real competition in many centers you'll
need an arsenal. If you are going to have fun in one or two handicap leagues
a week in one center, one or two ball will probably be enough. If you want
to add one or two balls a year pretty soon you'll have an arsenal too.
And get some lessons if you want to improve your game. I know many junk
ball bowlers who carry a 200+ average, but they better not go against
someone who is a real bowler!
Dar

"pepsikid3967" <pepsikid3967@aol.com >
wrote457091cd7ad9@d45g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...
On May 29, 4:03 pm, GalaxyMan <mark2002_1...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> On May 28, 12:57 am, "Darby" <tenpinhawk...@mchsi.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Talk to some bowlers in the center you bowl in. These questions are
> > better
> > answered by them. I don't even get these questions from the youth
> > bowlers I
> > coach. Let someone you know catch you up.
> > Dar
>
> > <electronic_d...@hotmail.com> wrote
>
> > > As I've mentioned before, I bowled regularly in the late '70s, then
> > > took a long break from the sport before returning this year. I've been
> > > reading up on it and observing as much as I can, but I'm still a
> > > little perplexed about the direction bowling has taken during my
> > > hiatus. Perhaps those of you who've stayed more in touch over the
> > > years can help to clear up some things for me.
>
> > > First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an "arsenal"
> > > of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions.
> > > Question is, when, how and why did lane conditions change? The move to
> > > synthetics is easy to understand from an economic standpoint, but what
> > > about oiling patterns? Were these changed due to the new lane
> > > materials, or was it done in response to developments in bowling ball
> > > technology (beginning with the advent of urethane balls in the early
> > > '80s)? Or did bowling balls change to suit the new lane conditions? I
> > > realize that now it's all a big cycle (or "circle jerk", if you like)
> > > that keeps going around, but I'm curious as to where it got started.
>
> > > That brings me to another question: just what was a typical condition
> > > in the mid or late '70s, anyway? I know they used less oil, but how
> > > about the pattern? Did "house" patterns differ from "pro" patterns as
> > > they do today? Was it all just "flat oil?" All I remember about the
> > > old days, at the handful of places where I bowled, is that the lanes
> > > were dryer and even a polyester ball would hook a little at the back
> > > part of the lane. I definitely don't remember my ball (still polyester
> > > to this day) coming back all slimy with oil like it does now.- Hide
> > > quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> A lot has changed over the last 30 years.
> the oil machines, the lane surfaces, the oil its self, the the pins
> seem to be close to the same But in the early 7o's
> the had plastic pins not syrlin pins. but plastic balls and later the
> soft rubber balls came into play. we sprayed
> our lanes with a bug sprayer. the a century 100 lane machine oilier.
> this is how it went in the bowling balls - rubber - plastic - soft
> rubber - urethane - core changed then - reactive resin - particle now
> mainly resin that's the bowling balls starting about the early 1980s
> came urethane and early 1990's resin. lane machines spay gun then -
> century machines for along time - the kegel machines have upgraded
> that's where we are now they strip and oil the bowling lane now. they
> also put out a - christmas tree pattern - here is a link for a article
> on
> that -http://bowlingballgalaxy.com/bowling-lane-conditions/christmas-tree-p...
> . the century mainly put out a
> house pattern but it was designed for a crown. the oil it had solvents
> in it and was thinner. now it had 100% solids
> and is thicker. there is lots more but I have typrs cramp. I am
> posting this on the board and here is a link to a tips
> website I am writing about.
>
> http://bowling-tips.bowlingballgalaxy.com- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an
"arsenal"
of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions? FALSE

Unfortunately you have been away for awhile!But this statement is so
untrue!
I still bowl with a Blue Hammer fingertip bowling ball on the same oil
conditions for the last 5 years.
All though the oil patterns have changed since the early 90's.

I still manage to hold a respectable 200+ average Oh yes ,I fell into
the trap of buying a new bowling ball!
The Pearl Black Widow!It hooks off the lane and this is playing 15
board right of center.I'm a rightie!

All though My Blue Hammer urethane 16 Lbs goes directly to the 1-2
pocket.

So you can see you really don't need a "arsenal" like you said!

Robert Eckert
www.winningatbowling.com




 
Date: 29 May 2008 13:03:58
From: GalaxyMan
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
On May 28, 12:57=A0am, "Darby" <tenpinhawk...@mchsi.com > wrote:
> Talk to some bowlers in the center you bowl in. These questions are better=

> answered by them. I don't even get these questions from the youth bowlers =
I
> coach. Let someone you know catch you up.
> Dar
>
> <electronic_d...@hotmail.com> wrote
>
>
>
> > As I've mentioned before, I bowled regularly in the late '70s, then
> > took a long break from the sport before returning this year. I've been
> > reading up on it and observing as much as I can, but I'm still a
> > little perplexed about the direction bowling has taken during my
> > hiatus. Perhaps those of you who've stayed more in touch over the
> > years can help to clear up some things for me.
>
> > First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an "arsenal"
> > of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions.
> > Question is, when, how and why did lane conditions change? The move to
> > synthetics is easy to understand from an economic standpoint, but what
> > about oiling patterns? Were these changed due to the new lane
> > materials, or was it done in response to developments in bowling ball
> > technology (beginning with the advent of urethane balls in the early
> > '80s)? Or did bowling balls change to suit the new lane conditions? I
> > realize that now it's all a big cycle (or "circle jerk", if you like)
> > that keeps going around, but I'm curious as to where it got started.
>
> > That brings me to another question: just what was a typical condition
> > in the mid or late '70s, anyway? I know they used less oil, but how
> > about the pattern? Did "house" patterns differ from "pro" patterns as
> > they do today? Was it all just "flat oil?" All I remember about the
> > old days, at the handful of places where I bowled, is that the lanes
> > were dryer and even a polyester ball would hook a little at the back
> > part of the lane. I definitely don't remember my ball (still polyester
> > to this day) coming back all slimy with oil like it does now.- Hide quot=
ed text -
>
> - Show quoted text -
A lot has changed over the last 30 years.
the oil machines, the lane surfaces, the oil its self, the the pins
seem to be close to the same But in the early 7o's
the had plastic pins not syrlin pins. but plastic balls and later the
soft rubber balls came into play. we sprayed
our lanes with a bug sprayer. the a century 100 lane machine oilier.
this is how it went in the bowling balls - rubber - plastic - soft
rubber - urethane - core changed then - reactive resin - particle now
mainly resin that's the bowling balls starting about the early 1980s
came urethane and early 1990's resin. lane machines spay gun then -
century machines for along time - the kegel machines have upgraded
that's where we are now they strip and oil the bowling lane now. they
also put out a - christmas tree pattern - here is a link for a article
on that - http://bowlingballgalaxy.com/bowling-lane-conditions/christmas-tre=
e-pattern.html
=2E the century mainly put out a
house pattern but it was designed for a crown. the oil it had solvents
in it and was thinner. now it had 100% solids
and is thicker. there is lots more but I have typrs cramp. I am
posting this on the board and here is a link to a tips
website I am writing about.

http://bowling-tips.bowlingballgalaxy.com


 
Date: 28 May 2008 05:57:31
From: Darby
Subject: Re: '70s lane conditions & the chicken-or-egg question
Talk to some bowlers in the center you bowl in. These questions are better
answered by them. I don't even get these questions from the youth bowlers I
coach. Let someone you know catch you up.
Dar

<electronic_dave@hotmail.com > wrote
> As I've mentioned before, I bowled regularly in the late '70s, then
> took a long break from the sport before returning this year. I've been
> reading up on it and observing as much as I can, but I'm still a
> little perplexed about the direction bowling has taken during my
> hiatus. Perhaps those of you who've stayed more in touch over the
> years can help to clear up some things for me.
>
> First of all, I keep hearing that the modern player needs an "arsenal"
> of high-tech balls to be competitive on modern lane conditions.
> Question is, when, how and why did lane conditions change? The move to
> synthetics is easy to understand from an economic standpoint, but what
> about oiling patterns? Were these changed due to the new lane
> materials, or was it done in response to developments in bowling ball
> technology (beginning with the advent of urethane balls in the early
> '80s)? Or did bowling balls change to suit the new lane conditions? I
> realize that now it's all a big cycle (or "circle jerk", if you like)
> that keeps going around, but I'm curious as to where it got started.
>
> That brings me to another question: just what was a typical condition
> in the mid or late '70s, anyway? I know they used less oil, but how
> about the pattern? Did "house" patterns differ from "pro" patterns as
> they do today? Was it all just "flat oil?" All I remember about the
> old days, at the handful of places where I bowled, is that the lanes
> were dryer and even a polyester ball would hook a little at the back
> part of the lane. I definitely don't remember my ball (still polyester
> to this day) coming back all slimy with oil like it does now.